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Hi Everyone,

I just went to have my oil changed at valvoline instant oil change and they wouldn't let me use 5W-20 as the specs called for 0W-20 synthetic. This was quite a big price difference and if I'm required to use it, I will do my own oil changes.

Regardless if I use 5w-20 or 0w-20, I will change the oil every 5k. The owner's manual says to use 0w-20, but you can use 5w-20 in a pinch and next oil change use 0w-20. On the other hand, the maintenance log notes at every 5k interval to change the oil if 0w-20 wasn't used.

What do you all do? If I do oil changes at every 5k, is it OK to use 5w-20 all of the time?

Thank you in advance!
 

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You can use any grade you want. But, just make sure its synthetic.

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Hi Everyone,

I just went to have my oil changed at valvoline instant oil change and they wouldn't let me use 5W-20 as the specs called for 0W-20 synthetic. This was quite a big price difference and if I'm required to use it, I will do my own oil changes.

Regardless if I use 5w-20 or 0w-20, I will change the oil every 5k. The owner's manual says to use 0w-20, but you can use 5w-20 in a pinch and next oil change use 0w-20. On the other hand, the maintenance log notes at every 5k interval to change the oil if 0w-20 wasn't used.

What do you all do? If I do oil changes at every 5k, is it OK to use 5w-20 all of the time?

Thank you in advance!
Toyota "wants to" specify that synthetic oil be used in all their newer engines. However, they are afraid to the use the "S" word because that conjures up ideas that a Toyota has a higher cost of ownership than some other brands, which creates a competitive disadvantage when people buy new cars. So what they did is to specify 0W-20, which is only available as a synthetic (no conventional oil can achieve a 0W performance level). Since Toyota started doing that, some motor oil companies have released a 0W-20 synthetic blend, but lets ignore that for now.

As to what to use, you may have consider what is required to maintain your warranty. If that is not a concern to you, then so long as you use a synthetic you will fine with either 0W-20 or 5W-20. As far as oil change interval, so long as you change it at least every 10,000 miles, your warranty is intact, but no problem if you want to change it more frequently.

Given the low cost of synthetics like SuperTech at Walmart, and other similar brands, there is no excuse to not use a synthetic motor on a new car. There may some synthetics which are a little better than SuperTech, but SuperTech synthetic is far, far superior than any conventional motor oil.
 

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Mark888's advice is on point. If your winter temperature is not cold, you can use 5w20 synthetic for 10000 miles, or 5w20 conventional for 5000. Due to the higher tolerance of modern engine, maybe Toyota do have a point at specing a 0w oil for cold winter temps.
 

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I've been considering using Rotella T6 5w-40 (full synthetic) during the summer months when towing my 1,200 lbs motorcycle trailer, and it's the same oil I use in my motorcycles and other small gas engines.
 

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Increasing oil weight to 40 is a no no. Thicker oil at operating temperature will not flow as well as thinner oil in modern engine. You will void the warranty. Don't be liberal with your oil choice. Use the correct weight. 40 weight is at operating temperature, not air temperature, so summer months or not doesn't matter.
 

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I've been considering using Rotella T6 5w-40 (full synthetic) during the summer months when towing my 1,200 lbs motorcycle trailer, and it's the same oil I use in my motorcycles and other small gas engines.
If you wanna use rotella id go with the gas truck 0/20 or 5/20. I haven't seen any bad reviews of the Rotella gas truck oil, everything ive read has been positive.

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
 

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I've been considering using Rotella T6 5w-40 (full synthetic) during the summer months when towing my 1,200 lbs motorcycle trailer, and it's the same oil I use in my motorcycles and other small gas engines.
You didn't say which engine you are considering that for, but if it is for a Toyota gas engine that specifies 0W-20, then 5W-40 is too high of a viscosity. If for some reason you needed a higher than recommended viscosity (serious oil leaks or burning), the highest I would go is 5W-30.
 

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JamesBMac
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One comment I haven't seen thus far...The point of 0W-20 is twofold...1. To help Toyota fleet overall gas mileage goals. Lower viscosity results (minimally) in better gas mileage. 2. Emissions are aided, particularly upon startup, with a lower viscosity oil. Both of these reasons mean practically nothing to an individual car owner but the sum of these small benefits to a lower viscosity oil add up to a lot for the Toyota fleet.
In my humble opinion you could easily use a 5W-20 in any car spec'd with 0W-20 (synthetic of course) if you found a significant price difference and it would make no difference in performance or warranty.
 

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Hi Everyone,

I just went to have my oil changed at valvoline instant oil change and they wouldn't let me use 5W-20 as the specs called for 0W-20 synthetic. This was quite a big price difference and if I'm required to use it, I will do my own oil changes.

Regardless if I use 5w-20 or 0w-20, I will change the oil every 5k. The owner's manual says to use 0w-20, but you can use 5w-20 in a pinch and next oil change use 0w-20. On the other hand, the maintenance log notes at every 5k interval to change the oil if 0w-20 wasn't used.

What do you all do? If I do oil changes at every 5k, is it OK to use 5w-20 all of the time?

