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G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Earlier I expressed concerns about whether first responders are trained
in the risks accompanying the extraction of victims from a wrecked
hybird. The group's answers pretty well convinced me that they are
trained and that my uninformed EMT friend here in western NY state was
an exception to the rule.

But now there's evidence it might be a wider problem than some believe.
Last week's issue of the Lincoln County (Maine) News has a long article
about confusion in handling a wrecked Prius. The story is too long to
reproduce here. Suffice to say that the "experts" the reporter
consulted in writing the story gave him bad information. I've sent the
paper the URL of Toyota's online information for first responders. For
latecomers, that URL is
http://techinfo.toyota.com/
Click on the link for EMERGENCY RESPONSE & HYBRID INFORMATION, then on
the model of your choice.

I'm trying to organize a series of regional meetings for first
responders where a knowledgeable Toyota rep can disseminate the facts.
I'd like to see one in each of western NY state's population centers
with printed invitations sent to firehouses and ambulance crews.

Ray O or other Toyota-savvy contributors: any suggestions on how to
proceed?

Thanks.

Brent
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
"Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:121220052114581583%[email protected]
> Earlier I expressed concerns about whether first responders are trained
> in the risks accompanying the extraction of victims from a wrecked
> hybird. The group's answers pretty well convinced me that they are
> trained and that my uninformed EMT friend here in western NY state was
> an exception to the rule.
>
> But now there's evidence it might be a wider problem than some believe.
> Last week's issue of the Lincoln County (Maine) News has a long article
> about confusion in handling a wrecked Prius. The story is too long to
> reproduce here. Suffice to say that the "experts" the reporter
> consulted in writing the story gave him bad information. I've sent the
> paper the URL of Toyota's online information for first responders. For
> latecomers, that URL is
> http://techinfo.toyota.com/
> Click on the link for EMERGENCY RESPONSE & HYBRID INFORMATION, then on
> the model of your choice.
>
> I'm trying to organize a series of regional meetings for first
> responders where a knowledgeable Toyota rep can disseminate the facts.
> I'd like to see one in each of western NY state's population centers
> with printed invitations sent to firehouses and ambulance crews.
>
> Ray O or other Toyota-savvy contributors: any suggestions on how to
> proceed?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Brent


Western NY is covered by Toyota's NY regional office in West Caldwell, NJ.
Maine is covered by the Boston Regional office in Mansfield, MA. Those
offices have a staff that trains dealer personnel as well as field technical
specialists. They are the most knowledgeable people about hybrid systems.
The problem is that they already have enough work to keep them busy
full-time and there is no way they would have the time or resources to
conduct training for every fire department in the region.

I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I have
seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several different
fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped with
the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled back.
The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the door
is spread open. Whether the car was on its wheels or on its roof, the
rescue team did not disturb the floor pan. Toyota hybrids have the high
voltage wiring has bright yellow sheathing that runs under the floor so the
chances of them having to possibly cut through the high voltage wiring is
pretty slim.

I believe that most first responders use equipment and methods approved by
the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association). The most logical way to
train first responders is to have the NFPA issue a bulletin or offer a
class.
--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
In article <[email protected]>,
Ray O <[email protected]> wrote:

> "Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:121220052114581583%[email protected]
> > Earlier I expressed concerns about whether first responders are trained
> > in the risks accompanying the extraction of victims from a wrecked
> > hybird. The group's answers pretty well convinced me that they are
> > trained and that my uninformed EMT friend here in western NY state was
> > an exception to the rule.
> >
> > But now there's evidence it might be a wider problem than some believe.
> > Last week's issue of the Lincoln County (Maine) News has a long article
> > about confusion in handling a wrecked Prius. The story is too long to
> > reproduce here. Suffice to say that the "experts" the reporter
> > consulted in writing the story gave him bad information. I've sent the
> > paper the URL of Toyota's online information for first responders. For
> > latecomers, that URL is
> > http://techinfo.toyota.com/
> > Click on the link for EMERGENCY RESPONSE & HYBRID INFORMATION, then on
> > the model of your choice.
> >
> > I'm trying to organize a series of regional meetings for first
> > responders where a knowledgeable Toyota rep can disseminate the facts.
> > I'd like to see one in each of western NY state's population centers
> > with printed invitations sent to firehouses and ambulance crews.
> >
> > Ray O or other Toyota-savvy contributors: any suggestions on how to
> > proceed?
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> > Brent

>
> Western NY is covered by Toyota's NY regional office in West Caldwell, NJ.
> Maine is covered by the Boston Regional office in Mansfield, MA. Those
> offices have a staff that trains dealer personnel as well as field technical
> specialists. They are the most knowledgeable people about hybrid systems.
> The problem is that they already have enough work to keep them busy
> full-time and there is no way they would have the time or resources to
> conduct training for every fire department in the region.
>
> I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I have
> seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several different
> fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
> car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
> roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
> occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped with
> the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled back.
> The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the door
> is spread open. Whether the car was on its wheels or on its roof, the
> rescue team did not disturb the floor pan. Toyota hybrids have the high
> voltage wiring has bright yellow sheathing that runs under the floor so the
> chances of them having to possibly cut through the high voltage wiring is
> pretty slim.
>
> I believe that most first responders use equipment and methods approved by
> the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association). The most logical way to
> train first responders is to have the NFPA issue a bulletin or offer a
> class.


