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Nope..They are the same.And different pistons wouldn't have an effect on what oil weight to use. Bearing clearances would have a big impact...but not pistons or piston rings.
They may have the same engine block, but the tolerance from the piston ring to cylinder could be different, and bearing and oil passage clearance will be different. Toyota recommend 5W30 for your ES and my 2006 RX, but 5w20 is also acceptable. You may lower the weight, but not for higher weight, at least not for prolonged period. Why want to go against manufacture's recommendation? Another poster above run 40 weight oil, but I think that's foolhardy.
 

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They may have the same engine block, but the tolerance from the piston ring to cylinder could be different
Have you ever rebuilt an engine? I'm going to say NO. Bearing tolerances could be different, but I seriously doubt it. Engines built 30+ years ago...yes...but modern engines are built with very well designed tolerances. An engine ever as far back as 15 years ago are not going to have any differences unless there was a design problem with that first iteration of the engine.

You're only guessing. Let me know when you have proof to you assertions.

And based on a 30 second google search - looks like there is no difference in engine bearing tolerances since they all use the same bearings.


Manufacturers have been recommending thinner oil so they can meet their Cafe' numbers. It's been going on for decades. Nothing new.
 

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IMHO. Best to follow mfg. recommendation. Avoid engine parts not getting oil, quickly enough, when using the wrong viscosity.
 

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Hi Everyone,

I just went to have my oil changed at valvoline instant oil change and they wouldn't let me use 5W-20 as the specs called for 0W-20 synthetic. This was quite a big price difference and if I'm required to use it, I will do my own oil changes.

Regardless if I use 5w-20 or 0w-20, I will change the oil every 5k. The owner's manual says to use 0w-20, but you can use 5w-20 in a pinch and next oil change use 0w-20. On the other hand, the maintenance log notes at every 5k interval to change the oil if 0w-20 wasn't used.

What do you all do? If I do oil changes at every 5k, is it OK to use 5w-20 all of the time?

Thank you in advance!
You must hate your car if you want to use 5W-20 in it. Just buy the 0W-20 full synthtic supertech which is a good of an oil as you can buy. It's onlne for 15 dollars per 5 quart jug. You can buy Mobil 1 if you want for about 24 dollars per 5 quarts at walmart also. It's NOT that expensive compared to a 6 grand engine. 5W-20 isn't going to flow as well in the winter. You could use it in the summer or if you live in a warm climate in the winter.
 

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You must hate your car if you want to use 5W-20 in it. Just buy the 0W-20 full synthtic supertech which is a good of an oil as you can buy. It's onlne for 15 dollars per 5 quart jug. You can buy Mobil 1 if you want for about 24 dollars per 5 quarts at walmart also. It's NOT that expensive compared to a 6 grand engine. 5W-20 isn't going to flow as well in the winter. You could use it in the summer or if you live in a warm climate in the winter.
One more thing to add. Your timing chain tensioner operates using motor oil pressure. If you use the thicker oil in the winter, the chain will remain slack for a little extra time putting extra wear and tear on it. Who knows how much damage that could do, but it's not worth taking a chance.
 

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I used to go to Valvoline for oil changes. However, I'm pretty certain that they lost my drain bolt, then installed a "one-use" or non-OEM drain plug, which stripped the oil pan threads. They did not note the drain plug issue at all; then on the next oil change, which was at the Toyota dealer, the dealer told me about the damage. Valvoline is supposed to tell you if there is any drain plug problems, which they didn't, and they did not stand by their work. In regards to oil, I will always follow the manual. I'll just stick to what the engineers suggest, who developed the car.
 

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In regards to oil, I will always follow the manual. I'll just stick to what the engineers suggest, who developed the car.
I think that is fine if you want to follow the advice in the Owner's Manual, especially for warranty purposes.

But I think you are very naïve if you think that the engineers are the ones who make the final decision about these things. Toyota has to balance fuel mileage regulations (such as CAFE in the USA) against engine longevity issues, and engine longevity does not always win.
 

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But I think you are very naïve if you think that the engineers are the ones who make the final decision about these things. Toyota has to balance fuel mileage regulations (such as CAFE in the USA) against engine longevity issues, and engine longevity does not always win.
Yup. Manufacturers have been doing that for decades. The final word since at least the 70's has been finance and marketing.
 

