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Pkrface. Which tire out of the 2 have you had. Thanks again.
Both. I like the WeatherReady better because it rides firmer and handles more crisp. That's just a personal preference.
 

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Pkrface. I have a question. You would know. You are a former tire guy. Years ago my mother had the Yokohama Avid ascend tires. They are a Lrr tire. Brand new in rain snow and ice the tires drove like they were bald. These were the worst tires I ever had.
I am just asking. The LRR tires they are supposed to give you better mpg. Now prkface what I don’t know is you can tell me. Since these tires give you better mpg are they terrible in snow and rain.
I would never buy those again. Thanks.
 

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Ok. I just looked those tires up. Sorry are they called the Goodyear assurance weather ready. Also are they all weather or not. Thanks.
 

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Yes, the WeatherReady is an all-weather tire.

On your LRR question, all features engineered into a tire are done at the compromise of something else. Softer rubber compounds and more aggressive tread patterns give better grip, but don't last as long. Harder rubber compounds and less aggressive tread patterns last longer, but give up grip in pretty much all driving conditions. With an economical car you may not have enough power to feel the loss of grip on dry pavement in warm weather, but wet or cold and wet you definitely will feel that. Both LRR and tires that focus on a high tread wear warranty focus specifically on harder rubber compounds and a tread pattern that is not aggressive to get those features. Tires that focus on a super smooth, quiet ride give up crisp handling and good road feel. How you drive (easy vs aggressive) and how diligent you are with rotations (every 5-6K miles) can also directly impact tire life. Add in the fact that the asphalt mixture used for the roads can vary quite a bit depending on where in the country you live and that can also play a significant part in what tires work well in your particular area. Philly isn't much different than where I live.

All of this is why those who are looking for specific features are best off engaging someone knowledgeable about tires to guide them, but there are plenty of people out there who can't tell the difference from one tire to the next unless they have an experience like you had with those Avids. There are other tires in the Avid line that are an excellent choice by the way and my brother has one he really liked until I flipped him to the RT43. First drive and he was "wow" what a difference.
 

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counterattack
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I really like Michelin Premier A/S but I have only gotten like 25k miles and two years before almost hitting the wear indicators. They are really grippy in the warm and wet. And the road noise is terrific. I'm wondering if constantly driving in the +80 weather had an effect on wear. I do drive a bit sporty but nothing crazy but I still don't think that would leave me with the mileage I got. Others have also reported abysmal mileage from these tires as well. I would buy again though just because they perform so well in the dry and wet and they are quiet and comfortable.
 

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Pkrface. I would never get LRR tires again. They are horrible in rain snow and ice.
How are the triple tread tires you had on the Honda oddesy.
My friend has Michelin defender. He likes them.
 

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Pkrface. I would never get LRR tires again. They are horrible in rain snow and ice.
How are the triple tread tires you had on the Honda oddesy.
My friend has Michelin defender. He likes them.
Best tire I have ever owned hands down. Great wear, firm ride and crisp handling, very good on snow/ice, and fabulous on wet roads. Sliced right through the water. Driving in the rain the only reason to slow down was traffic or visibility. Nothing wrong with the RT43s, but I really miss the TripleTreds. If the WeatherReady would have come in a size I could have made work I would have done it. I could have changed wheels and gone to 18", but that was too much cost to swallow for a 220K mile van.
 

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I don’t think the triple tread come in my size 195 65 r15. But I don’t know.
I never tried an all weather tire. I would like to. Probably one of the best type of tires out there.
 

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I don’t think the triple tread come in my size 195 65 r15. But I don’t know.
I never tried an all weather tire. I would like to. Probably one of the best type of tires out there.
The TripleTred was updated to the WeatherReady about two years ago and it does come in the 195/65-15.. They don't make the TripleTred anymore. I have an almost new set of 195/65-15 TripleTreds, but they are on my son's 2003 Chevrolet Malibu. Sorry, you can't have them!
 

