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Not disagreeing but to go that route you need to include a lot more areas, such as
Flood zones
High fire risk areas
Earthquake areas
Tornado areas
Yup, I knew a guy who got flooded out several times. His insurance company finally told him no more. One more flood, and you're on your own. He built a new house up on the hill of his property, but still has the old place 10 feet from the waters edge (doesn't live in it anymore, and keeps what he really wants upstairs (2nd floor)).
 

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Not disagreeing but to go that route you need to include a lot more areas, such as
Flood zones
High fire risk areas
Earthquake areas
Tornado areas
Agreed: Accept the risk or don't come crying and begging when disaster happens. Of course, this being America, people in high risk areas have a "right" to being insured that shit-sucking lawyers are more than happy to pursue....

282530


...and I have to words for that.
 

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Joined the dark side. :D
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Agreed: Accept the risk or don't come crying and begging when disaster happens. Of course, this being America, people in high risk areas have a "right" to being insured that shit-sucking lawyers are more than happy to pursue....

View attachment 282530

...and I have to words for that.
Me too... it's "The pursuit of victim hood", the short version is "Democrat" or correctly named "impossibility documented mentally insane cry baby". LOL

Maybe I need that sleep after all........... wait, I just woke up!!!!
 

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Not disagreeing but to go that route you need to include a lot more areas, such as
Flood zones
High fire risk areas
Earthquake areas
Tornado areas
Agreed as to building on a known flood plain or on beach sand.

As to the others (fire, earthquake, tornado) you would pretty much have to vacate the entire nation. Or at least virtually everything west of the Mississippi River. No small task.
 

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Agreed as to building on a known flood plain or on beach sand.

As to the others (fire, earthquake, tornado) you would pretty much have to vacate the entire nation. Or at least virtually everything west of the Mississippi River. No small task.
You know, I was thinking the same thing. A buddy lived in a "flood plain" for 19 years, and paid for flood insurance. It never flooded the entire time he was there. I think it's just a matter of where you decide to live, and knowing your house could be blown away, burned in a fire, fall off a cliff, or get flooded out. I'd buy that second part, but the tornadoes have been hitting Alabama a lot recently, which is east of the Mississippi. And Hurricanes have been going up the east coast more too, despite AOC saying they only target POOR people. :rolleyes:
 

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You know, I was thinking the same thing. A buddy lived in a "flood plain" for 19 years, and paid for flood insurance. It never flooded the entire time he was there. I think it's just a matter of where you decide to live, and knowing your house could be blown away, burned in a fire, fall off a cliff, or get flooded out. I'd buy that second part, but the tornadoes have been hitting Alabama a lot recently, which is east of the Mississippi. And Hurricanes have been going up the east coast more too, despite AOC saying they only target POOR people. :rolleyes:
Many areas out west people keep building in more rural areas. Areas where there is lots of timber to burn.
In the south central US you have tornado alley.
San Francisco has had many earthquakes including major ones in 1906 and 1989.
These are all risky areas and people keep building.
Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy went up the Eastern seaboard causing major damage all the way to NY and NJ.
Houston had massive flooding during a hurricane because politicians allowed neighborhoods to be built in known low lying areas.

The problem, as always, is WHAT is too risky and WHO decides it.
 

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Many areas out west people keep building in more rural areas. Areas where there is lots of timber to burn.
In the south central US you have tornado alley.
San Francisco has had many earthquakes including major ones in 1906 and 1989.
These are all risky areas and people keep building.
Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy went up the Eastern seaboard causing major damage all the way to NY and NJ.
Houston had massive flooding during a hurricane because politicians allowed neighborhoods to be built in known low lying areas.

The problem, as always, is WHAT is too risky and WHO decides it.
Yup, lived in tornado alley. It was tornado season from January 1st thru December 31st.
And you knew when a bad storm was coming when the tarantulas started crossing the road.
 

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I wonder when the gov will ban drinking water due to safety concern. I mean lots of old people choke by drinking water. LOL
They'll ban drinking water when it's unsafe to do so. A prime example is Flint. Ice Mountain water (a Nestle Co.) company donates millions of bottles of drinking water to the city after the news came out. The big problem stems from the Democrat city concil decided not to pay the city of Detroit for water services (Detroit bump up their rates), so the city of Flint chose to get their water from the Flint river. Unfortunately, it's polluted from all the years of manufacturing stuff, and dumping toxins into it. Kind of like that river in Ohio that caught fire, or the Rouge River in Detroit that was so polluted you didn't have to be gawd to walk across. :rolleyes:
 
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