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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently pulled my throttle body off the car to inspect, and was pretty horrified how dirty it was. The air control valve was caked too, I can't believe it was even working. What I thought was throttle cables needing lubricant turned out to be a TB so dirty the valve was sticking.

Then I came across a YouTube video that compared a cheapo catch can off Amazon with a Mishimoto unit, and they are essentially identical except for different fittings. I was convinced that it's worth doing for the $18-19 I paid.
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The one tiny error I made, was after I cut the hoses to length I got them backwards. It made for a slightly less clean install, but I left it as is because no one but me is gonna be looking under there (well I guess you now too). If I had attached them correctly the two hoses would be side by side making it look more factory.

All I needed was 4ft of fuel line, a 90 degree 3/8" PCV elbow, a straight 3/8" male to male nipple fitting, one Allen bolt and nut with a 10-13mm sleeve spacer and lock washer, and the catch can. I'll prob switch the hose clamps out to 3/8" fuel injection hose clamps to clean up the install at the same time I switch the hoses how I meant to have them. I was able to modify the bracket that came with the catch can, and I didn't have to drill a single hole into my car which I always aim for.

Please don't tell me it's stupid to add this, the less oil getting burned by the engine the better. After 5-6k miles I'll take a picture showing what it collects.

I was surprised the only examples I could find of 5sfe with catch cans were very ugly installs with hoses going all over the engine bay. Mine already looks a lot better than examples I've seen and I didn't get the hoses right haha. The cannisters can actually be unscrewed and removed as well. It takes some hand yoga, but it's doable. It's only one fastener to remove if I decide to do it that way.

If you decide to do your own, add it to this thread so future people can easily find it! Cheers
 

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1995 T100 2WD & 1993 MR2
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Several T100 owners have installed a variety of Catch Cans with impressive or scary results depending on your perspective and our 3.4 V6's aren't consider oil burners. Nice clean install, should be interesting when you check it down the road. (y)
 

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Without GDI letting the EGR blow by foul up the valves that oil vapor is just extra fuel; I believe FI teams allow their cars to gain extra hp just for qualifying by a similar mechanism. Now it may eventually decrease the cat efficiency but >20 yr old cats are in two categories anyway: dead or soon to be dead. Catch cans are largely marketed to the poor guys with carboned up, poorly designed GDI cars, along with "top tier gas" and other spurious "cures". IMHO/YMMV.
 

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500,000 + Miles
2000 Solara
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Assume a person could skip Amazon and make that from a pickle jar...or other favorite lidded condiment. Drill a couple of holes in the lid and attach hoses with appropriate sealed fittings. I might add one of these contraptions and see if there is any evidence I'm loosing some of those two quarts/5,000 miles through the PCV. I do change that PCV out fairly regularly but assume oil vapor still comes through.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Assume a person could skip Amazon and make that from a pickle jar...or other favorite lidded condiment. Drill a couple of holes in the lid and attach hoses with appropriate sealed fittings. I might add one of these contraptions and see if there is any evidence I'm loosing some of those two quarts/5,000 miles through the PCV. I do change that PCV out fairly regularly but assume oil vapor still comes through.
I'm not a big fan of giving Bezos my money but someone sent me a gift card for Xmas. I theorized once how I could make my own, until I realized it's much easier to buy one and/or modify one.
 

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2000 Solara
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Do the commercial cans have some kind of surface area-increasing material inside the can to help trap the oil?
 

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2013 Subaru BRZ
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Assume a person could skip Amazon and make that from a pickle jar...or other favorite lidded condiment. Drill a couple of holes in the lid and attach hoses with appropriate sealed fittings. I might add one of these contraptions and see if there is any evidence I'm loosing some of those two quarts/5,000 miles through the PCV. I do change that PCV out fairly regularly but assume oil vapor still comes through.
I am quite interested in getting a well made unit and install it cleanly. Better have a nice color to brighten ethe engine bay. I am actually interested. Please let me know if there's a ready made good solution out there.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mine has a 50 micron droplet condenser, a baffle for each port, and a larger disk inside with holes in it. The droplet condenser unscrews and you could put stainless mesh behind it if you wanted, but I figured I should see how it works first before adding anything to it.
 

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Thanks for posting this. I will follow this thread and be curious about whether there is any reduction of carbon in the IAC valve. I contemplated adding a catch can to my 2001 5sfe but decided not to because the PCV enters the intake system downstream of the throttle body--I couldn't figure out how the IAC would be impacted.
Good luck!
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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I wonder if a catch can would really be necessary if the PCV is replaced at a regular interval?

Other than severe engine wear, I can't think of any other reason why the amount of oil in the intake would increase on an old engine, when it was fine for the first 100k miles or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
For all I know my intake valves are perfectly clean from fuel hitting them. But I'm certain my actual intake is caked with oil, as I just recently looked in there and wiped as far as I could. I don't know if a catch can helps with the actual TB or IACV but it definitely won't hurt. My engine runs great and has no damage. The vacuum connection for the brake booster is after the PCV, so I imagine there's a fair bit of oil residue in that line as well.

The fresh air inlet on the VC becomes an outlet under low or no vacuum situations, so if vapors are sucked in at that point (however short it may be) there would surely be some vapors going in there hitting TB/IACV.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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Still, it ran great for many, many years, and as many miles, so it isn't like there is a great, underlying fault to solve.

My 25 year old 3VZ-FE V6 engine, with 200k miles, had black residue on the inside surface of its intake manifold, but it was only cosmetic. I made sure the EGR was working (replaced the EGR valve just in case) and put on a new PCV until the next 100k miles has passed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I certainly am not claiming I'm fixing anything, but like I said earlier anything that keeps less oil in the intake isn't a bad thing. If it was costly or very time involved I probably wouldn't bother, but it's neither of those things.
 

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The EGR fouls up everything way more than blow-by oil but is harmless. My intake plenum looks disgusting but I've never cleaned it and never had an issue.

Also, the PCV hose slopes down from the intake plenum to the valve cover. Oil in the blow-by flows back down to the PCV valve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I understand some people aren't interested in this project, that's fine. Opinions are like...well you know. I'm done "defending" why I did this.
You don't like it, fine, move on please ☺
 

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PCV enters the intake system downstream of the throttle body--I couldn't figure out how the IAC would be impacted.
Good luck!
Correct - the gunk in the IAC is because (1) the breather hose that runs from the valve cover to the fat air intake hose has some blow-by oil (2) the EGR is just behind the throttle plate and brings exhaust fumes and carbon. It has nothing to do with the PCV valve except if the PCV was clogged, blow-by oil would be forced in to the intake from the breather hose.
 

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That little PCV hose is just minding its own business and you just KICK it out of the bay.
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Only a monster could say no to such a cute little PCV hose like that. You MONSTER.
 

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Getting that oil-mist out of my intake manifold is on my to-do list for sure. In the old days cars just had "breathers" on the valve covers that separated the oil from the air and blew the blow-by into the atmosphere. I can see saving the oil in a can that is vented to the atmosphere and periodically emptying it back into the engine oil-fill. My old motorcycle has a dry-sump oiling system so I can vent the crankcase breather to a separator on top of it's oil tank to conserve oil automatically but still get rid of combustion blow-by. Dyno-tests using reed-valves on the crankcase that generate a vacuum in the crankcase show significant horsepower gains. There are companies that make and sell reed-valve breathers which could be adapted to the Toyota engine , which would be the ultimate setup with the blow-by going through the reed-valve, into a catch-can to separate the oil for re-use, then to the atmosphere.
 
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