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Discussion Starter #1
I'm pretty new to Arizona and this is my first oil change since coming here. This summer is about 90-120F degrees. Damn hot =/

Looking for suggestions on my 2001 Tundra with 30k miles and my mom's 95 Corolla with 100k miles.

Are those high mileage oils a bunch of marketing bs or do they actualy help ?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Supra
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Marketing BS. Your car was designed to use specific weights of oils in an environment, and those appear in your owner's manual, and cover as high as you experience. Once you find the weight, specify that. The corolla however, may need to step up one weight level if it uses some at it's milage.
 

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^
Actually, most high mileage oils aren't. They do have a blend that is less harsh on the engine. But normal oil or synthetic will do just as well. As long as you don't beat on the car.

Your environment doesn't really affect your motor oil unless it is very cold. No matter how hot it is outside, your engine will still run at 100's of degrees. So just run what your engine says for the correct weight to use. 10w-30 or something around there should be fine. I run 5w-30 myself.
 

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most new cars....the manufacturers will always tell u that no oil change is needed for XXXX amount of kms....thats just pure BS to get u to delay oil changes and have the cars break down in the future.....stick to a reg oil change routine......for reg oil...no more than 5000km intervals....with synthetic....no more than 3500kms...thats the rule of thumb i try to stick with.....
 

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MRQturbo said:
stick to a reg oil change routine......for reg oil...no more than 5000km intervals....with synthetic....no more than 3500kms...thats the rule of thumb i try to stick with.....

question.......why synthetic oil require more frequency oil change than regular oil???
 

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^^oops..i worded that wrong....its the opposite....with synthetic u can run longer intervals because it does burn as much or break down as fast as conventional motor oil......
 

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try using Amsoil synthetic. years ago when i was involved with 2 race cars & my own rally car, we found that Amsoil generally ran 30-40 degrees cooler than mobil of the same weight.
 

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Hey Q! He's a noob who lives in Arizona. Best bet is he is confused as hell by you giving him it in Km :)
 

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oil is oil.. just run what the book tells you to and change it evry 3000 milles. dosent matter if you burn it or not.
 

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I'm over in Texas where it is presently 97 with a heat index of 107:rolleyes:

:cool: <--- I wear those a lot:lol:

Anyway, I use Mobil 1 10W-30 and have had no problems at all in high temps. I don't think you'll have a problem with any particular brand as long as you use the right weight.
 

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Blek, the biggest problem in Arizona will be the dirt,dust and sand that your engine will injest. That stuff also eats the paint off your car in sand storms (I know, it ate the paint and windshield off my old shelby cobra gt350) back in 1969.
 

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csaxon said:
Blek, the biggest problem in Arizona will be the dirt,dust and sand that your engine will injest. That stuff also eats the paint off your car in sand storms (I know, it ate the paint and windshield off my old shelby cobra gt350) back in 1969.
NOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! *cough*even though it is only a GT350 *cough* NOOOOOOOOO!!!!! SHELBY!!!!!!!!
 

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The Regenerator
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I'd recommend German Castrol Syntec. Wait, No, this isn't the phony Group-III hydrocracked oil that Castrol is selling under the Syntec name in the usual grades. This one comes only in the 0w-30 grade, but when hot, it specs out at the high end of the 30 wt range, almost qualifying as a 40. It's called SLX in Germany, and it meets the ACEA A3 spec (which means it should hold up for about 10,000 miles). So far, I've only seen it in the states in Autozone stores. But you have to be careful, as there's a US made 0w-30, distinguished by a yellow-detailed label, that's sometimes mixed in with the German Castrol. Check every bottle for "Made in Germany" on the back. This stuff is a hard-core Group IV/V Synthetic that has performed beautifully in my V-6 Camry.

Want some objective indication of its performance? Here's a used oil analysis report I just got back from the lab. The oil produced fantastic results over 5,300 miles in the almost-hot-as-Texas heat of Gulf Coast Louisiana and Florida. Here's the report (I posted it in another thread in the Camry section, my apologies for the double):

 

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The Regenerator
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Oh yeah, one other neat, but slightly spooky, detail about German Castrol: it comes out of the bottle a deep emrald green instead of the usual amber. Really.
 

