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Diehard Rams Fan
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Discussion Starter #1
Last week there were some people asking how hard It was to do an oil change on the iM. I figure that I'd share it with other Corolla groups since it's the same process. I don't think many 2ZR Corollas have the plastic undercover tray but the rest is the same. I had to do mine so I made a video for the novice that has never changed the oil on a car before, hope this helps!

 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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Discussion Starter #4
Will need to look into the washers you mentioned in your video. The replacement dormans I purchased from RA uses a plastic washer. It doesn't leak, but the metal ones are better.
I've always used the OEM washer and I've never had one leak in 40+ years of doing my own oil changes. I know that the OEM washer for manual transmission drain and fill bolts are metal though.
 
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Diehard Rams Fan
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Discussion Starter #6
Does Toyota sell washers for the trans drain bolt also? Or is it the same washer?
I know that the manual trans washers are different. I don't have a CVT or AT to know if those are different. I would guess that those use a metal washer as the MT does.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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Discussion Starter #8
I have a metal washer on my drain bolt for the transmission. Just wondering since I have not replaced the washer since buying my Corolla xrs in 2016.
I always replace them with new ones too, but I've heard of people reusing them with no issues.
 
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Diehard Rams Fan
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Discussion Starter #9
Does Toyota sell washers for the trans drain bolt also? Or is it the same washer?
I just realized that I didn't answer the question. Yes, they do, at least for the MT so I'm sure they do for an AT or CVT too.
 

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I always replace them with new ones too, but I've heard of people reusing them with no issues.
I've always reused the washer on the drain plugs. in 30+ years i have never had a leak. the only leak i had was from someone else prior to me purchasing the vehicle who messed the washer up.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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Discussion Starter #11
I've always reused the washer on the drain plugs. in 30+ years i have never had a leak. the only leak i had was from someone else prior to me purchasing the vehicle who messed the washer up.
The new ones are so cheap so why not? The material is like a paper/cardboard feel so replacing it is a no brainer. It's a perfect case of not being penny wise and pound foolish. ;)
 

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The new ones are so cheap so why not? The material is like a paper/cardboard feel so replacing it is a no brainer. It's a perfect case of not being penny wise and pound foolish. ;)
I hear u. Just havent needed too. The one that was a leak i noticed when i bought the car and replaced it when i changed the oil. This is my experience on about 35 to 40 cars so idk...its worked for me. The number of cars were including family and friends cars. We have 6 cars that get driven daily at my place and any of my cars i go well over 200k miles on them before selling them usually and none of them have leaks of any kind
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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Discussion Starter #15
They don't offer auto shop classes in high school anymore?
I think that most of those programs have ended. Most young drivers have no idea how to do the basics unless they learned it from their dad.
 

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It depends on the areas. My son's high school doesn't offer auto shop or welding. They are more aligned with STEM. Computer coding, networking, IT.
That's really interesting. I wasn't aware of that. We grew up with metal, auto, plastic, and wood shop elective offerings in HS. These were categorized as life long learning skills. I guess times have changed. That puts things into perspective.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
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Discussion Starter #17
That's really interesting. I wasn't aware of that. We grew up with metal, auto, plastic, and wood shop elective offerings in HS. These were categorized as life long learning skills. I guess times have changed. That puts things into perspective.
It really is sad that these programs have disappeared.
 

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2006 Corolla XRS
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Yes it is sad. This is where programs like UTI come in. Pricey as heck, but fills the stop gap between high school and community college.

When I lived in the same Francisco Bay area, the schools also provided help towards obtaining ASE certs.
 

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straight cash homie
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Yes it is sad. This is where programs like UTI come in. Pricey as heck, but fills the stop gap between high school and community college.
Better to go to CC for auto program than UTI. T-TEN is still at a lot of community colleges around the country.
 

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2006 Corolla XRS
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Yes I agree. Though, I haven't seen an auto program in any of the CC's here in Arizona. It's mostly manufacturing programs like CNC.

The older generations are getting ready to retire and automation fills that gap with respect to manufacturing.

With automotive, people in general no longer stay loyal to the companies in which they started with. Most have gone off to start their own shops. But given the high over head, it's tough to sustain your shop.

Mechanics are always relevant part of society. They don't have robots to change oil or rebuild an engine or transmission.
 
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