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Discussion Starter #1
2000 Camry LE sedan with 181.5k miles and unknown service history.

As I'm doing repairs on the car, I noticed large cracks in the dog bone mount. However, when revving the engine with the throttle cable, the engine does not move at all.

There is no vibration in the seat in any gear.

However, when I shift into reverse from park or neutral, I feel a clunk. There are no other clunks in any other gear.

Questions:
Should I replace the dog bone mount, despite not having any problems with back and forth engine movement?

What is causing the clunk when shifting into neutral?

Is there an algorithm for clunking noises to diagnose specific engine mounts?

Autozone has lifetime warranty on its engine mounts and the prices aren't bad. I figure that if I can easily do the engine mounts myself, I get the Autozone, then warranty them if/when they break.

Thanks
 

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'00 4 Cyl. Auto Camry LE
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Yes, replace that dog bone mount as your primary diagnostic step - it's toast.
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The "DEA A7238 Front Right Engine Torque Strut Mount" purchased from Amazon (back in 2017) is holding up well here, no issues.. Can recommend that one to you. Cost was under 10 bucks.
 

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You may have answered the first two of your questions yourself. A cracked mount puts further strain on the other mounts and degrades their effectiveness. You may be replacing other mounts if the dogbone is that bad.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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x3

that is by far the simplest, cheapest and easiest of the mounts to replace, do that now before the rest of them start to suffer
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks. Will do. To replace the dog bone mount, do I need to use a floor jack to raise the engine?
 

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Various Toyotas
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I've had several Gen 3 and 4 Camrys in my family and whenever I've replaced the "dog bone" mount (Toyota calls it a "Center Engine Mounting Insulator" for the I4 and an "Engine Moving Control Rod" for the V6, but uses the second wording in the FSM) it always went bad again later. That tells me that one or all of the other mounts are also bad. You may need to replace more than just the dog bone mount. I'm assuming you have the 4 cylinder engine mated with an automatic transmission. If so, this is the mount you want: Toyota part #12363-74130. The manual transmission models use a different mount and the V6 uses different mounts as well, so it depends on what your configuration is.

I know you said you would get one from AutoZone, but in case anyone thinks they want to get a mount fom the junkyard, I say "good luck" to that. They are almost always broken or compromised mounts at the junkyard.
 

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Thanks. Will do. To replace the dog bone mount, do I need to use a floor jack to raise the engine?
Not normally. It depends on how worn your other mounts are, but if it doesn't line up, just pull/push on the engine. Make sure to fasten the rearmost bolt first, then go to the front bolt.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks. I definitely need an easy engine mount to change. My confidence level is pretty low, because 10 years ago (or so), I screwed up doing engine mounts on my Volvo, taking me a month to fix it.

Yes, I have the 5S-FE with an automatic transmission (A541E?).

When I went to the junkyard, I looked at the V-6 Camrys. The engine bay was too tight for me to work. For example, I tried to access the spark plugs under the intake manifold next to the firewall, but couldn't even get my hand in there!

My thinking with the AutoZone brand for the dog bone is that it has a lifetime warranty and looks really easy to replace. If so and that dog bone ever breaks, I can easily warranty it.

Any thoughts why the dog bone looks horrible, but the engine doesn't move, and I only have clunking when going into reverse?
 

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47 ft lbs torque on those bolts for the engine mouting control rod, BTW. I've never worked on the V6, but yeah.....it's tougher, but there's always a way to reach something, which might involve more work.

Not sure why the engine doesn't move, but the engine mounting control rod (rubber part) gets messed up because at least one of the other mounts is messed up. They work together.
 
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Second that


if the dog bone Mount wears out or cracks again fairly quick, you got a bad front at very minima and also rear and or transmission mount.

here’s a V6 guide.


I would destroy the dog bone in 6mon. So far it’s holding out okay
 

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See if you can check the other three mounts as well. One or all of them are the reason your engine mounting control rod rubber was broken. When I removed the front mount on my son's Gen 3 Camry, I found it was completely worn out.

I hope you saw that I posted the torque specs?

Also, to anyone doing this on a Gen 3 Camry, go to the junkyard and find a Gen 4 Camry and buy the bracket into which the mount is inserted and use a new Gen 4 mount. It is more stout than the Gen 3 mount. Basically Toyota realized it was too small and updated it for the Gen 4. If you don't have a junkyard nearby or don't want to do that, get a Gen 4 bracket online or at the Toyota dealer.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks. I torqued the dog bone to spec. Test driving it: now shifting into neutral clunks! Maybe I should reinstall the old one, LOL.
 

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Thanks. I torqued the dog bone to spec. Test driving it: now shifting into neutral clunks! Maybe I should reinstall the old one, LOL.
Ha, your fix just revealed another problem. Time to investigate.
 

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A word about that warranted, Auto Zone, Advance, O'Reillys et al...its a one time thing. That's the 'limited' part, you're limited to one replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
^^ I'm looking at O'Reilly and AutoZone's wording on their receipts. They say nothing about one-time only lifetime replacement limitations. Where did you find information about any such limitation?

I've also warrantied lifetime warranty items at O'Reilly more than Autozone and was never told about a one-time exclusion. As a parallel, the extended warranties at Best Buy are one-time only.

Also, the new clunking went away, leaving the original clunking into reverse the only problem, though a bit less clunky.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Update: I just finished changing the transmission mount. The rear bushing portion at the top was completely torn through and through. You can't see it unless you remove it. There was oil around it, suggesting that an oil leak with the prior owner damaged the mount.

A couple bolts went on with difficulty, but I removed them and reinstalled. All bolts accepted the torque (47 ft-lbs).

I lose the underside rubber cap in the frame. Need I get a junkyard one?

I put Loctite blue on all bolt threads, so I have to wait 24 hours before doing a test drive, which is fine with me because I'm exhausted.

I have the rear mount in hand and will get the front mount next week. I might do both at the same time. We'll see.

Thanks for your help.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Update: I just finished the front and rear mounts, torquing everything to spec, except the rear top mount where it attaches to the engine bracket. There was no change in the clunking after I replaced the rear mount. After I replaced the front mount, the clunking improved about 50-70%, but persists.

The front and rear mounts had no cracks and their top, where the bolt/stud fits, moved only a little by hand, as opposed to the new mounts which barely moved by hand.

The only thing that I could have done wrong was not use a torque wrench on the top of the rear mount-engine bracket (no access and barely got a flex head ratcheting wrench in), but I tightened it as hard as I could.

Any suggestions?
 

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I used a long extension(s) with possibly a universal joint that allows you to bend the angle a bit. Torqued from up above engine that way. Been a while so I don't remember where through the engine bay I oriented the extension.
 

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To summarize, are you saying that after replacing all of the mounts the clunking improved but persists?

If so, then there is something else still making noise. With all new engine mounts we can (hopefully) rule that out (barring any crap quality aftermarket parts issue).

Since it only makes the clunk when you shift into reverse, which is a driveline input that is managed within the transmission, then on a car with 180k+ miles and unknown service history, it may be time for a complete fluid flush of the AT, make sure to flush all of it, not only the 1/3 that comes out when the pan is dropped.

While you are at it, also flush the brake fluid and the power steering fluid and the coolant, as those are often overlooked, and should be done every 50k miles or so, in old car maintenance.

It is entirely possible that the clunk is normal and so long as you don't apply power until after the clunk has occurred each time, might be ok for a very long time. Or, flushing the transmission might improve it. Also, there might be a reverse band that needs adjusting, on the inside of the transmission (I don't know about AT, just guessing about that last part).

N
 
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