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Normally this would be in social ill.. there is always someone afraid for no reason. But i put this in politic because the crazy finally weaponized this "playing". See how your government regulation works? They regulate games children play too. Gov regulation is like a bullet that once fired it only gain speed and keep on going. Best don't pull the trigger.... politicians can't wait to pull the trigger.
The more I read the more I've come to the realization that although California is completely screwed up, Kansas seems to be running up their in the top half dozen states with crazy laws related to political correctness, social engineering of children's lives, etc. To charge a child for a felony for imitating a gun with a finger is truly insane.



I just discussed this with my kids. My son who is in 7th grade were told they weren't allowed to finger gun in school. I asked if he knew he could be arrested and he said yes. Wtf??!?
Sorry, but that is so screwed up it warrants the colloquial comment of THAT'S FUCKED UP! That is both a political ill and a societal ill. I have disappoint in America.
 

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And come to think of it, why stop at creating felonies and arresting kids for imitating a gun with their fingers? Seriously, why not outlaw children speaking the words, "Bang, bang!" because it imitates gunfire? Or why not ban all children from speaking the words "bomb", or "kill," regardless the context in which it's spoken? It isn't only patently absurd to ban pointed fingers and the like, but as always once you ban or regulate one thing is is ALWAYS a slippery slope to keep including more and more. Humanity seems to be relentlessly stupid in that regard, reviewing world history.
 

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Normally this would be in social ill.. there is always someone afraid for no reason. But i put this in politic because the crazy finally weaponized this "playing". See how your government regulation works? They regulate games children play too.


Gov regulation is like a bullet that once fired it only gain speed and keep on going. Best don't pull the trigger.... politicians can't wait to pull the trigger.
I wonder what else is going on here that's not being reported. I feel like there must be some type of context that exists as a justification for arresting a middle schooler for such behavior.

I looked up the story on several of the local news sites and several of them indicated that the school resource officer felt that the arrest was necessary due to the past history of the student- but declined to say what that history was because she was a minor. The principal also declined to say what the student has done in the past, citing that she is a minor so sharing that information would be inappropriate.

So- I see this from one of two ways-
One: the district is super sensitive to threats of violence as a way to pacify parents who don't want their school to be the next one that makes the news for a mass shooting (which is laughable, given how rare school shootings actually are considering the number of schools in this country). My wife's elementary school is super sensitive to threats of violence, lock down drills, and evacuation drills. Twice per year they have to practice walking to the nearest "safe zone" in case of an imminent threat- which is about a mile away, a twenty minute walk.
Two: This kid has a past history of making smaller, less serious threats that she has actually carried out. Due to the fact that she is a minor, her record is sealed so we can't be sure of what's she done in the past, but if she has brought a weapon to school in the past, or has a history of fighting, mental illness, or something similar, charging her with a felony might be something that is being used to send a message both to her and others that this type of shit won't be tolerated. I'm guessing the felony charge won't stick- but likely would be pleaded down to a misdemeanor.

You might say that if this kid has a prior history of committing violent acts, why hasn't she been expelled? That's simple, at least if she is a student with special needs or has a disability. The law is really technical in those type of cases and, at least in my state, really prevents schools from expelling students for activity that stems from their disability. One example: One of my students last year was diagnosed with EBD (Emotional/Behavioral Disability). 99% of the time, he is a normal kid who gets along with his classmates and isn't a behavior problem. That said, some things trigger his disability / anger. For him, the main thing that triggers his anger is when he feels like he is not being treated fairly. He was late to one of his classes last year. He wasn't being irresponsible- there was a fight in the halls and because a crowd had gathered around it, he had a really hard time getting through that crowd to make it to class. He was about thirty seconds late- and his teacher, who didn't know there was a fight (it was on a different floor), told him to get a late pass. The kid exploded. He began kicking the door, yelling profanity at the top of his lungs, and eventually broke the glass in the door before a security guard was able to remove him and get his IEP teacher to calm him down. For a normal student, that would result in an expulsion. He was given an expulsion hearing- which for students with special needs also includes a manifestation hearing. During that manifestation hearing, it was determined that his actions were a result of his disability. As a result, he wasn't expelled and was allowed to return to school after a suspension, counseling, and having his parents agree to pay for the damages to the door. I bring up this long story to lay out a point- the kid in Kansas could indeed have a very worrisome history of violence- violence that might have resulted in many suspensions, interventions, and counseling. If the kid has special needs and the prior acts were a result of those special needs, they likely weren't allowed to be expelled due to the law. That said- the law usually doesn't make exceptions for disabilities like EBD when a criminal act is committed and the police get involved.

Unfortunately, because she is a minor, none of those things can be disclosed to the public unless her parents make it public. The school and police aren't able to disclose those things because of her status as a minor.

It's something that we really struggle with in terms of our students with special needs that display behavior that isn't acceptable in society. While they are in school, they are protected by the law because of their disability- but we constantly are trying to reinforce in them that once they leave our school- or anytime they are in public- their disability won't be taken into account by a police officer during a traffic stop, or if they get arrested for shoplifting. Certain illegal acts- like making personal threats, even in school, can result in real legal consequences for all students, regardless of disability.
 

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You might say that if this kid has a prior history of committing violent acts, why hasn't she been expelled? That's simple, at least if she is a student with special needs or has a disability. The law is really technical in those type of cases and, at least in my state, really prevents schools from expelling students for activity that stems from their disability.
Do you punish the kid when they misbehave or do you combine them and just give them a death sentence for all of the minor misbehave at once?

Getting a felony for a hand gesture is wrong on so many levels. Add to that she is 13. Sure, lets see all the facts 1st. Just hope there will be justice, as in somebody need to hold accountable.

One example: One of my students last year was diagnosed with EBD (Emotional/Behavioral Disability). 99% of the time, he is a normal kid who gets along with his classmates and isn't a behavior problem. That said, some things trigger his disability / anger. For him, the main thing that triggers his anger is when he feels like he is not being treated fairly. He was late to one of his classes last year. He wasn't being irresponsible- there was a fight in the halls and because a crowd had gathered around it, he had a really hard time getting through that crowd to make it to class. He was about thirty seconds late- and his teacher, who didn't know there was a fight (it was on a different floor), told him to get a late pass. The kid exploded. He began kicking the door, yelling profanity at the top of his lungs, and eventually broke the glass in the door before a security guard was able to remove him and get his IEP teacher to calm him down. For a normal student, that would result in an expulsion.
In a none crazy world, that kid just get some punishment and need some straiten out with his issue. Need to slap some sense into him too.

He was given an expulsion hearing- which for students with special needs also includes a manifestation hearing. During that manifestation hearing, it was determined that his actions were a result of his disability.
So many special needs now a day it's crazy. A world that run on every tiny little "protected class". Reminds me of this video and sadly it's becoming reality.
 
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