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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 3 year old Walmart max battery is working fine...However, will buying a fresh new battery make sense?
It often gets double digit negative zero in my area during a winter and can be dangerous if a car battery fails.

Also, because i will likely need a new battery anyways in 1 or 2 years, the price of a new battery in 1 or 2 years will likely be much higher. Buying a new battery now may save $30-50 over next years price
 

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How is it dangerous if the battery fails? They don't fail in the middle of a drive, they fail when you need to start the car. We get those kinds of temperatures up here and if I'm starting my car I'm usually near a building with heat I could fall back on. Are you often in places where you can't reach out for help or would be otherwise stranded? Are you often in places where you'd be stuck in a bad neighborhood? Some other reason I'm not thinking of?

I replace them when they go bad personally, but if you'd sleep better with a fresh battery it's not unreasonable to replace preemptively I suppose, especially if you'd be in danger if you can't start the car.
 

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Heat is harder on a battery than cold, I always carry a small jumper box especially when I was in Northern Wyoming and Montana. Used it a couple times over several cold winters, always got the Toyota started and home.
My last Interstate lasted for 9 years, I did replace that one out of paranoia. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How is it dangerous if the battery fails? They don't fail in the middle of a drive, they fail when you need to start the car. We get those kinds of temperatures up here and if I'm starting my car I'm usually near a building with heat I could fall back on. Are you often in places where you can't reach out for help or would be otherwise stranded? Are you often in places where you'd be stuck in a bad neighborhood? Some other reason I'm not thinking of?

I replace them when they go bad personally, but if you'd sleep better with a fresh battery it's not unreasonable to replace preemptively I suppose, especially if you'd be in danger if you can't start the car.
re: Up in northern New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, ...can get stuck in areas with no cell phone coverage, long time before another vehicle comes along, some nights snow gets so bad, even plow trucks are taken off the road, many areas have no local PD. Car fails for any reason-----you may be on your own for hours.
 

· Mr. Roo
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Replacing a perfectly good battery after only 3 years definitely seems like a big waste of money and is not the ideal solution for the theoretical situation. Like sdspeed said, a portable battery jumper would be better in all situations anyway.

Or, what if you just got a battery now while the prices are what they are, and then just save it for later when it's actually needed? Just store it.
 

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My 3 year old Walmart max battery is working fine...However, will buying a fresh new battery make sense?
It often gets double digit negative zero in my area during a winter and can be dangerous if a car battery fails.

Also, because i will likely need a new battery anyways in 1 or 2 years, the price of a new battery in 1 or 2 years will likely be much higher. Buying a new battery now may save $30-50 over next years price
Run it as long as it's serviceable. Don't waste money replacing things until they wear out and become useless. Besides that the battery you're asking about costs a lot more now than the one you bought 3 years ago and it is not any better. I have one of those from Walmart in my 2010 Corolla that I bought in 2016 and it's just fine today. I paid $50 for it back then and today they want $150 for the same battery.
 

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Heat is harder on a battery than cold, I always carry a small jumper box especially when I was in Northern Wyoming and Montana. Used it a couple times over several cold winters, always got the Toyota started and home.
My last Interstate lasted for 9 years, I did replace that one out of paranoia. :cool:
Interstate made some AMAZING batteries. I had one in a car for about 8 years before replacing just to get a new one. The car was only driven about once a week. In the winter it was left on a battery tender sometimes. The new Interstate is maybe 2 years old and it does not hold as long and cranks a little slower.

No need to get a new battery if the current one works well. If you park inside overnight get a Deltran Battery Tender and hook it up. Batteries seem to lose power faster in the winter. You can get quick connects so it will be super quick.
 

· Official PITA
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The OP knows what he's talking about, especially in (literal) wilderness areas of Maine. My take is that the OP has a bad feeling (precognition?) about that battery; so you blow out $100, and possibly waste an extra year (?) of battery life. $100 / 4yr life = $25 "wasted". You could spend that $25 on antacids, or a tow P.D.Q.

((BTW... Costco still sells 24F Interstate batteries for a hair under $100, at least around N. Delaware & Phila.-- No membership? A friend can buy it for you, or you can buy a membership, then a battery, and then return the membership))
 

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My 3 year old Walmart max battery is working fine...However, will buying a fresh new battery make sense?
It often gets double digit negative zero in my area during a winter and can be dangerous if a car battery fails.

Also, because i will likely need a new battery anyways in 1 or 2 years, the price of a new battery in 1 or 2 years will likely be much higher. Buying a new battery now may save $30-50 over next years price
You made some valid points. If Walmart has it now, buy it. With my luck when I need something at Walmart it will be out of stock
 

· just a nobody
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My question to OP is, what is your battery rated for? 36 months, 48, or 60 months? I am not familiar with Walmart Max, so I don't know.
If it is rated for 36 month, which means it is close to the end of its life expentancy, so it would be a good idea to consider a replacement. If on the other hand, it is rated for 60 months....you know what I am getting at!

