Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
96 Avalon
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Fellow Toyota People

I have a 2011 Toyota Tundra 4.6 with 4WD w the factory oil cooler.(211K Miles)
I changed the oil always toyota 0-20 and noticed a small amount of milky oil in the cap. Awesome I have a blown head gasket on the truck that I have made 2 payments on. So hear me out on this guys. I sh*t a brick when I saw it. I drive this truck litterly like 5000 miles a month. So The day after the oil change I drove it about 65 miles one way and added about a half quart of oil b/c I only did a drain and fill and didnt change the filter b/c I do that every other time. So I shorted the oil a bit. Still ened up using the full 8 qt. The milky oil in the cap was worse then b4 the oil change. BUT...the truck runs fine isnt loosing coolant is not smoking has good heat and good oil pressure. I also marked the coolant b4 driving.

SOO....
After adding the the half a quart of oil. I drove it another 145 miles Milky oil is now gone. The truck shows 0 signs of a blown head gasket and running 80-90MPH for the day it seams fine.
Any one have any type of suggestion on what could be causing so much moisture in my oil we are having some large temp swings but I have never seen this b4. Could it be from the short trips over the weekend then burned it off after i ran it on the highway a few hours
Thanks
 

·
Registered
01 Avalon XL, 03 Avalon XL
Joined
·
992 Posts
Hydrocarbon combustion creates water (among many other things, like energy and exhaust gases). Some of this water goes out the tailpipe, some makes its way past the rings into the crankcase. You end up with milky oil in various places -- milky as a result of emulsified oil + water.

You'll see milky oil on the cap until you've done at least a 20-30 minute run after the engine is fully up to temperature. Once the emulsified oil is fully warmed up, water in the oil will be driven off by heat-accelerated evaporation.

You might just hook up your OBD2 reader and scan your coolant temperature (and oil temp, if your scanner reads it) during driving and idling -- just to be sure you don't have a thermostat that's failed. They are usually engineering to fail open, so a bad 'stat will result in lower than optimum engine temperature and will significantly slow down the evaporation of water-of-combustion emulsification. It will also mess up your gas mileage (ECU sees the cold engine and adds fuel to the mixture).
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top