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The second link was less than a paragraph. Not much info.

Given the history of an airbag, the crash sensor location is crucial to sense the impact in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The second link was less than a paragraph. Not much info.

Given the history of an airbag, the crash sensor location is crucial to sense the impact in the first place.
The information in the second link is in the video.
Click on the photo to start playing the video.
It mentions Corollas as being involved.
 

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2006 Corolla XRS
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The second link was less than a paragraph. Not much info.

Given the history of an airbag, the crash sensor location is crucial to sense the impact in the first place.
The information in the second link is in the video.
Click on the photo to start playing the video.
It mentions Corollas as being involved.
Didn't even see a video. Sorry. Read the article though
 

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2018 Corolla LE
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FCA had on its own recalled 1.4 million in connection with the problem in 2016. Since then, the NHTSA has recorded no subsequent airbag-related issues in FCA Group vehicles.

In 2018, Hyundai recalled the 2011 Sonata, and sibling brand Kia recalled the 2012-13 Forte, covering 425,000 vehicles in total, to rectify the defect.
So these devices were used in cars other than FCA. Kia and Hyundai, but not only weren't those other cars recalled, but the devices continued to be installed in newly manufactured vehicles.


Just F***ing lovely. Good job, NHTSA, Toyota, Honda, etc.
 

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So these devices were used in cars other than FCA. Kia and Hyundai, but not only weren't those other cars recalled, but the devices continued to be installed in newly manufactured vehicles. Just F***ing lovely. Good job, NHTSA, Toyota, Honda, etc.
If things were that simple. Those first FCA recalled models had a brand specific control unit from a particular ZF supplier, that was believed to be the culprit. Only recently did new cases show that the control unit had problems whatever batch or supplier they came from. Nobody knows why at this point. Aggravating as it might be, it takes time and, sadly, cases, to sort these things out. Like for Takata, it could become exponential over the next months, if not years (there are still plenty of Takata's awaiting for a fix on the road). In those circumstances, nobody is clearly off the hook, including those recalled FCA on an assumption that is now questioned.
 

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In those circumstances, nobody is clearly off the hook, including those recalled FCA on an assumption that is now questioned.

How is FCA still on the hook? Is it now thought that the replacement units are also defective?


Separately, this is really bad because not only does the device control the airbag, it also does the seat-belt pre-tensioning. So the seat-belt and the airbag can *both* fail to activate to keep you in place.


This has some particular significance to me: I was in an accident where I know the seat-belt and airbag saved me from serious injury or death. The car was totaled, the hood was folded up - I walked away from it. I am dismayed at the thought that my 2018 Corolla may lack this protection that has been built into (American) cars since Sept 1 1998. (Toyotas had them somewhat later.)


See also:
 

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How is FCA still on the hook? Is it now thought that the replacement units are also defective?
Speculation at this point but a real possibility, since it is now known that the new part doesn't prevent the malfunction in other brands either. Where is the flaw then? What conditions triggers the malfunction (since they do work in most situations)? So yes, previous recall or not, FCA are part of the current probe as well.
 

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One of the articles previously linked said (or guessed?) that they were looking at electrical overloads or spikes that occurred during the crash. That is going to be an expensive issue to troubleshoot.


This is a terrible thing hanging over these cars and us.
 

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From the previously linked https://www.auto123.com/en/news/nhtsa-investigation-defective-airbags-fca-honda-toyota/65833/
At the heart of the issue is an electrical defect that could prevent the airbag from deploying. As well, the seatbelts would not in that case tighten up as they normally would in reaction to a collision.
No airbags and no seat-belts. We're almost back to early 1960s level of safety. We've got better construction that maintains integrity of the occupant compartment, so we don't end up with engine in our laps or the front wheels coming in at us, (as seen in the 1998 model in the video above) but (as far as I know, which isn't necessarily very far at all) that's about it - and that doesn't help much if you've flown through windshield, or collided with the steering wheel/dashboard/whatever.


ETA: Yes, I do have an anxiety disorder. What makes you ask?
 

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So there is a little bit of good news:

The seat belt on my 2018 LE at least has an inertial reel lock, as described here. If I pull the belt out rapidly, it stops after an inch or 2. This isn't as good as the a working pre-tensioner system, as described here, but it does prevent flying out the window and, possibly, hitting the steering wheel.
 
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