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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I'm new here to the forum so hiya from ny!

Anyway, I have a '93 Toyota pickup that needs some work. The parking brake on it is shot and doesnt work (not good considering its a standard) so I need to replace that. However I haven't a clue how one would go about doing such a thing. Any suggestions, instructions, anything to help me out here?

Also, my muffler decided to break the other day. It's from the catalytic converter back that needs replacing. Does anyone know the name of this piece so I might have better luck looking for it? Any help would be appreciated on all of this, and a many thanks to anyone who can help!
 

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Loose Nut
94 Toyota 2WD Pickup
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DJOutasync said:
The parking brake on it is shot and doesnt work (not good considering its a standard) so I need to replace that.
I'm not sure what you mean here. When you pull the brake handle, does it ratchet and lock? If not, I'd try and get a brake handle assembly from a junker.

Does the brake handle assembly lock and unlock OK, but just not set the brake? That's probably the parking brake cable itself, assuming the rear brake shoes are OK.

You may want to have the brake system inspected by a reputable shop.

Good luck!
 

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ya

Eh,

Luckily Arved covered the logical approach and I'll jump to conclusions :)

where the rear brake cable attaches to the lever in the inside/upper of your rear brake drum is a notorious spot for seizure. take the back tires off and completely dissasemble this entire component. I've seen this on a couple and have ahd to replace the component that houses the lever (sorry for the lack of proper names). beyond that, some good greasing and reassembly can do wonders for this part.

If those levers are seized up, then there is a good chance the entire system has not worked properly for a while in which case you should check the adjustment linkage. pull this backwards with the rear tires off the ground and see if you can stop them from spinning by pulling. It may be evident that the rear cables are seized. replace seized parts.

I've seen it where everything was moving, but there was so much stretch in the system that the cables were beyond their service limit. Nothing solved that except replacing the front and rear cables and voila ! stopage.

From what I found there is no where to get the e brake cables except from the dealer. not cheap, around $180 from what I recall. Adjust until pulling the ebrake handle produces 15 clicks I think? check this or I will, I think it is in the haynes manual. I'll get back to you on that one.

I don't know much, but I have gone through that system. Hard to screw around with old cables too much, they reasonably need to be replaced eventually.
Good luck,
Pete
 

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check to see if its broken or jsut seized. Mine broke where the front cable meets the spring (just in front of the gas tank on pass. side) I got a whole new cable from Toyota for $65. For some reason parts stores can only get the rear half, but not the front. The rear is around $45. If your handle is really easy to pull in and out, chances are its broken. Front cable replacement took me about an hr and rear part would probably take less time since its esaier to get to. Keep us informed.

Also, if the exhaust broke right after the cat, you could get a pipe and flange and clamp or weld it to fix it, or just get a new cat-back system. But the way you described it, its the whole cat-back system.

-Adam
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Many thanks to you all who replied here. To be more specific, I believe its the cable itself that broke, as the hand brake still pulls in and out, just extremely easily and it does nothing with the brakes themselves. It sounds like a pain in the @#$ to get the cable, so I will probably just have my mechanic take care of it. I got it quoted today and he said it was going to be close to $900 to replace the cable and such, as well as I think new pads as he said there was brake fluid being used to aid in braking and that was low too. And then on top of that, he'd tend to the whole muffler issue. I'm no genious, but I'm guessing I'm getting ripped here on cash. Anyone else think so or have suggestions or guides for a self doing job? Thanks again.
 

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ya

get yourself a haynes automotive manual and review the job.

if you don't have a basic set of wrenches and a socket set, then get one. You'll need a decent spot to work on things obviously, a jack and jack stands, a light and patience and common sense.

this is close to the most basic of all basic jobs. the front and rear brake cables aren't a bad job. if you have never worked on this stuff before, leave brake work itself to the shop. brakes are kind of important. I had this advise tossed at me, and as much as I valued it I have consciensiously (sp ? big friggin word) gone through the brake jobs succesfully but it is still good advice not knowing the nature of the caller here.

I got the rear cable from NAPA and it was nothing similar to matching. I would love to have found one aftermarket, but I went oen front and rear.

I find this stuff fun to work on and am constantly working beyond my experience but moving forward successfully into the unknown can be gratifying on my simple little level.

If you decide to go forward, let us know, I'll send some pictures and whatever amateur guidance I can offer.
Pete
 

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It's a double edged sword - there's very little that's simpler than the brake system, but on the other hand, there's nothing more important. Since I've been doing my brakes for decades, now, I wouldn't think of having anyone else do them. However, while it's pretty simple, it's not "idiot proof."

