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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, new to the forums here.

If things go smoothly, I should be getting a 1989 Xtra cab 4x4 5 speed this evening or tomorrow for the nice price of free. My father in law decided that every man needs a truck and since I don't have one he was going to sign his Toyota over to me. I've only seen the truck once, but from what I remember the body is straight with no surface rust. It's on a 3 inch body lift, and while I do not know if it's on oversized tires, I wasn't able to see or ask what specific size. I am thinking 31's though. It had a very clean interior, and comes with a tool box.

Now on to the negatives haha. From what I was told, the only problems it has are: dim head lights, broken tailgate latch, broken fuel guage, and he said under heavy load sometimes it will shift a litte rough.

The head lights and tailgate are easy fixes, but I have no idea what could be wrong with the fuel guage or how to fix it. Same with the rough shifting. I assume since it's pretty old, the transmission is probably getting a little worn, but I will be able to test drive it pretty soon.
Any suggestions etc would be much appreciated.

I'll post up pics once I have it for those interested.
 

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HiluxSupraISF
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I say take it.

Why? Because these trucks are relatively easy to fix, parts aren't super hard to find, they run great. As you stated, there isn't much to fix. for the gauge, you can find a gauge cluster. shifting, manual correct?


Good luck! I would love a 4wd Toyota
 

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1989 Toyota Pickup
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oh without a doubt I will be taking the truck. I am going to try to pick it up later today so hopefully I will be able to get some test driving in and some pictures to post up here
 

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The broken fuel gauge is more likely do to a bad sending unit rather than the actual gauge in the cluster.

Sometimes you can bring them back to life with some electrical contact cleaner.

And watch out for frame rust (depending on where you are located).
 

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The broken fuel gauge is more likely do to a bad sending unit rather than the actual gauge in the cluster.

Sometimes you can bring them back to life with some electrical contact cleaner.

And watch out for frame rust (depending on where you are located).
He's located in Arkansas. That's lower than Kansas, and whenever i get near Texas or Mississippi, things are humid
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
He's located in Arkansas. That's lower than Kansas, and whenever i get near Texas or Mississippi, things are humid
Yeah, it gets very humid here, I can't speak for Mississippi but I think Texas is a little drier than around here. I haven't been able to really give it a good look, but I haven't seen any rust. The body is pretty straight with a few dings here and there but nothing major.

It's got 155,000 miles on the clock. Truck runs fine when I can shift right, but it's been so long since I drove stick I am pretty rusty.

Sometimes though I have a hard time getting it into first and reverse, it just won't pop in to gear easily.

Here's a quick cell phone shot of how it sits right now.

 

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It's got 155,000 miles on the clock. Truck runs fine when I can shift right, but it's been so long since I drove stick I am pretty rusty.

Sometimes though I have a hard time getting it into first and reverse, it just won't pop in to gear easily.
The shift difficulty is almost certainly due to disintegrated shifter seat bushings - a very common failure point on these trucks, and one that is very cheap and easy to fix. See this thread:
http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=283988

In addition to replacing the bushings with Marlin's better-than-OEM ones, you need to make sure you have GL-4 gear oil in the tranny. See this thread:
http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=279533

You haven't told us what motor you have, but this thread may have some useful info:
http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=283353

Nice truck you have there! Have fun getting it into shape, and welcome to the forum. :welcome:
 

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HiluxSupraISF
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The shift difficulty is almost certainly due to disintegrated shifter seat bushings - a very common failure point on these trucks, and one that is very cheap and easy to fix. See this thread:
http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=283988

In addition to replacing the bushings with Marlin's better-than-OEM ones, you need to make sure you have GL-4 gear oil in the tranny. See this thread:
http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=279533

You haven't told us what motor you have, but this thread may have some useful info:
http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=283353

Nice truck you have there! Have fun getting it into shape, and welcome to the forum. :welcome:
Did those grilles (89-91) come with V6 badges? lol I'm just going from the picture.