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Ah, I can’t have them. Lol. The only good year tires I ever had were eagle ls2. They were good. I really appreciate the help. Thanks
 

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Ah, I can’t have them. Lol. The only good year tires I ever had were eagle ls2. They were good. I really appreciate the help. Thanks
That's funny, the LS and LS2 tires are pretty crappy IMO. To each his own I guess.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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Pkrface. I have a question. You would know. You are a former tire guy. Years ago my mother had the Yokohama Avid ascend tires. They are a Lrr tire. Brand new in rain snow and ice the tires drove like they were bald. These were the worst tires I ever had.
I am just asking. The LRR tires they are supposed to give you better mpg. Now prkface what I don’t know is you can tell me. Since these tires give you better mpg are they terrible in snow and rain.
I would never buy those again. Thanks.
I've had a lot of experience with LRR tires on our Prius and following a lot of information on the Prius forums. The Prius is very sensitive to difference tires. I do have a set of LRR Yokohama Avid Ascend tires on it right now. I put them on last year and they've been just fine so far. I did have a set of Michelin Energy Saver 195/65R15 that where very nice and in all the testing did produce the best MPG of any LRR tire. I had a set of 16" JDM wheels made for the Prius that my wife loved so I put a set of 195/60R16 Yokohama Avid Ascends on them. The Avid tires have been very good in the rain and on dry roads. We get plenty of rain here in WA State so that is always important. I would never use any A/S tire in winter months so I have a set of 195/65R15 Michelin X-Ice 3 winter tires for those colder months. Now keep in mind that my wife doesn't drive her Prius like I do my cars but I do drive her Prius so I know how it feels.
 

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I've had a lot of experience with LRR tires on our Prius and following a lot of information on the Prius forums. The Prius is very sensitive to difference tires. I do have a set of LRR Yokohama Avid Ascend tires on it right now. I put them on last year and they've been just fine so far. I did have a set of Michelin Energy Saver 195/65R15 that where very nice and in all the testing did produce the best MPG of any LRR tire. I had a set of 16" JDM wheels made for the Prius that my wife loved so I put a set of 195/60R16 Yokohama Avid Ascends on them. The Avid tires have been very good in the rain and on dry roads. We get plenty of rain here in WA State so that is always important. I would never use any A/S tire in winter months so I have a set of 195/65R15 Michelin X-Ice 3 winter tires for those colder months. Now keep in mind that my wife doesn't drive her Prius like I do my cars but I do drive her Prius so I know how it feels.
A lot of it comes down to what you are used to. Someone who is used to LRR tires and how they perform doesn't know how much better a really good all season tire can be just the same as someone who has never had winter tires can't understand how much difference they can make. If you are going to run LRR or summer tires the other 3 seasons then winter tires are a must. To me running a really good all season or all weather tire all year and not having the extra hassle of winter tires works well for me. Winter driving skill varies significantly from one person to the next, but I can easily drive faster than most other drivers are willing to drive in snow with the tires I have picked and you can't drive faster than other traffic no matter how badly you want to.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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Yes, the WeatherReady is an all-weather tire.

On your LRR question, all features engineered into a tire are done at the compromise of something else. Softer rubber compounds and more aggressive tread patterns give better grip, but don't last as long. Harder rubber compounds and less aggressive tread patterns last longer, but give up grip in pretty much all driving conditions. With an economical car you may not have enough power to feel the loss of grip on dry pavement in warm weather, but wet or cold and wet you definitely will feel that. Both LRR and tires that focus on a high tread wear warranty focus specifically on harder rubber compounds and a tread pattern that is not aggressive to get those features. Tires that focus on a super smooth, quiet ride give up crisp handling and good road feel. How you drive (easy vs aggressive) and how diligent you are with rotations (every 5-6K miles) can also directly impact tire life. Add in the fact that the asphalt mixture used for the roads can vary quite a bit depending on where in the country you live and that can also play a significant part in what tires work well in your particular area. Philly isn't much different than where I live.

All of this is why those who are looking for specific features are best off engaging someone knowledgeable about tires to guide them, but there are plenty of people out there who can't tell the difference from one tire to the next unless they have an experience like you had with those Avids. There are other tires in the Avid line that are an excellent choice by the way and my brother has one he really liked until I flipped him to the RT43. First drive and he was "wow" what a difference.
This is just what most people don't understand. You said it well but people want one tire that does everything the best and that doesn't exist. There are always trade offs. And as you said the pavement makes a huge difference. We have all experienced that noisy pavement and then it changes and it's quiet as a mouse.

