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I bought a 100,000mile 93camry sedan with a leaking radiator and leaking brake line for $500 from an old lady. The fuel and brake lines look rusted, so I am going to replace the main lines under the car.

I have never replaced a brake/fuel line, but I can't imagine that it would be any more difficult than swapping an engine, or changing a timing belt which I have done.

Is there a site with directions on how to change these important lines? I am sure that the brake line connections must withstand lots of pressure so I would like to know how I should approach each line.

Do most auto parts stores carry large sections of these lines?

Any tips or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Brake lines:

there's 3 ways, depending on how much of a DIY'er you are.

1) buy pre-bent lines with fittings already flared on. Most expensive way for parts alone, likely special order, but easiest and fastest. Toyota and most major parts stores should have it. Install per your TSRM/Haynes. Don't strip the fittings or you'll hate your life, and don't use teflon tape to seal the threads.

2) buy un bent lines with fittings on. You have to measure yours (diameter and length), and need a tube bender (pliers type). Cheaper parts cost, but the bender will run 15-20. Upside is you'll need the benders for the fuel later. To install, remove yours, bend the new one to match and install. Still quite simple. Same note on overtightening.

3) bulk line and loose fittings. You'll need a flare tool, and need to find out the flare size, and need to know the fitting size. You'll also need a tube cutter and the bender. Bend to fit, cut to length and flare the fittings on. Low cost on the parts, but the tools will be more than the pre bent. Again, the upside is you can use it all on the fuel line too, and there may be overall cost savings after doing a few.

Bleed as normal and test drive. Check for leaks on return from a short trip. You may want to stand hard on them when sitting in the driveway to see if panic stops will cause leaks. If none, have a beer, wait an hour and hit the track :)

Fuel:

1) again, pre made line should be available from Toyota, and maybe parts stores. Same as above on cost and ease of install.

2) cut out only the section that has rusted out and ignore fittings. Get the correct diameter line, a foot of high pressure fuel hose with the same ID as the line has OD, 4 fuel hose clamps (there is a difference). Cut out the section with the tube cutter (do not use shear type cutters on brake or fuel lines). Bend the line as/if required with the bender. Slip small pieces of the hose over the cut ends of the lines, put in the new hose section and tighten all the clamps down (the hose is a union for the patch). Start it up and check for leaks. Watch over the next week for any signs the unions leak or are failing in any way (I'd carry the extra hose, some clamps and a screwdriver for a little while).

Notes on the fuel line: Gas will spill...keep fire equipment handy, and relieve the pressure before starting this by trying to start the car with the fuel pump fuse removed. When it dies (10 seconds tops) you're ready.

HTH,

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That was very nice of you Bob! Thanks a million
 
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