Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hey everyone, i have to replace my head gasket, so im going to do a rebuild as well. i have a 22re, 192K 5-speed manual, and i think it still has a ways to go. nuff said. my question is do i have to take my block in to see what size piston i need? is there any other way to check? i dont think that the head gasket has been changed before, not sure though.
thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,403 Posts
Normally a bore gage is used to take measurements at various locations in the cylinder. You will need to check for bore size, taper, out of round cylinder, scoring, etc. A shop manual will have the spec’s to compare these measurements with. If you are taking the engine out, just take it down to a shop. They can do the measurements and either power hone the cylinders or bore them out. The cost is not that much to do this. If the engine is running OK, not burning oil, etc. might just replace the head gasket. Costs for an overhaul add up, one reason why people look for a good used engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
there is coolant getting into the oil as well, and coming out the exhaust, so i think i need to do a rebuild. How much difference is there between boring it out or just honing it? is it worth it, and how much will it decrease the life of my engine, assuming i can get it running again? what else would i have to replace besides the pistons, and rings? thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,403 Posts
Coolant in the crankcase will usually turn the oil into a white/gray thin milkshake consistency. If you are continuing to drive the car, change the oil often, as the coolant will degrade the oil and greatly effect engine wear. Coolant can also flush the oil out of whatever cylinder it is leaking into and over time cause cylinder scoring.

Did the engine overheat? What makes you think the engine needs a complete overhaul. It is possible just a head gasket is bad or a head has a crack.

Honing evolves removing a few thousands of cylinder metal material. Honing removes any metal glazing, very small machine marks and breaks up the cylinder surface. This allows the new piston rings and cylinder to seat and form a good seal.

Boring removes a lot more material, up to say 0.040. Boring is done when the cylinder has more damage (scoring); is tapered out of round. All this can happen with normal engine wear. Once the cylinder is bored it is honed to breakup the surface finish.

As to life, this depends on if the cylinders were hardened during manufacturing, some manufactures do this. If the cylinder is bored, this hardened material is removed. The result is the cylinder wears faster but may only go 200K instead of 300K miles (assuming decent maintenance). The machine shop should know if the cylinder is hardened.

As to overhauling the engine. Normally an engine overhaul includes changing the bearings and polishing the crankshaft, changing the oil pump, any timing belt or chain plus idle bearings, etc. The heads would have a valve regrind and maybe new guides installed and perhaps new cams. The costs add up fast, estimated if you do it yourself it at $1000-1500 for parts and machine shop labor. A good machine shop should be able to give you a range of costs.

The cost is one reason owners look around for a good used engine and just swap it out. There may also be rebuilt engines available or used ones from Japan, but cannot say for this engine.

I suggest you first determine the condition of the engine you have now. If just a head gasket or cracked head. Fixing this problem will be much cheaper then a rebuild, or rebuilt engine, but possible not as cheap as a good used engine. I don’t know what used engines are going for on this car.

It is also possible to do a cheap rebuild. If the cylinders are OK, just hone them. Some people even use sand paper although a honing tool is highly recommended. You may be able to rent them. They then install new rings, checking the bearings at the same time. If OK, they reuse them (remove and reinstall then in the exact same location). But new bearings are pretty cheap. Unless the engine is hotroded or run out of oil, they seldom fail. The oil pump should be OK, cams fine unless the coolant in the oil caused the lobes to be wiped out.

There is lots of info on the web about how to overhaul an engine and what to look for damage wise. Pick up a service manual to be able to work on the engine. Toyota Nation has some links to service manuals, check these out, worst case another Toyota model may use the same engine.

Either way with oil in the crankcase, you will need to do something, as the engine will wear out prematurely. This may make rebuilding it more expensive. If you go with another engine, make sure it can be used in this model/year of car. That such things are timing, knock sensors match up to whatever wiring the ECM has.

Also, this situation has be discussed many times on TN. Try doing a history search.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top