Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 20 of 117 Posts

·
Surfing TN via iPhone
05 Tacoma DC 4x4 TRD
Joined
·
10,653 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I finally got around to replacing the stock clutch fan with a Zirgo electric fan. I used a Zirgo 16" 3300 cfm fan, and adjustable thermostat.

This mod took longer than I thought it would, but it was still way worth it. Now the engine doesn't ROAR to life like it used to. It starts up nice and easy. It's really amazing how quiet the engine is now. I can almost here crickets chirping in the background. :lol:

The engine also seems to have more pep. I don't have any dyno numbers, but I'm pretty sure that the engine accelerates and "winds up" faster.

It also warms up quicker, which is nice on a cold night like tonight. It only takes a few minutes of driving to get it up to normal temp. I drove a few miles before the fan came on. I have it set to come on at 195 degrees F. When the fan turns ON it's not that loud. It's certainly quieter than the stock fan, but still audible from the cab.

And if for some reason I need to go through deep water or mud then all I have to do is open the hood and turn the thermostat up to 240 degrees, and the fan will shut off; then I don't have to worry about water or mud tearing up the fan.

Now for the install details:

I removed the grille so I could get a little closer to the engine for reaching down in there. And for mounting the thermostat control.

Take off the engine cover.

Take off the 8 plastic pins that hold the trim piece on top of the radiator and core support. Pop up the center part of the pin with a flat head screw driver.

Pull off the little hose on the reservoir.

To get them out you have to remove the fan and the shroud at the same time. I used a ratcheting wrench to take off the 4 nuts that hold the fan on. I took off two nuts and then started the engine for a second so that the other nuts would spin around to the passenger side of the engine, where they are easier to reach. Just let the fan sit there. Then take out the two bolts that hold the shroud at the top corners. That is all that holds the shroud. The bottom part of the shroud fits into clips on each side. Just pull straight up, and bring the fan up with the shroud at the same time. There is a little nub at the bottom of the shroud that gets hung up on the bottom radator hose. Get under the front of the truck and squeeze the hose and then push up on the shroud. Now it should all come out with a little manuvering and some sweet talkin'.





Put the 4 nuts back on the pulley. The bolt studs aren't threaded all the way because of the mounting flange of the fan/clutch. So you now need to use a washer on each stud to work like a spacer. I then put red Loc-tite on the threads and tightened down the nuts.



To make the fan as efficient as possible you need to seal off any space on the sides of the fan, so that the fan can only pull air straight through the radiator. To fill in this gap I made a "donut" out of a sheet of aluminum. I used an air-shear, but tin snips should work too. I then screwed the fan to the aluminum with 8 screws. Then I bent the aluminum to fit the curves of the inside of the stock shroud. Then used Pop-rivets around the circumference to hold the aluminum to the shroud. It turned out to be pretty solid.

(For rivets that don't tighten down real well, you can place a hammer on the back side of the rivet and then hit the other side with another hammer. This will smash the rivet and make it tighten up on the metal. Stainless steel rivets will anchor down better than aluminum rivets, but they are much harder to use with a pop-rivet tool.)

Then I sealed up the circumference with some silicone to make it more secure and air tight where the aluminum and the shroud meet.







I mounted the thermostat control on the front side of part of the core support, next to the passenger-side headlight. I used an existing hole for the knob to stick through into the engine compartment. The thermostat sensor goes inside the radiator hose. I opened the petcock on the bottom drivers side and drained out a little fluid so that it wouldn't spill all over when I took off the top radiator hose. Put the sensor in, clamped it back down, filled the radiator back up with fluid. You could use a small bucket to catch the fluid underneath, and then pour it back in the top once you are ready. There is a hole in the skid plate right where the fluid drains out of the petcock. It isn't messy at all,





Then I did the wiring. I used a relay, which is connected to the ignition circuit, so that the fan will shut off whenever the engine is off. Otherwise the fan will keep running until the engine is cooled below 180 degrees; which is just a waste of battery power. Then I ran a 12 gauge power wire from the output of the relay to the positive of the fan and then the negative wire runs to the thermostat. These fans can blow either way, depending on how you have the polarity going to the fan. Be sure that the fan is blowing toward the engine, which sucks air through the radiator. This is called a pulling setup. Pulling air cools the radiator better than a pushing setup, where the fan is in front of the radiator.

Here it is all put back together.


I would certainly recommend this mod to anyone that can tackle it. I expect to get better MPG, a few more HP, and better cooling on hot days and in traffic. Oh, and the faster warm-up, and quieter engine is nice too.

