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Prkface. I like talking to you. You are telling me more than I know.
Pkrface. Alignment. Now should people get an alignment every time they get new tires.
 

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Prkface. I like talking to you. You are telling me more than I know.
Pkrface. Alignment. Now should people get an alignment every time they get new tires.
Yep, at least every set of tires plus anytime you know you hit a really hard pothole, curb, etc., or observe tire wear that indicates an alignment issue. Most shops are good about advising on alignment settings where they may not be perfectly in spec, but won't wear tires and won't create a pull in the cases where there is enough wear that adjustments are maxed out.
 

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First do you mind answering my questions. I really appreciate it.
My wife has a 2011 Subaru Forester. The last time it got tires we took it to my mechanic Tom. We got cooper CS5 tires. I asked to also have an alignment done. When they called and said the car was finished. They said they did not do the alignment because the mechanic drove the car and felt it did not need one. If we drive the car and feel that it still needs an alignment feel free to call back and they would do one.
Pkrface what is good mileage out of tires on awd suv. We are getting 27-30,000. Thanks.
 

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First do you mind answering my questions. I really appreciate it.
My wife has a 2011 Subaru Forester. The last time it got tires we took it to my mechanic Tom. We got cooper CS5 tires. I asked to also have an alignment done. When they called and said the car was finished. They said they did not do the alignment because the mechanic drove the car and felt it did not need one. If we drive the car and feel that it still needs an alignment feel free to call back and they would do one.
Pkrface what is good mileage out of tires on awd suv. We are getting 27-30,000. Thanks.
To extend the life of tires is to rotate every other oil change interval. But in the case of the Forester, it's awd. Rotation will not be needed since all the tires would wear the same until the computer senses loss of traction in either axle.

The Corolla can get an extended life through rotations.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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Pkrface. If you don’t mind I have a question. If a tire is a 75,000 mile tire. How do you get 75,000 miles out of the tire. So what I am asking is if you buy a certain mileage tire how do you get that amount of miles out of the tire with out falling short. Thanks.
I'll also chime in. I get my tires from Discount Tire and if a tire doesn't last for the mileage warranty they prorate the difference and apply that amount to my next purchase. For example, my last set of Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 tires had a 45k mile warranty but I got around 38k miles so they prorated the difference to 45k miles and I applied that money to my new set.

Another thing to remember is that tires also have to be changed with time too. Usually at 7 years tires need to be replaced due to the rubber breaking down. So when picking a tire get one that also works for your miles that you drive. If you get a 75k mile tire but only drive 40k miles in 7 years then it's a waste so just keep that in mind when looking.
 

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First do you mind answering my questions. I really appreciate it.
My wife has a 2011 Subaru Forester. The last time it got tires we took it to my mechanic Tom. We got cooper CS5 tires. I asked to also have an alignment done. When they called and said the car was finished. They said they did not do the alignment because the mechanic drove the car and felt it did not need one. If we drive the car and feel that it still needs an alignment feel free to call back and they would do one.
Pkrface what is good mileage out of tires on awd suv. We are getting 27-30,000. Thanks.
The W rated tires are rated at 50k miles and the V/H rated tires are rated at 70k miles. If you are only getting 30k miles I would think something is off unless the road surfaces you travel on are terrible. I do recommend that you have the alignment checked if nothing else. My shop will check my alignment for free and only if it needs adjusting do I pay for the alignment. I've had times when nothing felt off but the alignment was off so always check. I would think less of this shop for doing what they did since they should know better. Also check your air pressure regularly but check it cold at home and adjust as needed. Also rotate your tires since your car will pull more from the front and turning will also wear the front tires more than the rear.
 

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Does awd get less mileage out of tires. I heard that for awd vehicles the average miles you will get out of set of tires is 30,000. Also I heard the max you would ever get is 40,000.
I just don’t know if that is true. Thanks.
 

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What I actually heard and I am not a tire guy is, that since I have a Subaru Forester which has symmetrical awd. The max out of a set of tire would be 40,000 and the average would be 30,000. What does symmetrical awd have to do with how much you get out of a set of tires. I don’t know. Just what I heard. Thanks
 

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You are dead right on the difference between all-season and all-weather. If it were my car and the difference were only $76 I would opt for the WeatherReady all day long. Right now the price difference for my MDX is $85 a tire from another decent choice and that's a bit more difficult to swallow.
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I’m very curious about this because I’m currently looking at the General RT43 from a local tire shop per their recommendation vs Weather Ready from Goodyear for my 2015 Corolla. The Goodyear would be ordered direct from Goodyear so the local shop wouldn’t get the sale. I currently have the OEM Goodyear Eagle for 3 seasons and dedicated snow tires in winter. I live in Ohio too (closer to Youngstown area). I never had snow tires until I bought the Corolla, but it seems to slip and slide more than I care for on the country roads I commute on. Hence the snow tires...

the appeal of the weather ready is to eliminate the need to switch back and forth, but I wonder if I would miss the addl traction of an actual snow tire. The weather ready set of 4 (on sale now) would be $108 more than Rt43. any thoughts?
 

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What I actually heard and I am not a tire guy is, that since I have a Subaru Forester which has symmetrical awd. The max out of a set of tire would be 40,000 and the average would be 30,000. What does symmetrical awd have to do with how much you get out of a set of tires. I don’t know. Just what I heard. Thanks
Awd in general means that both axles move the vehicle forward and backwards. The symmetrical part of the awd system sends power to the wheel that looses traction.

