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I had a 1999 XJ8L, and that was the first year after Ford had purchased Jaguar where all the electrical engineering for the car was of Ford origin. There was not a Lucas device in the car, and the improvement showed, and to call it dramatic would be an understatement of the highest sort.

But, like all auto makers, Ford selected parts that met the specifications they wanted/needed that were offered to them at the lowest price. Anyone who believes that any, and I do mean any, automobile maker in the world these days does not source parts by putting out bids "to spec" is fooling themselves. There are lots of reasons why certain brands of parts cling to certain marques, very often because that marque actually has significant ownership interest in the part maker, but you can bet your bottom dollar/euro/yen/pound sterling/whatever that were a competitor to come along and offer a part built to the same spec at significantly lower cost, that's the part that would be used. It comes down to what costs the least, all things considered, and meets the designated specifications.

And you can ask anyone you know that is closely associated with the automobile making industry, and they'll confirm it.

It's also highly suspect to use country of manufacture as any meaningful metric these days. Virtually anyone can make excellent quality these days if that's what they've set out to do. Major brands know that the cachet their names hold are as important as anything, and putting out product that's substandard (for the standard they're conventionally held to) is the absolute kiss of death. So if my favorite brand for thing X decides to move production from Canada, to Japan, to Korea, to China, to India (or some combination of those or other countries) I have zero doubt that the QC they do for all locations remains the same. Their names and survival depend upon that.
 

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Very interesting. I didn't know that about Airtex/Wells. Not specifically about Toyota OE parts, but one TN member reported buying a part at AutoZone and in the package was a made in Japan part, which is kinda surprising since most of their junk comes from China. Beck/Arnley too has mostly Chinese/Indian/or other countries, but every once in a while you'll get a made in Japan part. Same for Fel-Pro. Not often enough, though.
The most notable was an Airtex/Wells EGR vacuum modulator ordered for my old paseo. Opened the box and found a blue labeled Toyota part that was identical to the OE part on the engine. Quite the pleasant surprise :)
 

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The most notable was an Airtex/Wells EGR vacuum modulator ordered for my old paseo. Opened the box and found a blue labeled Toyota part that was identical to the OE part on the engine. Quite the pleasant surprise :)
Which just serves to support my earlier premise. The automotive parts supply chain these days is subject to change at a moment's notice for certain things, based on what's available at the correct spec at the lowest price at time of ordering.

Unless a given auto maker happens to own a significant stake in a given parts supplier, in which case one hand greases the other, what's OE/OEM is subject to change many times over the life of a production run. It doesn't actually change all that often, particularly for the big makers who do own significant stakes in their OE suppliers, but for the parts that don't come from those owned sources, they'll change.
 

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I have used Bosch, Denso, and NGK oxygen sensors on Toyotas with no problem.

I absolutely have no qualms about using NGK spark plugs on anything.

Be careful buying stuff on Amazon. Lots of times it'll be advertised as name brand with Toyota part number but be some generic Chinese part you get. I get a lot of parts through Amazon - often for a fraction what I would have to pay locally - but you have to be careful picking out the real non-counterfeit stuff.
 

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Enjoy O2 sensor diagnosis!
Isn't an underlying problem, that it's hard (maybe impossible?) to tell from the diagnostic codes alone which of the 2 Oxygen sensors needs replacing? I can sometimes narrow it down with an ohmmeter but I don't think this always helps.
 

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Isn't an underlying problem, that it's hard (maybe impossible?) to tell from the diagnostic codes alone which of the 2 Oxygen sensors needs replacing? I can sometimes narrow it down with an ohmmeter but I don't think this always helps.
Depends on the engine at that point. If it is an I4, either B1S1 or B1S2. Which is pre and then post catalytic converter. If it is a V6, then you gotta find out which bank is which. Otherwise Toyota's can be specific with their critical components and those are the times you want to stick with OEM Denso. The game is do you buy it once and repair it once or do you buy it twice and repair it twice. And if that does not work, did you do the proper electrical diagnosis to determine why the sensor is bad?
 

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Depends on the engine at that point. If it is an I4, either B1S1 or B1S2. Which is pre and then post catalytic converter. If it is a V6, then you gotta find out which bank is which.
Is there an official list of codes saying which bank is which oxygen sensor in which model? I wouldn't be surprised if the OP replaced the wrong oxygen sensor. I have been able to narrow it down in some blatant cases with an ohmmeter but I don't think this is always possible.
 

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Is there an official list of codes saying which bank is which oxygen sensor in which model? I wouldn't be surprised if the OP replaced the wrong oxygen sensor. I have been able to narrow it down in some blatant cases with an ohmmeter but I don't think this is always possible.
94,085
9/5/2018​
DTCEngine CodeN/AP0137O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage Bank 1 Sensor 2N/A
The specific code will let you know which one. Google it and you will find plenty of codes.
 

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DTCEngine CodeN/AP0137O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage Bank 1 Sensor 2N/A
The specific code will let you know which one. Google it and you will find plenty of codes.
OK, I must be stupid or something. I can use the interwebs just fine to look up that P0137 is O2 Sensor Bank 1 Sensor 2.

But how do I know from "Bank 1 Sensor 2", whether that is the one in the engine compartment near the first cat (or in some cases which of the two if it's a V6 or V8), or the one underneath the car near the second cat ?
 

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OK, I must be stupid or something. I can use the interwebs just fine to look up that P0137 is O2 Sensor Bank 1 Sensor 2.

But how do I know from "Bank 1 Sensor 2", whether that is the one in the engine compartment near the first cat (or in some cases which of the two if it's a V6 or V8), or the one underneath the car near the second cat ?
For a 2AZ-FE, it is gonna have two catalytic converters and two O2 sensors. These sensors will be located on the catalytic converter that is also the main exhaust header so the first O2 sensor will be B1S1 and the second O2 sensor will be B1S2. The second catalytic converter is not monitored. On a V6, you have to determine which bank is which as there are two banks.
 

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Use the firing order diagram of the cylinders to determine which is bank 1 or bank 2. Rear bank near firewall is bank 1 so your B1S1 doing your air/fuel monitoring and is in the exhaust manifold above the catalyst. B1S2 is monitoring the efficiency of the catalytic converters and will be downstream of them. Same applies to bank 2. Ohmmeter is mostly useful for checking heater circuit resistance. The O2 sensor heaters often die and go open circuit in the 5 volt AFR types and you will see the sensor signal output be stuck around 3 volts even when giving the engine a hard rev
 
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