Tires have come a long way in the 40 years that I've been driving and since I used to sell them back in the late 80's but I've always stayed informed and up to date. I have several friends that work at Discount Tire so we are always talking tires. This is why I stayed with a new set of Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+ tires on my 2009 Corolla S Turbo 5MT. When I just did my 5300 mile trip around the US they amazed me time after time with their grip and steering feel and turn in. Simply amazing.
 

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A lot of it comes down to what you are used to. Someone who is used to LRR tires and how they perform doesn't know how much better a really good all season tire can be just the same as someone who has never had winter tires can't understand how much difference they can make. If you are going to run LRR or summer tires the other 3 seasons then winter tires are a must. To me running a really good all season or all weather tire all year and not having the extra hassle of winter tires works well for me. Winter driving skill varies significantly from one person to the next, but I can easily drive faster than most other drivers are willing to drive in snow with the tires I have picked and you can't drive faster than other traffic no matter how badly you want to.
I'm very experienced with different types of tires and having owned 6-8 cars most of my life I use the type of tire that I use the car for. I've also spent many years auto crossing and I sure can tell a lot about different performance tires on my cars over the years.

I know that many people live in areas that don't need winter tires and an A/S tire will work for them as they live south of the snow belt. I just get tired of people that think they can drive the way they do in snow and they end up causing accidents because they don't have a clue that the biggest benefit of winter tires is that they allow you to brake and steer a lot better than a A/S or A/W tire. One accident because someone couldn't stop in time will pay for a set of winter tires and then some. I had 2 people that live on the next street over both slide into each other several years ago and they both had AWD Subarus. I stopped and talked to them and they both asked how I stopped so easily on the hill in my Corolla. They both ended up buying a set of winter tires and as I saw them after that they were amazed at the difference the winter tires made. Going fast in snow doesn't matter, but being able to stop quicker is!
 

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Pkrface and supercharge. I really appreciate the help. You guys are former tire guys and know more than I do. Thanks for the recommendation. I will look into all the tires you guys recommended. Thanks.
 

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Pkrface. If you don’t mind I have a question. If a tire is a 75,000 mile tire. How do you get 75,000 miles out of the tire. So what I am asking is if you buy a certain mileage tire how do you get that amount of miles out of the tire with out falling short. Thanks.
 

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Pkrface. If you don’t mind I have a question. If a tire is a 75,000 mile tire. How do you get 75,000 miles out of the tire. So what I am asking is if you buy a certain mileage tire how do you get that amount of miles out of the tire with out falling short. Thanks.
The biggest factors are mile type, road surface, alignment accuracy, and driving style. If you have lots of local trips, you are an aggressive driver, and let's say you live in the south west US where the roads, in order to hold up to high heat, have an asphalt mix that has large stones in the mix to extend the life of the pavement then tires on those roads will never last as long as areas in the north where they use smaller pebbles in the mix and less of them because they need the asphalt to be softer to deal with the freeze/thaw cycles. Concrete roads are even harder on tires than asphalt, but people in the south west frequently get 1/2 or less of the rated tread wear rating.

In Philly obviously it will be alignment, mile type and driving style, but regular rotations are also a big factor. Make sure you rotate every 5-6K miles. For many years I have been in the habit of oil change/tire rotation every 5K miles and it has served me well. The TripleTreds on my wife's van that would have made 100K miles had it not been for a sidewall puncture and had 81K on them when that happened still had 7/32 tread left. That is mainly attributable to my wife being an easy driver, though many buyers of that tire were impressed by the long wear of it. The mile mix on that was near 50/50 local/highway. Personally I don't run tires below 5/32 tread as wet and snow traction (especially braking) suffers too much below that.

Just clarify my suggestions for you, I have had many other brands over the years including Firestone, Bridgestone, Michelin, Yokohama, and Cooper. In most cases multiple sets. I have been a field sales rep for 20+ years and average 40-50K miles a year which gives you opportunity to drive many different vehicles and lots of tires. Tires being matched to the particular vehicle are important too. Using a tire primarily designed for a sedan rarely works well on a heavier vehicle like an SUV or van and of course the same is true for putting an SUV/Truck tire on a car. Putting a run of the mill passenger car tire on a sports car doesn't work either, so all that is taken into consideration when recommending a tire.
 
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