Brilliant. Thank you.

Brent
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The dealer I work for has first responders in the facility approximately
twice a year for a couple of hours to go over the Prius and Highlander.
The session is led by a hybrid tech, and covers all the basics like
locations of high-tension wires and service plug location. This is stricly
a deal between our organization and the local rescue personel, however. If
you are not affiliated with a dealer in your area, I would suggest taking
Rays advice and contacting your zones office.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
"Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
snip

>I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I have
>seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several different
>fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
>car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
>roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
>occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped with
>the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled back.
>The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the door
>is spread open.


Thank you very much Ray...you've given me the proper name for
that very useful tool "Hurst tool". I cringe everytime I hear
someone, especially an educated well spoken news announcer whose
speech I admire say "They used the 'jaws of life' on the car".
Sounds so affected.
--

-Gord.
(use gordon in email)
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
"Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:131220050646047829%[email protected]
> In article <e1d8d$439e6daa$180fead6$2200[email protected]>,
> Ray O <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> "Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:121220052114581583%[email protected]
>> > Earlier I expressed concerns about whether first responders are trained
>> > in the risks accompanying the extraction of victims from a wrecked
>> > hybird. The group's answers pretty well convinced me that they are
>> > trained and that my uninformed EMT friend here in western NY state was
>> > an exception to the rule.
>> >
>> > But now there's evidence it might be a wider problem than some believe.
>> > Last week's issue of the Lincoln County (Maine) News has a long article
>> > about confusion in handling a wrecked Prius. The story is too long to
>> > reproduce here. Suffice to say that the "experts" the reporter
>> > consulted in writing the story gave him bad information. I've sent the
>> > paper the URL of Toyota's online information for first responders. For
>> > latecomers, that URL is
>> > http://techinfo.toyota.com/
>> > Click on the link for EMERGENCY RESPONSE & HYBRID INFORMATION, then on
>> > the model of your choice.
>> >
>> > I'm trying to organize a series of regional meetings for first
>> > responders where a knowledgeable Toyota rep can disseminate the facts.
>> > I'd like to see one in each of western NY state's population centers
>> > with printed invitations sent to firehouses and ambulance crews.
>> >
>> > Ray O or other Toyota-savvy contributors: any suggestions on how to
>> > proceed?
>> >
>> > Thanks.
>> >
>> > Brent

>>
>> Western NY is covered by Toyota's NY regional office in West Caldwell,
>> NJ.
>> Maine is covered by the Boston Regional office in Mansfield, MA. Those
>> offices have a staff that trains dealer personnel as well as field
>> technical
>> specialists. They are the most knowledgeable people about hybrid
>> systems.
>> The problem is that they already have enough work to keep them busy
>> full-time and there is no way they would have the time or resources to
>> conduct training for every fire department in the region.
>>
>> I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I
>> have
>> seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several
>> different
>> fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
>> car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
>> roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
>> occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped
>> with
>> the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled
>> back.
>> The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the
>> door
>> is spread open. Whether the car was on its wheels or on its roof, the
>> rescue team did not disturb the floor pan. Toyota hybrids have the high
>> voltage wiring has bright yellow sheathing that runs under the floor so
>> the
>> chances of them having to possibly cut through the high voltage wiring is
>> pretty slim.
>>
>> I believe that most first responders use equipment and methods approved
>> by
>> the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association). The most logical way
>> to
>> train first responders is to have the NFPA issue a bulletin or offer a
>> class.

>
> Brilliant. Thank you.
>
> Brent


You're welcome!
--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
"Gord Beaman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
> snip
>
>>I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I have
>>seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several
>>different
>>fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
>>car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
>>roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
>>occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped
>>with
>>the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled
>>back.
>>The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the
>>door
>>is spread open.

