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Discussion Starter #1
If a blue kerosene container and a red gasoline container both have a
triangle with the number 2 within it, does this mean both plastic containers
are made out of the same plastic?
A HESS attendant said to me his supervisor told him they can no longer let
kerosene customers use red plastic containers because one of the reasons is
the plastic isn't meant for kerosene.
 
R

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Discussion Starter #2
"mark_digital©" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> If a blue kerosene container and a red gasoline container both have a
> triangle with the number 2 within it, does this mean both plastic
> containers are made out of the same plastic?
> A HESS attendant said to me his supervisor told him they can no longer let
> kerosene customers use red plastic containers because one of the reasons
> is the plastic isn't meant for kerosene.
>
 
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Discussion Starter #3
"mark_digital©" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> If a blue kerosene container and a red gasoline container both have a
> triangle with the number 2 within it, does this mean both plastic
> containers are made out of the same plastic?
> A HESS attendant said to me his supervisor told him they can no longer let
> kerosene customers use red plastic containers because one of the reasons
> is the plastic isn't meant for kerosene.


The colors for fuel containers are regulated by laws: Red = gasoline,
yellow = diesel fuel, blue = kerosene.

Here is a link for the CA EPA:
http://www.arb.ca.gov/regact/pfc/2005/cp501.pdf

Here is one from WI: http://commerce.wi.gov/ERpdf/rps/ER-RPS-RedCanCard.pdf


--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)
 
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Discussion Starter #4
In article <[email protected]>
rokigawaATtristarassociatesDOTcom "Ray O" writes:

> The colors for fuel containers are regulated by laws: Red =
> gasoline, yellow = diesel fuel, blue = kerosene.
>
> [...]


*heh* Those US law-meisters might have kittens on looking in the
boot of the average UKian car: green for unleaded petrol. (FWIW,
red meant leaded, when that could still be purchased normally.)
--
Andrew Stephenson
 
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Discussion Starter #5
mark_digital© wrote:
> If a blue kerosene container and a red gasoline container both have a
> triangle with the number 2 within it, does this mean both plastic containers
> are made out of the same plastic?
> A HESS attendant said to me his supervisor told him they can no longer let
> kerosene customers use red plastic containers because one of the reasons is
> the plastic isn't meant for kerosene.
>
>

I think what you are describing are the recycling codes. The triangle is
actually three arrows with a number inside. Yours is HDPE (high
density polyethylene). HDPE is the same resin throughout the container
blow molding process, the only exception being a different ratio of
color pellets to change the final product color. HDPE is very adapt in
resisting the attack of petroleum products and is used widely throughout
the world. If you wish you can check the recycle code at the link below.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resin_identification_code
 
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Discussion Starter #6
The plastic may or may not be the same (my instinct says it is the same),
but the color is a signal of what the contents are. Red is always gasoline,
not red is never gasoline.





"mark_digital©" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> If a blue kerosene container and a red gasoline container both have a
> triangle with the number 2 within it, does this mean both plastic
> containers are made out of the same plastic?
> A HESS attendant said to me his supervisor told him they can no longer let
> kerosene customers use red plastic containers because one of the reasons
> is the plastic isn't meant for kerosene.
>
 
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