Toyota Nation Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there an upgraded front anti-sway bar available? (and a rear) I can round a corner with a bit of enthusiam and my outside mud-flap contacts the ground - I'l like a bit less body roll if possible. It's also sprung a bit soft.

If these are available, are they hard to install?
 

·
Administrator
マズダスピード3
Joined
·
14,965 Posts
I would look into ultra racing or find a Camry wagon front sway bar. The Camry is thicker I assume since it’s much heavier and longer than the corolla.
 

·
Registered
1991 Toyota Corolla GT-S
Joined
·
67 Posts
Is there an upgraded front anti-sway bar available? (and a rear) I can round a corner with a bit of enthusiam and my outside mud-flap contacts the ground - I'l like a bit less body roll if possible. It's also sprung a bit soft.

If these are available, are they hard to install?
We're probably about 10 years too late to the AE92 scene, most of the performance upgrade parts (especially for the chassis) have been discontinued for awhile unfortunately. I was looking to refresh/upgrade the suspension on my GTS back in Feb-March and there wasn't much choice even for stock replacement parts. If I remember correctly, the entire strut assembly from the AE101 and AE111 can work with our cars, not sure if that opens up some other options. BC Racing and Fortune Auto make coilovers for these cars, but those will quickly outpace the cost of the car lol. Whiteline also makes some suspension bits including adjustable anti-sway bar links that are still available.

This sticky has some good part number information though, you might be able to search up the part numbers and find something: AE92 Master part number Database

As for install, if the anti-sway bar or links are made to fit the car it shouldn't be too bad. The anti-sway bar is usually attached with two links (to the control arm or strut on each side, shown below) and two bushings/clamps to the crossmember underneath. The hardest part is removing the stock anti-sway bar links. They have an allen key insert in the ball stud to hold it still while you loosen the nut holding it to the sway bar/control arm. Most of the time they're rusted out and the stud just starts spinning when you go to turn them, making it a right pain to get off. But you can always cut them off if you have to so it's really not too bad of a job. You'll just need to put the front of the car on jackstands and remove the wheels, which will give you pretty much all the access you need to remove the anti-sway bar and links.
Automotive tire Light Black Motor vehicle Tread
 

·
Registered
1992 Geo Prizm
Joined
·
3,455 Posts
We're probably about 10 years too late to the AE92 scene, most of the performance upgrade parts (especially for the chassis) have been discontinued for awhile unfortunately. I was looking to refresh/upgrade the suspension on my GTS back in Feb-March and there wasn't much choice even for stock replacement parts. If I remember correctly, the entire strut assembly from the AE101 and AE111 can work with our cars, not sure if that opens up some other options. BC Racing and Fortune Auto make coilovers for these cars, but those will quickly outpace the cost of the car lol. Whiteline also makes some suspension bits including adjustable anti-sway bar links that are still available.

This sticky has some good part number information though, you might be able to search up the part numbers and find something: AE92 Master part number Database

As for install, if the anti-sway bar or links are made to fit the car it shouldn't be too bad. The anti-sway bar is usually attached with two links (to the control arm or strut on each side, shown below) and two bushings/clamps to the crossmember underneath. The hardest part is removing the stock anti-sway bar links. They have an allen key insert in the ball stud to hold it still while you loosen the nut holding it to the sway bar/control arm. Most of the time they're rusted out and the stud just starts spinning when you go to turn them, making it a right pain to get off. But you can always cut them off if you have to so it's really not too bad of a job. You'll just need to put the front of the car on jackstands and remove the wheels, which will give you pretty much all the access you need to remove the anti-sway bar and links.
View attachment 357977
The links are still available thru MOOG. I bought new ones when I did my rear struts. My Honda got new end links on both ends from MOOG. If you have the new parts, it's easier to just cut off the nuts, and replace them completely. You'll spend less time doing that.
 

·
Registered
1991 Toyota Corolla GT-S
Joined
·
67 Posts
The links are still available thru MOOG. I bought new ones when I did my rear struts. My Honda got new end links on both ends from MOOG. If you have the new parts, it's easier to just cut off the nuts, and replace them completely. You'll spend less time doing that.
Yep, MOOG and others still make stock replacement parts. I have MOOG, and maybe Mevotech links? Not sure how much they'll help stiffen the ride for OP though since they're just OE equivalent. I suppose if his were completely trashed then it'd be a significant upgrade lol
 
  • Like
Reactions: Corrolla clone

·
Registered
1992 Geo Prizm
Joined
·
3,455 Posts
Yep, MOOG and others still make stock replacement parts. I have MOOG, and maybe Mevotech links? Not sure how much they'll help stiffen the ride for OP though since they're just OE equivalent. I suppose if his were completely trashed then it'd be a significant upgrade lol
My Honda still had OE parts under it. The plastic separated from the steel cup on those. I've seen the same thing happen on a Camry (same design).
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top