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my 08 tacoma 2.7l recommends 5W-20 for Cold weather not something we see here much in SoCal otherwise 0W-20
 

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Have you ever rebuilt an engine? I'm going to say NO. Bearing tolerances could be different, but I seriously doubt it. Engines built 30+ years ago...yes...but modern engines are built with very well designed tolerances. An engine ever as far back as 15 years ago are not going to have any differences unless there was a design problem with that first iteration of the engine.

You're only guessing. Let me know when you have proof to you assertions.

And based on a 30 second google search - looks like there is no difference in engine bearing tolerances since they all use the same bearings.


Manufacturers have been recommending thinner oil so they can meet their Cafe' numbers. It's been going on for decades. Nothing new.
How many people rebuild modern engine anymore? Anyway, we are just some random forum posters on the internet with conjectures and opinions . What makes our advice better than the manufacturer's?
 

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How many people rebuild modern engine anymore?
I'm talking about any engine ever. You're spouting off engine specs like you actually know what they mean. Having rebuilt an engine or two would give more credibility to what you're saying.

What makes our advice better than the manufacturer's?
I'm not advising people to use a different oil that what the manufacturer has said. I'm saying is there are alternatives.

Thee driving force for thinner oils is to meet Cafe' numbers....PERIOD. I'd be far more concerned about meeting the API spec then the weight (although sometimes that goes hand in hand).

Go to other parts of the world that sell vehicles with the EXACT same engines that are sold in the US and you may find different oil viscosity specs. South America is a great example. I've visited there several times over the years.


 

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With all that said, and you didn't care about a little better gas mileage, wouldn't a good synthetic 0W-40 be the best of both worlds? My Audi calls for 0W-40 as does my son's BMW.
We live in an area that can see -15 in the winter to 90-110 in the summer.
 

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With all that said, and you didn't care about a little better gas mileage, wouldn't a good synthetic 0W-40 be the best of both worlds? My Audi calls for 0W-40 as does my son's BMW.
We live in an area that can see -15 in the winter to 90-110 in the summer.
Most 0W-40 motor oils are "European Formula" oils that are not appropriate for most American or Asian vehicles. European Formula motor oils, among other differences, have reduced levels of some friction reducing additives to reduce pollution per EU regulations. Almost all German cars specify European Formula motor oils.

Using a higher viscosity than 0W-20 may have some benefits, but that only goes so far to the point when the viscosity is just too high for the engine design. Unless a non-German car with a lot of engine wear is experiencing very significant oil consumption that might benefit from 0W-40, I would not go higher than 0W-30 or 5W-30 full synthetics on an engine where the manufacturer recommends 0W-20.
 

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You can go to this link & look at the various differences in Mobile 1 synthetic oils. Especially take note of the difference in the zinc & phosphoros PPM levels in the 0W-20 as compared to the 0W-40. Interesting how they recommend certain oils for different applications.
 

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I would not go higher than 0W-30 or 5W-30 full synthetics on an engine where the manufacturer recommends 0W-20.
0W-40 is THINNER when how then 0W-20 is when cold.

While I generally agree with your statement...as long as the oil meets the api spec for the engine it should be safe enough to use. What I don't like about 0W-40 is the added modifiers to achieve the 40w. The more modifiers the less oil.
 

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I used to go to Valvoline for oil changes. However, I'm pretty certain that they lost my drain bolt, then installed a "one-use" or non-OEM drain plug, which stripped the oil pan threads. They did not note the drain plug issue at all; then on the next oil change, which was at the Toyota dealer, the dealer told me about the damage. Valvoline is supposed to tell you if there is any drain plug problems, which they didn't, and they did not stand by their work. In regards to oil, I will always follow the manual. I'll just stick to what the engineers suggest, who developed the car.
But, but I thought dealerships are bad, scrum of the earth trying annoy and rip off all their customers?
 

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I don't know what you mean by thinner. If you mean lower viscosity, I believe you are wrong.
Lower viscosity means thinner oil.

Yes...lower viscosity. And no I am not wrong.

Look at chart in the url below. The viscosity of a 40 weight oil at 150 degrees is 3.7. The viscosity of 0 weight oil at 100 degrees is 3.8. The lower the number the thinner the oil.


How about this one.


Maybe this one.

 
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