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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
"Parking lot" 2008 Honda Accord Repair
Two days ago I picked up the urgent phone call. My former classmate, computer engineer was calling from the Honda dealership, where he went to check for the scratching noise coming from the rear wheel of his 2008 Honda Accord. The verdict was short and fast: the rear brake pads wore almost gone and he needed a new set of rear brakes (after 25000mi). This sounded very strange for me, because I used to know that the rear brakes on most cars are lasting 2 times then the front ones, so I asked the classmate to get a set of replacement pads, and stop by, so I could take look on the car.
I was so sure that the problem is “made up” by the dealer, that I even asked the my prospective customer to make sure that the pads are returnable, if they weren’t installed.
Then I went “on line” to check the common complaints about 2008 Honda Accord. In less then a minute, to my surprise, I’ve found then this car is equipped with special brake modulator, which allows more force to be applied to the rear brakes, to prevent “nose diving’ during the braking and because of that faster rate of rear pads wear was noted.
In less then 10 minutes my former classmate arrived. The inspection revealed my worst fears:
  • Three pads out of 4 were worn; one pad almost made metal to metal contact;
  • The wear indicator broke off for unknown reason [OEM part defect??)
  • The rear disc brake calipers required special tool to “screw back down” the pistons.

In order to bring the caliper pistons down, I improvised the tool using the adjustable wrench on the flat metal bar that fit the cutout in caliper piston. The recommended procedure calls for rotor removal and mounting caliper back on its support bracket before driving the piston down, however the car owner held the caliper against the suspension arm with the Channellock pliers while I rotated the pistons, which saved some time (without removal the rotors) .The rest of replacement went routine so the whole job took about 40 minutes (with hand tools).
I also saw the famous rotor to hub attachment screws (flat head Phillips) In order prevent them from rusting I put “antiseize” on their heads as well as into the two threaded holes for the push screws [used for rotor removal]. The flat head Phillips screws are not very good idea as they need to be removed using the anvil impact screwdriver [hex slot for 6mm Allen key is way more attractive option].
Overall, it was very good learning experience, as I am probably one among the pioneers working on one year old car.
Thanks for reading.
 

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Every road's a playground
2000 camry ce
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1,338 Posts
wth, so when you're braking, all four brakes are being used and you'll end up having to replace ALL four instead of 2 on other regular cars?
 

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That Acura Guy
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2,383 Posts
Damn wonder if the TSXs have the same braking system...
 

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1990 Celica GTS
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2,714 Posts
"Electronic Brake Distribution" Got it on my Lancer RaillArt and love it. It really reduce lots of nose dive. The only thing I don't like is it also reduce weight transfer to the front. Can't get the tail to lose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My 87 Camry station wagon has similar device, but it is mechanically operated and used if heavy load is placed in the wagon.
 

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Georgia
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1,197 Posts
Isuzu Axiom uses electronically controlled shocks to eliminate nose dive--Intelligent Suspension Control, IIRC.
 
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