Thank you in advance!
In Australia.Toyotas recommended oil 5W30
 

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I've been considering using Rotella T6 5w-40 (full synthetic) during the summer months when towing my 1,200 lbs motorcycle trailer, and it's the same oil I use in my motorcycles and other small gas engines.
6 Major Differences Between Motor and Diesel Oils | Raleigh Public Record

Diesel engines don’t use the same catalytic converter type, which means that diesel oil has higher amounts of zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) compared to gasoline engine oil. ZDDP has both phosphorous and zinc, and this is the reason why diesel oil shouldn’t be used in gas engines.
 

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I run 10w40

The recommended grades are strictly for CAFE.

Definitely consider the 5w40 if weather permits it.

Zddp protects engines. Who cares if the catalytic lasts 150k miles or 200k miles. They are cheap enough to replace. Sucks when an engine wears out. Choose what you want to wear out.
 

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.....
What do you all do? If I do oil changes at every 5k, is it OK to use 5w-20 all of the time?
You can use either as posts above have responded. Just to add one minor point, how often you change the oil doesn't have much relevance to the weight of the oil you use, besides, changing 5W-20 every 1000 or 10k miles, you are still using 5W-20. ?
Good to know you have decided to stick with the OEM recommended 0W-20, with Full Synthetic now. ?
 

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The recommended grades are strictly for CAFE.

Definitely consider the 5w40 if weather permits it.
Correct. Oil recommendation on my wife's 07 Lexus ES-350 is 5W-30 even though it's the same engine.

I like the 0W-X oil especially during the winter because we do a lot of ski trips to the white mountains. And it's not unheard of to wake up Sunday mornings (when we head back) to temps of -20 or even -30. 0W-X really helps. Most engine damage is done during a cold startup. At -30 10W oil is like a molasses. 5W isn't much better.

For over a year now I've been running 0W-30 in both vehicles.

5W-40 - when the engine is at normal operating temps the oil is THINNER then when the engine is cold. Oil thins when it gets hot. The higher second number means it won't be as thin as a lower number....0W-30 is thicker when hot then 0W-20 when hot. Both have the same viscosity (0) when cold. The W stands for Winter. Not weight.
 

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W is part of the prefix grade.... 0w 5w.... It meets a cranking and pumping requirements with a minimum viscosity at hot temp.
The suffix is a combinstion of HTHS and measured viscosity range for each grade....16 20 30 40

An oil can be labelled with a suffix, prefix, or both. To avoid confusion, an oil that can meet multiple suffixes can only use one and preferably the lowest suffix grade....similar with prefix but highest grade as some prefixes overlap.

Mobil 0w20 MRV is 9200 @ -40
Mobil 0w40 MRV is 21600 @ -40

As you can see, both above meet the 0w requirement but one is more than twice as thick as the other. The 0w requirement is considerably higher.

SAE covers oil grade bottle labeling. Most dont have a clue what a bottle grade really is.

5w meets pumping requirements at -35 and cranking requirements @ -30. None of my oils were molasses at those temps. I am glad that I dont experience those temps regularly. Thick but capable of moving for pumping and cranking.
 

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W is part of the prefix grade.... 0w 5w.... It meets a cranking and pumping requirements with a minimum viscosity at hot temp.
W stands for cold weather viscosity.


 

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Correct. Oil recommendation on my wife's 07 Lexus ES-350 is 5W-30 even though it's the same engine.

I like the 0W-X oil especially during the winter because we do a lot of ski trips to the white mountains. And it's not unheard of to wake up Sunday mornings (when we head back) to temps of -20 or even -30. 0W-X really helps. Most engine damage is done during a cold startup. At -30 10W oil is like a molasses. 5W isn't much better.

For over a year now I've been running 0W-30 in both vehicles.

5W-40 - when the engine is at normal operating temps the oil is THINNER then when the engine is cold. Oil thins when it gets hot. The higher second number means it won't be as thin as a lower number....0W-30 is thicker when hot then 0W-20 when hot. Both have the same viscosity (0) when cold. The W stands for Winter. Not weight.
I can't agree with that. HL has a different engine from that 07 EX-350. The injection system is different, and the piston and cylinder may also be different.
Also, 40 weight oil will be thicker than 30 weight oil at operating temperature. The additives actually increase the thickness of the oil at the designed temperature. The designated W weight is to help engine oil flow when temperature is very cold.
 

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The injection system is different, and the piston and cylinder may also be different.
Nope..They are the same.And different pistons wouldn't have an effect on what oil weight to use. Bearing clearances would have a big impact...but not pistons or piston rings.

Also, 40 weight oil will be thicker than 30 weight oil at operating temperature.
I never said any different. I said (which you may have confused) is that 5W-40....when engine is at operating temps the oil will be at it's thinnest. When engine is cold the oil will be at it's thickest. A lot of people get confused with that. Yes the additives are long chain molecules that are curled up when cold. As oil heats up they unfold and make the oil thicker. That's the confusing part. The oil is still much thinner then when cold...it's just LESS THIN due to the additives. Without the additives the 5 weight oil would be like water. An easy test to show what I'm talking about is to find 10W straight weight oil and compare it to 30W straight weight oil. Pour both from bottle and you'll clearly see the flow difference between the two. The 10W will flow much better then 30W. Now heat up the 30W oil and run that same test and you'll see the heated 30W flow much much better then the 10W. Now take 10W-30 oil. Pour this oil from the bottle and it should flow the same rate as 10W oil. Now heat it up. Again do the same test and pour the oil and you'll see the flow rate should be the same as heated 30W oil.
 
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