Even Interstate have different grades of battery, some rated longer than the other, of course with a price!

If you are often out in the rural areas, whether the battery is in good condition or not, seems like it would still be wise to have a jumper box handy!

My 2 cents!
 

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Haha I also live in Northern New England. Like I said, I just replace the battery when it goes bad. I carry a little jump pack with me too but have used it much more often on other people's cars :LOL:

The added benefit of my method is even if you leave a door open or the key on or whatever and your brand new battery is dead, you still won't be stranded.
 

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A stored battery will definitely go bad just sitting there. You'd have to get a trickle charger to keep it alive.

What keeps a battery good for years is never letting it get deeply discharged.

If your car lives outside in the cold, can you run an extension cord to a block heater and a trickle charger?

Here's a good article about battery care: https://www.batteriesplus.com/blog/power/car-battery-care

Or, what if you just got a battery now while the prices are what they are, and then just save it for later when it's actually needed? Just store it.
 

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My 3 year old Walmart max battery is working fine...However, will buying a fresh new battery make sense?
It often gets double digit negative zero in my area during a winter and can be dangerous if a car battery fails.

Also, because i will likely need a new battery anyways in 1 or 2 years, the price of a new battery in 1 or 2 years will likely be much higher. Buying a new battery now may save $30-50 over next years price
I change out my batteries every three years and have never had any of my cars fail to start because of the battery. This since 1963.
 

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Money may be better spent on a good inexpensive OBD2 tool (plugin with Bluetooth craftsman is ~50) and a rechargeable combo jumper/air pump. The OBD2 will tell you when the battery standing voltage is beginning to degrade to justify buying new battery - otherwise, kinda wasteful to toss it before you need.
 

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I was a genarator tech for 18 years. I always wrote the date on every battery I installed. I always told my customers that batteries are 4 year batteries. You may get 6-8 years out of your batteries, but you may be sitting in the dark next thunder storm. Most said go ahead and put a new battery. It was for theirs and my benefit, I hated midnight callouts.
 

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All my vehicles have portable jump starters for an eventual battery failure. That being said, I have gotten 6+ years out of several Walmart Everstart Maxx batteries. Personally, I replace when they die. Yep, its a bit inconvenient but, a new battery could fail. You can't sweat everything.
 

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My 3 year old Walmart max battery is working fine...However, will buying a fresh new battery make sense?
It often gets double digit negative zero in my area during a winter and can be dangerous if a car battery fails.

Also, because i will likely need a new battery anyways in 1 or 2 years, the price of a new battery in 1 or 2 years will likely be much higher. Buying a new battery now may save $30-50 over next years price
Why not return it to Walmart, let them put a tester on it you’ll probably be eligible for a prorated purchase towards a new, possible better battery. Unless you think it’s better to gather numerous opinions from our forum, (good as it is) I believe sleeping easy is a very good way to proceed, good luck
 

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My 3 year old Walmart max battery is working fine...However, will buying a fresh new battery make sense?
It often gets double digit negative zero in my area during a winter and can be dangerous if a car battery fails.

Also, because i will likely need a new battery anyways in 1 or 2 years, the price of a new battery in 1 or 2 years will likely be much higher. Buying a new battery now may save $30-50 over next years price
If it buys you peace of mind, fine. Otherwise, put it on a charger at home if you are able to do that so that it’s always in good shape.

FYI, lest we get all wrapped up in Walmart v. Costco v. Interstate v. Sears or whatever, ponder this from one of my Jaguar lists:

FYI, there are only three battery manufacturers left in the U.S.: Johnson Controls (now owned by a Canadian investment group), East Penn, and Exide. Between them, they make or import all of the major batteries sold in the U.S., including Interstate, Costco, Deka, Walmart EverStart, AutoZone Duralast, O'Reilly SuperStart, ACDelco, Motorcraft, DieHard, Duracell, NAPA Legend, Optima, Bosch, Champion, Mopar, Advance Autocraft, etc.

All that to say, these days brand hardly matters. Look for the highest Cold Cranking Amps (CCA), Reserve Capacity (RC) and amp-hour (A-H) ratings you can find in the H8/Group 49 size. AGM batteries will typically have lower CCA and A-H ratings than standard flooded lead acid batteries of the same size, but their RC rating will tend to be higher, which, along with a better deep-cycle capacity and charge retention may make them a good choice in many applications, especially if a car is not driven daily.

One caveat regarding AGM batteries: they typically require a charging strategy that differs from standard flooded/wet batteries, so if your original battery was not an AGM, your car's charging system may not optimally manage an AGM battery's charge. A specific Jaguar example is the X350, which was originally equipped with a Varta silver calcium technology battery that required higher-than-normal charging voltages, which AGM batteries do not tend to tolerate well over the long term.
 
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