Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just two questions:

1.)
I've been told that if the spark plugs were replaced in a 2001 Camry LE with NGK plugs that timing the engine is unnecessary. Is this true?

2.)
My 2001 Camry LE - to the best of my knowledge - has never had a timing belt chain (although, I honestly don't know, as when I purchased the car, it already had 70,000 miles on it). Should I replace the belt now . . . or, are there "symptoms" I should be looking for in the operation that tells me I should replace the belt?

Thanks so much . . .

Larry
 

·
The Tri-Camry Family
Joined
·
1,175 Posts
#1 Timing the engine is not needed, it's not even adjustable. Just a simple task of changing the spark plugs with new NGK or Denso.

#2 It is recommended to change the timing belt around 90,000 mile, should be the same for both the I4 and V6. There's nothing wrong with changing it early. Some do say to change if it's more than 7-8 years old. If the timing belt do fail, the engine will just shut down with no damage (other than the danger of stopping on the freeway) When replacing the timing, it a good time to replace the water pump and pulley/tensioner all together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,075 Posts
1. It is not necessary to adjust the timing when replacing the spark plugs. That applies to whatever brand of spark plugs you use, although NGK and Denso are what Toyota uses from the factory and most people on this forum recommend sticking with them. Unless you misunderstood what the person said when he or she recommended adjusting the timing after simply replacing the spark plugs, I recommend you never take automotive advice from that person again.

2. You never said what engine your car has (I4 or V6) and what the current mileage is. If it is around 90,000 miles or just past that mileage I would change the timing belt as Yuko suggested, however, I would skip the waterpump change until the second timing belt change is needed. If you are well past that 90,000 mile mark, then I would go ahead and change the waterpump along with the timing belt.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
1. It is not necessary to adjust the timing when replacing the spark plugs. That applies to whatever brand of spark plugs you use, although NGK and Denso are what Toyota uses from the factory and most people on this forum recommend sticking with them. Unless you misunderstood what the person said when he or she recommended adjusting the timing after simply replacing the spark plugs, I recommend you never take automotive advice from that person again.

2. You never said what engine your car has (I4 or V6) and what the current mileage is. If it is around 90,000 miles or just past that mileage I would change the timing belt as Yuko suggested, however, I would skip the waterpump change until the second timing belt change is needed. If you are well past that 90,000 mile mark, then I would go ahead and change the waterpump along with the timing belt.

Mike
____________________________________________________________

Thanks so much Mike for your help here. Very much appreciated.
 

·
FLIP'N THE G-5 WHIP
Joined
·
895 Posts
#1 Timing the engine is not needed, it's not even adjustable. Just a simple task of changing the spark plugs with new NGK or Denso.

#2 It is recommended to change the timing belt around 90,000 mile, should be the same for both the I4 and V6. There's nothing wrong with changing it early. Some do say to change if it's more than 7-8 years old. If the timing belt do fail, the engine will just shut down with no damage (other than the danger of stopping on the freeway) When replacing the timing, it a good time to replace the water pump and pulley/tensioner all together.
In the 2005 camry this would be the serpintine belt? timing belt is the serpintine belt correct? otherwise there is the chain which does not need to be replaced?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,075 Posts
Your 2005 2AZ engine does not have a rubber timing belt; instead it has a metal timing chain, like a bicycle chain. It has no replacement interval, since it is designed to last the life of the engine.

A serpintine belt is one rubber belt that runs all of the belt driven accessories, That would be the alternator, power steering pump, a/c, etc. Your car does have one of these.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I've got 185K on my 2009 Camry and just put the second serpentine belt in it. (It also got an idler wheel and an alternator.)
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top