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Almost 1/2 Million Miles!
92 Toyota Camry XLE
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Greetings everyone!

Hope the new year has done you good so, far!

My daughter is dying for me to get a Toyota Prius!

She has encouraged me to consider buying a 8 to 10 year old Prius. To save $$$ in case the Battery goes bad, she has even shown me at least three videos of some so called Electrical Mechanics that have taken OUT that Large Battery and shown everyone how easy it is to detect the offending Cell from the assembly and how to replace with a fresh cell. However, all this is great but, they are not addressing the rest of the cells that have been cycled hundreds of times!

You are doing all the labor to replace one or two of the 32 cells but, you are now mixing fresh Cell into a batch of tired older Cells. Tell me what's wrong with that picture! The only way to do it correctly is to buy a new Battery Assembly for $3,500 and that's it! These YouTube Mechanics really piss me off to no end.

Anyway, would like to see any expert responses from Die-Hard Prius owners about your thoughts on all this?

I am finally selling my 1992 Toyota Camry XLE (5S-FE Engine & A140E Auto Transmission) with 513,863 original miles without any rebuilt history off to a College Student.

Thank you!
 

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I am not a Prius person, but I can assure you that the technology changes. The first gen (2000-03) was an electrified Echo. The second gen (04-11) is when they became mainstream. The 3rd gen (11 or 12-14) they got a larger 1.8l gas engine and plug in option. The newest (2015 up) claim Prius C gas mileage.The Prius also doesn't depreciate as much as you'd like, with a 160,000 mile one priced like it had 80 or 90k. If your daughter wants a Prius so badly, let her buy one. Without her input, which size or type of car fits your needs?
 

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My daughter is dying for me to get a Toyota Prius!
She has encouraged me to consider buying a 8 to 10 year old Prius.
Why? What do you want?

To save $$$ in case the Battery goes bad, she has even shown me at least three videos of some so called Electrical Mechanics that have taken OUT that Large Battery and shown everyone how easy
High voltage DC is a specialty, even among electricians. I think of monkeying with the traction battery as being beyond the skills of the ordinary owner. Besides, a ten year old nickel metal hydride battery, is nothing special. They were meant to last the life of the car.

it is to detect the offending Cell from the assembly and how to replace with a fresh cell. However, all this is great but, they are not addressing the rest of the cells that have been cycled hundreds of times!
What you could also consider is getting a traction battery out of another 3rd gen (I think she is suggesting 3rd gen?) and simply replacing the whole thing. The main source for used traction batteries is cars that have been parted out after a front end collision. The battery is armored pretty well and almost always survives. By shopping around you can get a pack that has either less years or less miles than the one you have now, and voila' your car just got younger.

You are doing all the labor to replace one or two of the 32 cells but, you are now mixing fresh Cell into a batch of tired older Cells. Tell me what's wrong with that picture!
People do get into rebuilding batteries, but usually because they want to, not because their daughter liked a car. It gets kind of technical.

Anyway, would like to see any expert responses from Die-Hard Prius owners about your thoughts on all this?
I am having trouble with the thought of buying a car that you expect will die soon. If you/she is that nervous maybe you should look at a younger car, skip the whole melodramatic death scene.

If you just absolutely, positively cannot trust that NiMH battery, there are lots of cars available with just a gas engine, no big batteries. Why go out of your way to buy stress?

I am finally selling my 1992 Toyota Camry ...with 513,863 original miles
If you want a car that has potential to go for an unusually long time, the Prius is a good candidate.
 

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This is just my personal view, I would never " buy " a hybrid anything, id lease one, at lease end give it back and get another one. Hybrid technology is advancing on a daily basis, not that I'm a technology person but if it means more battery life, more battery power, better driving experience, why be stuck in the stone age?

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk
 
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