And great to know the truck has little to none rust! I've clocked past 156 not too long ago! As for driving the manual, I've driven my first one, first gear was hard to find for me and my friend. I would believe it would be the shifter seat (like what SB5 said)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey guys, just stepped out side (I'm at work) and popped the hood to find it has the 22R-E.
 

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HiluxSupraISF
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Oh lucky. Well hopefully you have some mechanical skills, which I'm assured that you do. You will need a 12mm ratchet (or just get the whole damn metric set) and remove your valve cover. I would like for you to see if the timing chain guides are intact and in good shape.

Should be very straight forward to check!


Or ask your Father in law if the timing chain setup has been replaced and what not
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Oh lucky. Well hopefully you have some mechanical skills, which I'm assured that you do. You will need a 12mm ratchet (or just get the whole damn metric set) and remove your valve cover. I would like for you to see if the timing chain guides are intact and in good shape.

Should be very straight forward to check!


Or ask your Father in law if the timing chain setup has been replaced and what not
Thanks, once I get another day off I am probably going to take a look at this as well as a few other things. The muffler looks a little beat up and I am thinking I need to replace the whole thing.

I looked over at www.martincrawler.com for the shifter bushings but I didn't see anything that said bushing. Am I supposed to be looking for the heavy duty shifter seats or shifter socket?

I also checked the coolant and it's getting a bit low so I am going to get some more coolant this evening when I get off work. It looks like its the green stuff so I assume I need to put green stuff back in it.
 

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Thanks, once I get another day off I am probably going to take a look at this as well as a few other things. The muffler looks a little beat up and I am thinking I need to replace the whole thing.
I replaced the stock muffler with a Borla cat-back system in 96, and saw a dramatic improvement in mileage and power. My highway miles went from 20-21 to 24-25 - a 20 percent increase. The power increased very noticeably, too.

Borla doesn't make a custom-fit cat-back system for our trucks anymore, but the muffler (which was by far the best component) is still sold by itself. I highly recommend it. It's made of a very high grade of stainless, and mine is 13 years old and doesn't have a spec of rust. The Borla tone is a very nice, low, resonant sound, but not loud or tinny. It is not the loudest muffler out there, but the performance is excellent. You can have a muffler shop weld you up a system to work with the Borla, and it will probably fit better than the Borla pipes did, anyway. (They were not made of the same quality stainless as the muffler and they are rusting some - so no loss there.)

While you're replacing exhaust components, you may as well replace the cat. You have the dubious honor of having a vehicle with the #1 most often ripped-off catalytic converter. That's because it has more platinum, palladium and rhodium than any other cat, and because it's so easily accessible in your high-clearance truck. Search and you'll find lots of horror stories. The other problem is that many of us are running around with 20 year old half-clogged cats that are robbing us of power and mileage.

Many people recommend the Magnaflow - it flows better than the stock one, and much better than a half-clogged stock one. You can find them on ebay for $95 shipped.

You need to be careful in choosing the pipe diameter of your exhaust components. Exhaust systems need to be small enough to maintain a good velocity flow, without being so small that they restrict flow. High velocity flow is necessary to make sure there is a "scavenging" effect - essentially the momentum of the outgoing exhaust pulse creates low pressure behind it that sucks the remaining exhaust gasses out of the cylinder.

Borla designed my V6 system at 2.25" and as mentioned, it added a significant amount of power over the stock system. In your 4 cyl, the optimal size is 2". The Magnaflow cat designed as a direct replacement for your stock cat is 2", so that's good:
17 5/8" cat: http://www.car-sound.com/02product/displaydirectfit01.asp?catalogid=36745&directfit=23884
12 1/2" cat: http://www.car-sound.com/02product/displaydirectfit01.asp?catalogid=36753&directfit=23886
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=280307292714

The Borla "Turbo" muffler (the model that has worked so well for me) comes in two shapes in the 2" size - a wider, slightly shorter shape, and a longer, narrower shape. I've got the shorter wider one; for the 22re, I don't know which shape would be better. I recommend calling them to ask. The shorter wider one is part #40651, and the narrower one is #40657. Both are offset inlet, center outlet, which is the same as mine:
http://www.borla.com/products/universal.aspx

Here's the 2" Borla Turbo Muffler in the same configuration as the one that works so well on my veezy:
http://store.summitracing.com/partd...300286+4294904121+4294788444+115&autoview=sku

I looked over at www.martincrawler.com for the shifter bushings but I didn't see anything that said bushing. Am I supposed to be looking for the heavy duty shifter seats or shifter socket?
Follow the first link in my first post - it has the information you seek.