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Zrain said:
oil is oil.. just run what the book tells you to and change it evry 3000 milles. dosent matter if you burn it or not.
With all due respect, no. Go over to Bobistheoilguy.com and check out the Used Oil Analysis section. You can find dozens of reports like mine above indicating decent performance on mineral oils, but also that the syns consistently last longer, and usually perform better (lower wear metals, insolubles, TBN retention, etc.). Also, there's a startling range of performance across brands.

Don't just rely on old speculative stories your Grandpa told. Go check out some objective evidence. Then you can make an informed choice about what oil to put in your engine. :cool:
 

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trust me, Oil Is OIL

all that green Wonder shit is why touareg and and Cyans get mottor sawps more often then any other SUV i know. im sory but that green crap need alital more R&D im shure on paper is cool, but go into the shop and see what it dose 60k later.

Oil has a simple job, and when you start geting all complicated with the weight and type you need to realize that a billion more man hours went into that exact problum and thats why your book tells you the weight to use.... sythetic is nice but thats becuse it LASTS longer. if you need to use oil that changes weight acording to temp, thats just scary as hell. i know as a gear head that a mottor will have X gap between all moving parts, and that those gaps need to let oil flow threw them. using an oil of Y weight i can inshure that those gaps will be lubricated. the only thing i need to wory about this tempture.. witch i can easly control with the use of coolers.

id rather burn oil and leek it as apose to burning no oil and not leeking it. burning tells me its geting to all the little parts. and leeking tells me that to. dont get me wrong leeking oil is never a good thing, nore is burning a large amount of it. but any one who troubles them selfs over leeking a bit of oil and or bruning alital is just asking for more problums if the go ahead and change the weight.

another thing people dont understand. WARM UP YOUR FREEKING CAR. if you drive your car often and dont have time to warm it up, just drive it so that it dosen go past more then 3000RPM's this gives the oil time to warm up. along with the coolent. floging a cold mottor is what hurts cars the most, and no magic oil is going to fix that.
 

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Zrain said:
trust me, Oil Is OIL

all that green Wonder shit is why touareg and and Cyans get mottor sawps more often then any other SUV i know. im sory but that green crap need alital more R&D im shure on paper is cool, but go into the shop and see what it dose 60k later.

Oil has a simple job, and when you start geting all complicated with the weight and type you need to realize that a billion more man hours went into that exact problum and thats why your book tells you the weight to use.... sythetic is nice but thats becuse it LASTS longer. if you need to use oil that changes weight acording to temp, thats just scary as hell. i know as a gear head that a mottor will have X gap between all moving parts, and that those gaps need to let oil flow threw them. using an oil of Y weight i can inshure that those gaps will be lubricated. the only thing i need to wory about this tempture.. witch i can easly control with the use of coolers.

id rather burn oil and leek it as apose to burning no oil and not leeking it. burning tells me its geting to all the little parts. and leeking tells me that to. dont get me wrong leeking oil is never a good thing, nore is burning a large amount of it. but any one who troubles them selfs over leeking a bit of oil and or bruning alital is just asking for more problums if the go ahead and change the weight.

another thing people dont understand. WARM UP YOUR FREEKING CAR. if you drive your car often and dont have time to warm it up, just drive it so that it dosen go past more then 3000RPM's this gives the oil time to warm up. along with the coolent. floging a cold mottor is what hurts cars the most, and no magic oil is going to fix that.
Z:

You make some good points, but when I've seen a couple hundred of these reports that DO show significant differences, well, I'm going with those. Please go here and see for yourself: Used Oil Analysis Reports

You're right about engine starting. Failure to warm up properly can cause significant damage and shorten engine life. Gentle warmups help greatly. So does a Group-IV/V synthetic that has absolutely zero wax in it. Once the pour point depressants in a mineral oil deplete (usually one of the first additives to "wear out," as they're pretty unstable), the wax that remained after refining can significantly slow oil flow as the engine warms. Group-III hydrocracked oils (mineral oil "extra"refined and sold as syn) are also getting better in this regard.