:D
 

·
Don't mess with the Blue
'06 DC Sport TRD
Joined
·
1,809 Posts
very nice job. let us know how the MPG and HP gains are. Good Job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
Excellent. You should pick up a little power (less rotating mass) and also better fuel economy as well. :thumbup:
 

·
Stupid is stupid does
2008 tundra
Joined
·
5,554 Posts
nice job. But could you have used an 18" fan ? This is a mod I would do to save on gas ans to warm my truck up faster. :thumbup:


remember the ford SHO fan mod in the earlier trucks ? great mod also
 

·
3SGTE & 1GRFE
MR2 Turbo, Taco Dcab
Joined
·
793 Posts
nice. curious though, why do you have your fan set to come on at 180F? that's kind of cold for the fan to come on. the thermostat should start opening around then, but the fan should wait until closer to 210F to come on. i've seen some OEM applications where the fan doesn't come on until 230F.

-Mike
 

·
Surfing TN via iPhone
05 Tacoma DC 4x4 TRD
Joined
·
10,653 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
lotust said:
nice job. But could you have used an 18" fan ? This is a mod I would do to save on gas ans to warm my truck up faster. :thumbup:


remember the ford SHO fan mod in the earlier trucks ? great mod also
16" is plenty big for most auto applications. One 16" can easily cool a big V8. Plus a bigger fan is going to need a bigger motor and more electrical current as well. There aren't many 18" electric fans that I could find, and the ones that I did find didn't flow much air. What really matters is the CFM; how much air the fan can move. The speed of the motor and the shape of the fan blades is what matters.
 

·
Surfing TN via iPhone
05 Tacoma DC 4x4 TRD
Joined
·
10,653 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
NESW20 said:
nice. curious though, why do you have your fan set to come on at 180F? that's kind of cold for the fan to come on. the thermostat should start opening around then, but the fan should wait until closer to 210F to come on. i've seen some OEM applications where the fan doesn't come on until 230F.

-Mike
Yeah, I agree. I think 180 is too cool. I asked around but couldn't find anybody that knew what temp the coolant is supposed to run at. I don't know much about foreign engines. I guess I could try 210. What do you guys think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
I personally would not jump up to 210 without researching this. I do agree 180 is low, but somehow 195 or so might be a more reasonable place to start. The fan should only come on while idling hot and only then after a few minutes, not right away. It shouldn't run at all while you are moving and air is moving through the radiator. In cool weather, most electric fans will rarely come on, unless you do extended idling, like a traffic jam where you are not moving.
 

·
Stupid is stupid does
2008 tundra
Joined
·
5,554 Posts
Pb2theMax do you know off hand the max depth I can use? also do you know the L"xW" ?
 

·
Surfing TN via iPhone
05 Tacoma DC 4x4 TRD
Joined
·
10,653 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·

·
Engine 80 is in service
'10 FJ Cruiser 4x4
Joined
·
1,040 Posts
Awesome!

Can't wait to hear the effect on your mileage.
 

·
05 Speedwayblue X-runner
Joined
·
1,787 Posts
Pb2theMax said:
Yeah, I agree. I think 180 is too cool. I asked around but couldn't find anybody that knew what temp the coolant is supposed to run at. I don't know much about foreign engines. I guess I could try 210. What do you guys think?
I woud leave the setting where you have it now and wait and see how cool your engine stays by checking your gauge. If it doesn't reach mid you should increase the temp. :thumbup:
 

·
Surfing TN via iPhone
05 Tacoma DC 4x4 TRD
Joined
·
10,653 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
rpmspeedyBlue said:
I woud leave the setting where you have it now and wait and see how cool your engine stays by checking your gauge. If it doesn't reach mid you should increase the temp. :thumbup:
The temp guage goes up to half way no matter where I set the fan thermostat. This truck has a pretty good cooling system. In cooler weather it doesn't seem to need the fan at all.

I raised the thermostat up to about 195 and everything looks fine. The fan only came ON a few times for less than a minute.
 

·
05 Speedwayblue X-runner
Joined
·
1,787 Posts
Pb2theMax said:
The temp guage goes up to half way no matter where I set the fan thermostat. This truck has a pretty good cooling system. In cooler weather it doesn't seem to need the fan at all.

I raised the thermostat up to about 195 and everything looks fine. The fan only came ON a few times for less than a minute.
I really like the idea that you can adjust the thermostat. It would seem more practicle for people in extreme temps areas hot and cold.:thumbup:
 
1 - 20 of 117 Posts
Top