I also checked the coolant and it's getting a bit low so I am going to get some more coolant this evening when I get off work. It looks like its the green stuff so I assume I need to put green stuff back in it.
You're going to get a bunch of opinions on this. Here's mine: Avoid the green stuff. As a short term measure, go ahead an top it off with green stuff (NEVER MIX DIFFERENT COOLANT TYPES). For the long term, I recommend switching back to the original Toyota coolant.

I switched to the green stuff shortly after buying my truck in 95, not knowing any better, and one day I opened my radiator cap to discover to my horror that instead of green, it was pure rust - the color of coffee with creme. Now, I made two mistakes that contributed to that disaster- I did not know the importance of flushing every single drop of old coolant out (if you are changing coolant types - because they chemically react), and I didn't know not to use tap water (because the minerals react with the corrosion inhibitors, depleting the inhibitors and forming scale deposits).

As a result of these two mistakes, I unknowingly destroyed much of the corrosion inhibitors of the new coolant, and therefore shortened it's useful life. It's true that these mistakes would have gotten me into trouble with any coolant type, but the green stuff is much less forgiving where iron corrosion protection is concerned.

Our trucks offer a challenge to any coolant: the blocks are iron, the heads aluminum, and the radiator & heater core are brass, copper and lead. Prestone green uses non-organic silicates for corrosion inhibition. They are primarily designed to protect aluminum, and are less effective guarding against iron oxidation. The green stuff works fine with the metals in the radiator & heater core.

I discovered how lousy the green stuff is at combating rust because after flushing the rusty coolant out with SIX thorough flushes and refilling with fresh green stuff, I found my coolant had again turned to rust in just a few weeks.

The coolant Toyota designed for the truck, Toyota Red Long Life coolant, uses non-organic phosphates for corrosion inhibition, which are much better at protecting iron than the green stuff. It does fine with aluminum and with the brass-copper-lead radiator & heater core. Someone told me I would have better luck with the Toyota coolant, and I switched back, this time making sure to thoroughly flush the green stuff out and mixing only distilled water with the coolant (I had learned my lesson). There wasn't any sign of rust even after a year, and at two years when I changed it, there was only a very little bit of rust - much less than the green stuff had after only a month.

There are new types of coolant on the market which use corrosion inhibitors based on organic acids. These do not break down as quickly as the inorganic silicates or phosphates in the Prestone green or Toyota red coolants. However, you should not use them in your truck because they are designed for aluminum radiators: they will corrode the old style brass-copper-lead radiators and heater cores. This includes DexCool, as well as a host of new "extended life" and "universal" coolants. Your safest bet is to stick with the coolant Toyota designed for the vehicle.

If you want to switch back to Toyota red, be sure to thoroughly flush all the green stuff out, including out of the heater core. Make your last flush distilled water, since no matter what you do, some of the fluid will remain behind in the heater core and various pockets in the block. Fill with 40 or 50 percent Toyota Red (not the new premixed Toyota Pink - that's an organic acid coolant) and mix with distilled water only.

Water transfers heat better than coolant, so using 40 percent will protect the engine better on a hot day. Using 50 percent coolant will give better corrosion protection, as well as lower temperature freeze protection. Either percentage would probably work fine in Arkansas.

Whatever coolant you use, be sure to change it at least every two years. Don't believe anyone or anything that tells you coolant can last longer, or one day you'll have a rusty surprise.
 

