Toyota Nation Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Did somebody say snow?
Joined
·
231 Posts
Here's some pics of my system. I'm using a Yakima Blockhead; there are other brands as well. Toyota also makes an adapter for the bed cleat. Search "simple bike mounts".



I had some aluminum stock laying around, drilled and tapped it for two 1/4 - 20 threaded holes in it using the Yakima bracket for a guide to where to drill and bolted the bracket to the rail. Because of the length of the stock, I didn't have a saw to cut it, so I unscrewed the rail from the bed using a #30 Torx driver. My original plan was to use a T-Nut that fit in the rail with a
3/8-16 thread but I'm borrowing the brackets and couldn't mod them the way I wanted. Hence the stock. Either way, it works perfect.

 

·
Rocket Scientist
Joined
·
36 Posts
http://www.trdparts4u.com/MC-DDGI-E.aspx

They have the Toyota bike attachment there for On Sale For: $36.58.

To quote the website:

Bike Attachment, Bed-Mounted
(Part #PT785-35052)

Regular Price: $ 49.00
On Sale For: $36.58

Bike Attachment, Bed-Mounted details

This Fork Mount Bike Attachment allows you to attach your bike to the bed rail. Utilizes the front forks and skewer, AND your existing cleat from your bed, or you may purchase an additional cleat #PT785-35050-S1 found on this website.
 

·
n00b
Joined
·
2,104 Posts
i got these for $10 at the local bike store. Then fabbed it to the rail system



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I bought 2 of these:

http://www.theproscloset.com/Shop/Control/Product/fp/vpid/6477417/vpcsid/0/SFV/32625

Total was around $21. Then I went to Lowes, got 2 large washers to fit inside the bed rail system ( I brought in a bed cleat with me to use to size the correct washer), bought 1.5" long bolts (I think they were 1.5" long, might have been 2", but with a 1/4" diameter thread. They fit PERFECTLY through the hole in the rocky mounts bike mount), a couple of lock washers, and fashioned my own mount system. I think I spent around $32 on all hardware required (for 2 mounts).

Instead of putting the bolt through the washer and having the bolt stick out towards you from the rail, then securing the bike mount with a nut - I did something else. I used JB Weld to secure one of the nuts that fits my bolt to one of the large washers that fits the rail. I used one of the bolts to align the hole in the washer with the nut to make it easier - just have to be careful not to JB Weld the nut/washer to the bolt itself. I did two of these per mount.

When the JB Weld was dry, I slid the washer/nut assembly into the bed rail with the nut on the inside of the rail (so you can't see the nut itself). Then take the bolt, put it through hole in the bike mount, then screw it into the nut/washer assembly you just made. Do that again for the 2nd hole in the mount. I used a lock washer between the head of the bolt and the bike mount itself. I also had to trim probably a little less than a 1/4" off of my bolt, otherwise it would hit the back of the bed rail before it was tight.

To do this I threaded a nut onto the bolt, trimmed off with a dremel what I didn't want of the bolt, then took the nut off. The nut will reshape the threads that got mangled by the dremel. If you dont do it this way, you might not be able to thread a nut on the bolt at all after you trim the excess threads from the bolt.

The JB Weld securing the nut/washer together is only to keep the two together. By putting the nut/washer assembly into the rail so that the bolt has to go through the washer before it threads into the nut, the JB Weld is providing no assistance in securing the load down. On the other hand, if you were to put the nut/washer assembly into the rail with the nut facing you, then you would be depending on the JB Weld to hold the nut to the washer, and therefore keeping the entire load secure... Not the optimal situation in my opinion.

So far I only hauled one bike about 15 miles with this setup. It was secure as can be though. I just used a bungee to secure the back tire. Another that is nice is that these mounts can double as tie down points. I take out the clutch part of the mount and store them under my seat when not in use. The mount itself stays mounted on the rail. You can attach bungees or tie downs to them to secure other things - just remember to stay within the safe load limits of the bed rail system itself.

Sorry no pics, but I suppose I could snap a few if they'd be of any help.
 

·
Did somebody say snow?
Joined
·
231 Posts
I bought 2 of these:

http://www.theproscloset.com/Shop/Control/Product/fp/vpid/6477417/vpcsid/0/SFV/32625

Another that is nice is that these mounts can double as tie down points. I take out the clutch part of the mount and store them under my seat when not in use. The mount itself stays mounted on the rail. You can attach bungees or tie downs to them to secure other things - just remember to stay within the safe load limits of the bed rail system itself.
+1 for using the mounts as tie downs. Did the Rocky Mounts for that price come with the skewers? Do they lock like the Yakimas?

Just curious as to what the load limits are for the rails? I know when I took the rail off, the bolt was stout but the rail itself doesn't seem to be designed for excessive loads. I know it's been brought up about mounting a chain saw using the rails.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I dont know specifically what the load limits are. I want to say it was 125lbs per cleat using the cleat system - don't quote me on that though.

The Rocky Mounts did come with the skewers, however those particular ones do not have locks. You can get the locking type, however those are more expensive. I figure if someone is going to steal my bike, then they'll probably get it either way. I dont plan on leaving the truck unattended with a bike in the bed anyways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
If you already have the toyota one you can do what I did, it does not move around at all.
 

·
Did somebody say snow?
Joined
·
231 Posts
I made one of these, and it seems to work well.
http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/bikerack/makerack.htm

Bonus is you don't have to remove the front wheel.
Ingenius, but what do you do to keep it (and the bikes) from shifting in transport? Yes, removing the front wheel can be a pain for those without disc brakes, but one other advantage of using the rails to mount the bike is when you're hauling stuff in the bed, you can rest the rear tire on it. With the PVC pipe rack, you lose storage area.

Nice bike, btw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
yeah, it is a nice bike, but not mine. I have an epic.

Either way, it doesn't shift because you build it to the width of the bed. You do lose a little storage space, but I just put anything I need around the bikes. For the most part, I just use my hitch rack, but when I need to haul more than that will carry, I load up the bed. All in all, I can carry 6 bikes, 5 riders, and all our gear without issue. (although it is a bit cramped in the back of the DC)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
So I went to adjust my mounts last night, trying to move them as close to the the outside of the bed as possible therefore maximizing the storage space between the bikes. I loosened the mounts, slid them over, tightened them a bit. Mounted the bike to finish tightening them and to make sure they were tight enough. While finishing tightening the bolts, the washers securing the mounts to the bed began to bend.

The washers are obviously not strong enough. I ordered a rail mounting kit meant to mount the Rocky Mounts to Toyota bed rails. Those should be a bit stronger.

I just wanted to give everyone a heads up that this solution isn't strong enough. At least the washers bent instead of the bed rails!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I have two of them from a company called Rocky Mounts. They are keyed/lockable and are sturdy as hell. Paid like $49 a piece online.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top