If you know someone who's mechanically competent, have them do it while you watch/help. Maybe watch on one side, then do the other while your friend supervises. You may also want to see if your local High School or Community College offers night classes in basic auto repair. I'd rather pay $100 and learn to do something for myself, than pay $100 and have it done for me, but I know I'm not normal in that regard.:naughty:

I haven't done the brake cable, but I suspect the hardest part will be routing the new cable through the firewall and dash area.

$900 sounds a bit high, but your a bit vague on the additional work you're getting done. Around here, most places charge about $100/axle to change pads or shoes (what they refer to as a "brake job"), and a bit more if drums/rotors are needed. Leaky brake pistons or calipers will drive the price even higher, and some mechanics would rather replace (passing the cost to you) than to rebuild (cheaper, but more labor intensive) to replace seals and such. I don't mean to make this sound as sinister as it sounds - on older vehicles, you can open up a caliper to replace the piston seals, and find bad corrosion or scoring of the bore that requires replacement anyway. So there's some waste in disassembling something, only to find a replacement is needed, and many shops just go for the replacement.

It's a good idea to get a manual, either something like the Haynes or Chilton manuals, or even the FSM (there's a sticky to a link at the top of the forum), if for no other reason than to become familiar with the work that's going to be done, and make a more informed decision on the estimate.

All the best,
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Much thanks for the advice and suggestions! I talked with one of my more mechanically inclined friends, whom suggested I just have the parking brake cable replaced by the mechanic and deal with that muffler issue for I guess $40, which suits my pocket just fine, and that he'd assist me in putting new brakes and such on it. I'm looking into getting the Haynes manual today or tomorrow, but while I'm at it, anyone got instructions for replacement of the brakes? I'd much appreciate it just so I have an idea of what we will be doing before it done. Pictures if possible would be appreciated too! Thanks for all the help. This forum has proved itself well for me!
 

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$900 is crazy!! If you lived close to me, id put in the brake cable for $50. But its your money. JMO

-Adam
 

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ya

Eh,

The best tip I've got for doing brakes is to completely dismantle and reassemble one side, then do the other. Don't take them both apart at the same time. Then if you are wondering how something goes back together as far as the springs and levers etc, you can look at the other side for reference.

You could replace your calipers, pads, have your rotors turned, new rear shoes, new front and rear cables FROM the stealership and new brake kits all around AND have enough over to feed you and all your friends booze and delmonico Rib Eye steaks for the weekend for $900.

The brake service kits gets you all new springs, levers and clips for each hub assembly.

Stay at er buddy,
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I plan to do the brakes within the next day or two. Till then, its driving the Saab that'll get me around. I only did the $40 at the mechanic to have the muffler taken care of and the brake cable for the parking brake done. All is well now with that. Many thanks for the links and comments on my doing the brakes. Should be done with that soon!
 

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hey, how did you get that pin out at the end of the e brake handle? some one told me it takes a special 100 dollar press... ive been trying to hammer it out from the hole on the back side...
thanks
patrick
 

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i used a dremel tool to grind out a little on the outer housing on the slider of the handle and twisted the handle clockwise really hard to get just enough clearance for the end of the cable to slip out. its hard to explain, but it worked. i should have took a pic of it when it was all torn apart.

-Adam
 

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Ok you guys are freaking me out...my front cable just broke, so I got under there and a look, one of those times I truly regret over undercoating,,,,my question before I order the cable from the dealer, does anyone have a diagram of the handle to cable brace, is there a spring, a clamp...is it simply feeding a cable through the housing to the center junction and voila ! Should Ibe concerned with special tools ? Any one who has done this, any advice would be great...it's snowing in Canada, not looking forward to getting under a truck at this time of year...oh well....love our Toyotas
 

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There is a little switch on top of the e-brake handle that can unlock it enough to slide it all the way in. (About an extra 1/4 inch) if you remove the electrical switch that operates your dashboard light, you can slide the handle in while holding the switch just far enough to take the cable end out of the brake handle. Hardly anything needs to even be removed. I was able to remove the entire brake cable with only a 10mm ratchet, pliers, and 12mm wrench. Hardest part is getting my giant cave man club hands into all the tiny little spots I needed to.

This video helped a bunch...
https://youtu.be/Z_7CyIsLAdA
 
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