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^ I love this guy

(No ****)


I've been on green stuff for a while. When i did my timing chain, my coolant at that time.. was like untouched, but up to the point it was bad. it was rusty, and brown... Not good. Partially it was green, so i had to stick with green for a while. I'll be heading back to Red sometime soon. about 5K miles later, it is still green. That's not mixing. and with a pretty thorough flush.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wow sb5, thanks for all the advice! This will come in handy.

I took my truck over to my step father and let him try it out, and we both came to an agreement it needs a tune up and the shifter seats would help out a lot. He also thought the clutch needed to be readjusted.

We also discovered a hole in the exhaust, which is probably causing some issues with losing power especially on the interstate.

So as of right now I have the following tentative list of things to do:

Spark Plugs
Wires
Air Filter
Check timing chain
New belts
Sea Foam
Oil change
Shifter seat/bushing
Adjust clutch
Flush transmission fluid
Flush antifreeze
Get new exhaust system
New headlights

(optional)
Big 3 electrical upgrade
Install amps and subwoofer

Wow I need to get to work!
 

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For the plugs, do yourself a favor and get the specified Denso W16EXR-U - nothing works better in these motors than the recommended Densos. In fact, for electrical items, Densos are almost always the best choice - they are designed to work together and they do outperform other brands.

For spark plug wires, I always use Toyota factory ones, which are manufactured for Toyota by Denso. The Denso wires use inductive radio noise suppression: the wires are actually an extremely tight coil. Most other wires on the market use resistance to achieve radio suppression - which degrades the spark voltage. The factory wire set is far better than aftermarket - they are numbered, perfectly sized, include all the keepers. Cheapest source is 1sttoyotaparts.com

If the timing chain is original, it should be replaced asap. Normally they should be replaced by 120k because if the chain breaks, the motor will destroy itself. Many 22re owners recommend engnbldr.com - they sell a kit with stronger steel-backed guides. Others recommend OEM Toyota timing parts - even though they have all plastic guides, the other parts are top quality. 1sttoyotaparts.com is one of the cheapest sources of Toyota factory parts. autohausaz.com sells a "Japan" kit with plastic guides that is probably comparable to the toyota parts - some, possibly all of the parts in that kit may be from the manufacturers of the toyota factory parts.

If the O2 sensor has over 90k miles, add that to the list. Get a Denso if you can afford; an NGK (NTK) if $$ is tight. sparkplugs.com has good prices. Do the seafoam treatment before you install the new sensor - the carbon and gunk flushed by seafoam can nuke the sensor (and can gunk up the cat also).

For seafoaming, pour 1/3 can into the brake booster end of the brake booster vacuum hose and immediately have a helper kill the motor. Let sit 10-15 mins, then reattach hose and start it, running it until the smoke clears, then pour another 1/3 can into the booster hose and repeat the cycle. Pour the last third into the gas tank. Using seafoam in the oil is not recommended on a high mile motor unless you are having problems due to gunk in the crankcase - reason is, that gunk can be providing a seal, and flushing it can cause oil leaks.

Dirty throttle bodies cause all kinds of idle problems, so after seafoaming, clean the throttle body with a cleaner designed for throttle bodies, NOT carbs. 3M, Wurth, CRC and STP all make throttle body specific cleaners. Be sure to give several good shots into the upper and lower holes just in front of the throttle plate - those are your air bypasses - the upper is the hot idle and the lower the cold idle air bypass (called by toyota the "auxiliary air valve" and by others as the "IAC" - idle air control). Be sure to get the back of the throttle plate with a toothbrush. Be very careful not to get any cleaner on the black plastic throttle position sensor on the side of the throttle body - solvents will kill it. After cleaning, lubricate the throttle plate shaft with a drop of 3-in-one oil on both ends.

Treat any frame/chassis rust with a good rust converter - one that is based on tannic acid, and preferably one which contains butoxyethanol instead of vinyl acrylics. Probably the best product on the market is Fertan - developed for use by the British Navy, it is used extensively in commercial marine applications and for archeological preservation of iron artifacts. Here's the U.S. supplier:
http://www.fertanamerica.com/

Have fun with your new truck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the advice and links once again. Knowing what parts work the best will save me a lot of time and money. Awesome
 
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