Never owned an AWD, but mileage will be less than a fwd or a rwd setup. I'd check with the Subaru forums for this answer.
 

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PQC, I wouldn't be scared to go to the WeatherReady all year, but I am a confident snow/ice driver. The OEM Eagle tires are definitely not even "good" all season tires and I'm not shocked you didn't like them in the snow. I'm sure the snow tires make all the difference in the world.

Many years ago my girlfriend at the time had a Ford Escort GT that came from the factory with GY Eagle GT tires and she complained that the car was horrible in the snow. I discounted he complaint because that was the early days of FWD and that was a game changer for winter driving at that time, but once I drove the car I couldn't believe how bad it was. Even an inch of snow was like trying to drive on a skating rink, at 6-8" at a time was common. I immediately took her to the tire store and had a set of decent all season tires put on and she couldn't believe the difference. Never did put dedicated snow tires on the car.
 

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What I actually heard and I am not a tire guy is, that since I have a Subaru Forester which has symmetrical awd. The max out of a set of tire would be 40,000 and the average would be 30,000. What does symmetrical awd have to do with how much you get out of a set of tires. I don’t know. Just what I heard. Thanks
Naw that's crap. Plenty of people with AWD get similar tire wear as FWD. All of the tire wear factors I listed above apply the same to AWD cars. Driving style, mile type, alignment, rotation, etc. My MDX AWD has 20K miles on it's current set of tires (nothing special house brand all season) and they still measure over 7/32 tread when they started a 9/32. They'll make 50-60K easy.
 

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To extend the life of tires is to rotate every other oil change interval. But in the case of the Forester, it's awd. Rotation will not be needed since all the tires would wear the same until the computer senses loss of traction in either axle.

The Corolla can get an extended life through rotations.
I strongly disagree. The front tires will always wear faster, especially the outer edge simply due to all the turning. My shop recommends rotating them the same as any other car, otherwise you end up with front tires at 3/32 and in need of replacement while the rears are still at 6/32+ which is not good for the AWD system.
 

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Was always under the impression that rotating tires on awd isn't needed since they wear out at the same rate. I never owned one, so thanks for clearing this up.
 

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Was always under the impression that rotating tires on awd isn't needed since they wear out at the same rate. I never owned one, so thanks for clearing this up.
My cars all get rotated every 5K FWD or AWD and I get far better tire life than most, but the fact that my wife drives really easy and I drive lots of highway sure helps along with regular rotation.
 

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PQC, I wouldn't be scared to go to the WeatherReady all year, but I am a confident snow/ice driver. The OEM Eagle tires are definitely not even "good" all season tires and I'm not shocked you didn't like them in the snow. I'm sure the snow tires make all the difference in the world.

Many years ago my girlfriend at the time had a Ford Escort GT that came from the factory with GY Eagle GT tires and she complained that the car was horrible in the snow. I discounted he complaint because that was the early days of FWD and that was a game changer for winter driving at that time, but once I drove the car I couldn't believe how bad it was. Even an inch of snow was like trying to drive on a skating rink, at 6-8" at a time was common. I immediately took her to the tire store and had a set of decent all season tires put on and she couldn't believe the difference. Never did put dedicated snow tires on the car.
Just think what it would have like with a winter tire! A/S tires are meant for light snow amounts at best. Even the best A/S tire can't compete with a winter tire in the snow. I've not been that concerned with traction as much as the braking and steering benefits that winter tire provide.
 

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So awd and fwd should get basically the same mileage out of a set of tires.
Assuming everything else is the same, yes. AWD cars, unlike true 4WD trucks, have far more sophisticated drive systems that don't "scrub" tires with a limited slip system. The biggest issue with AWD cars is keeping all 4 tires the exact same size and within 2/32 of tread of each other. It is always best practice to replace tires in pair at a minimum so both tires on the same axle are the same tread depth, but AWD adds the best practice of the 2/32 rule and even that isn't really Ideal. As an example, let's say you have a matched set on the car and they are all 6/32 tread when you puncture one in a way that is not repairable and the new tires are 10/32 tread. On a FWD you would have the option of replacing just two tires and placing the new tires on either the front or the rear of the car, but with an AWD car you need to replace all 4 tires or find two used tires that are between 4/32 and 8/32 of tread to stay within the 2/32 differential. On the FWD car if the correct size was 225/65-17 you could even substitute two 235/70-17 as long as the different size went on the same axle. With AWD you absolutely must put 225/65-17 on all four wheels.
 

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Was always under the impression that rotating tires on awd isn't needed since they wear out at the same rate. I never owned one, so thanks for clearing this up.
Front tires will still wear out fast since they do more of the pulling, braking and turning than the rear tires do on an AWD. This is another example of doing it that will not hurt but can only help. Always rotate your tires every 5k miles for maximum tire life.
 

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So awd and fwd should get basically the same mileage out of a set of tires.
For the most part. If driven on the same roads the FWD may get a little more tire life since the rear tires are just rolling along vs the AWD does get power to the wheels. Most AWD systems are biased toward FWD most of the time so tire life should be within 10-15% of a FWD model.
 
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