You're also right that no oil is "magic." I never said any was. I mentioned the green color for fun, and I think that should have been clear. What matters is performance. Performance can be measured by the type of report I posted. Do you have any similar evidence to back up your opinions?

You also said, "if you need to use oil that changes weight acording to temp, thats just scary as hell." Not really. All oils, multi-grade or straight weight will change absolute viscosity with temperature. This characteristic is measured by us with a standard known as Viscosity Index. Engineers try to improve durability and performance by specifying an oil that will both flow acceptably when cold, and keep metal separated when hot parts are moving at high speed. Synthetics, by the way, have a naturally good VI, and unlike most mineral oils, don't need a bunch of unstable sludge prone additives to make them "multi-grade."

And you said, "any one who troubles them selfs over leeking a bit of oil and or bruning alital is just asking for more problums if the go ahead and change the weight." For the most part, you're right. I'd agree that you should stay within mfr recommendations for oil viscosity. That said, and although I probably wouldn't do it, I've seen plenty of UOA lab reports that indicate you're just fine using a slightly thicker or thinner oil, if conditions (very extreme heat or cold) dictate.

Well, that's probably enough for one post...:rolleyes: . In truth, there's less absolute difference between oils than the oil advertising folks would have us believe. On the other hand, there's just no comparison between the abilities of a good synthethc (Mobil, Motul, Redline, Ams, etc.) and a $0.79 el cheapo you find in the convenience, as long as the good oil is used within its limits (no oil is magic or perfect).

Edited for typo.
 

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Since Blek asked for a recommendation for his Tundra, here's the recent report on my wife's '01 Sequoia. If Blek's Tundra has the V-8 option, this is exactly the same engine. This is with 5w-30 Mobil-1. Oil has gone 4,200 miles and been in for about eight months. Note the very low wear and still-high TBN (acid absorbing ability). This engine uses absolutely zero oil, and has been on twice a year oil changes all its life (post break in). BTW, all those "big" numbers are part of the Mobil-1 formulation, not wear metals.

 

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ok.. let me adjust my staitments abit. ive pulled apart 911 flat 6's and done the rebiulds with some realy expensive oil in the past. and yes, in those case's the stuff realy dose help. but we always did the change over to Mobil-1 after the brake in period. this was BC all the parts had shifted and seteld as they are ment to. and the motors where not high end race motors. nore is most peoples car's. a tundra aspeshaly. the econimy behind spending $5+ on a Quort of oil is just not there. if a motor was ment to use a serton expensive oil, then it would come from the factory that way. Example - VW Toureg and the Porsche Cayenne (v6 cheepO model).

honestly i know some guys who biuld with natrual light whight oil and then convert it over to synthetc of a hevyer whight.

the reason i say Oil is Oil, is BC the $1 bottel, and the $3 bottels dont have that much of a difrence between them. and trust me theres nothing in that $5+ dollor bottel worth dumping into your car.
 

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I'd agree that the difference certainly isn't as big as the advertising guys want us to believe. On the other hand, the choices, at least for me, aren't driven by oil cost alone. As you can see from the Sequoia UOA report, reflecting a test done on approx eight month old oil, I am now essentially sure that I can leave oil in this car for a year, if I want to, no problem. You could never do that with a dino oil, it's TBN would be gone in 3-6 months. And since I've got objective proof of this, I can do it without worry. Frankly, saving the time spent on three more dino changes is worth it to me for that reason alone.

But I'd readily agree that used carefully, this engine and many others would do fine on dino. The sludge-prone 5S-FE and early 1MZ-FEs are also good candidates for synthetic as anti-sludge measure, though. In the end, most owners should do what makes them comfortable, assuming it's not insane (like 50,000 change intervals...).
 
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