>
> Thank you very much Ray...you've given me the proper name for
> that very useful tool "Hurst tool". I cringe everytime I hear
> someone, especially an educated well spoken news announcer whose
> speech I admire say "They used the 'jaws of life' on the car".
> Sounds so affected.
> --
>
> -Gord.
> (use gordon in email)



I call it the Hurst tool but according to this web site
http://www.hurstjaws.com/Home/Default.Asp it is a Hurst Jaws of Life. I
don't think there is any connection to Hurst shifters, but the "Hurst" name
stuck in my mind.
--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
On Tue, 13 Dec 2005 14:38:16 GMT, Gord Beaman <[email protected]>
wrote:
>"Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:


>>I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I have
>>seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several different
>>fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
>>car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
>>roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
>>occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped with
>>the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled back.
>>The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the door
>>is spread open.

>
>Thank you very much Ray...you've given me the proper name for
>that very useful tool "Hurst tool". I cringe everytime I hear
>someone, especially an educated well spoken news announcer whose
>speech I admire say "They used the 'jaws of life' on the car".
>Sounds so affected.


http://www.hurstjaws.com
http://www.hurstjaws.com/home/companyprofile.asp

It was invented by the same Hurst that makes shifters.

The impetus for initial development was they needed something to
peel race car drivers out of what was left of the car after a 200-MPH
wreck - the driver was still alive, but the roll cage that saved his
(or her) life while moving is a liability after they come to a stop.

And when (not if) there's leaking fuel around, you obviously can't
use a torch or a chop-saw to get in. That's not the kind of
excitement that 50,000 fans in the stands need to see.

Hey - look what I found while Googling this:

> First Rescue Tools Designed for Improved Safety in Hybrid
> Vehicle Rescues are Introduced by Hurst Centaur
>
>SHELBY, N.C.--Nov. 2, 2005--Responding to the need to protect
>rescue workers from electical dangers when extricating victims
>from hybrid electric vehicles, Hurst has introduced a new
>specialized rescue tool. Similar in power and construction to
>other popular Jaws of Life hydraulic spreaders and cutters the
>new Cen SC14 Fi Combination tool and the Cen C9 Fi Cutter boast
>unique electrical current insulation providing extra safety for
>rescuers when cutting charged parts of all kinds. The tools are
>being sold under the Hurst Centaur brand.

(Fair Use Snip after first paragraph)

Complete: http://www.theautochannel.com/news/2005/11/02/147306.html

--<< Bruce >>--

--
Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
5737 Kanan Rd. #359, Agoura CA 91301 (818) 889-9545
Spamtrapped address: Remove the python and the invalid, and use a net.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
"Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
>"Gord Beaman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> "Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> snip
>>
>>>I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I have
>>>seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several
>>>different
>>>fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
>>>car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
>>>roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
>>>occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped
>>>with
>>>the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled
>>>back.
>>>The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the
>>>door
>>>is spread open.

>>
>> Thank you very much Ray...you've given me the proper name for
>> that very useful tool "Hurst tool". I cringe everytime I hear
>> someone, especially an educated well spoken news announcer whose
>> speech I admire say "They used the 'jaws of life' on the car".
>> Sounds so affected.
>> --
>>
>> -Gord.
>> (use gordon in email)

>
>
>I call it the Hurst tool but according to this web site
>http://www.hurstjaws.com/Home/Default.Asp it is a Hurst Jaws of Life. I
>don't think there is any connection to Hurst shifters, but the "Hurst" name
>stuck in my mind.


Thanks...I Googled it (hadn't thought to b4) got lots of hits for
'Hurst tool' (none for Hurst Jaws of Life)...anyway, maybe I'm
too critical (wife agrees).

"The Jaws Of Life!!" <gag>
--

-Gord.
(use gordon in email)
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
"Gord Beaman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Gord Beaman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>> "Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>> snip
>>>
>>>>I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I
>>>>have
>>>>seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several
>>>>different
>>>>fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
>>>>car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
>>>>roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip.
>>>>The
>>>>occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped
>>>>with
>>>>the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled
>>>>back.
>>>>The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the
>>>>door
>>>>is spread open.
>>>
>>> Thank you very much Ray...you've given me the proper name for
>>> that very useful tool "Hurst tool". I cringe everytime I hear
>>> someone, especially an educated well spoken news announcer whose
>>> speech I admire say "They used the 'jaws of life' on the car".
>>> Sounds so affected.
>>> --
>>>
>>> -Gord.
>>> (use gordon in email)

>>
>>
>>I call it the Hurst tool but according to this web site
>>http://www.hurstjaws.com/Home/Default.Asp it is a Hurst Jaws of Life. I
>>don't think there is any connection to Hurst shifters, but the "Hurst"
>>name
>>stuck in my mind.

>
> Thanks...I Googled it (hadn't thought to b4) got lots of hits for
> 'Hurst tool' (none for Hurst Jaws of Life)...anyway, maybe I'm
> too critical (wife agrees).
>
> "The Jaws Of Life!!" <gag>
> --
>
> -Gord.
> (use gordon in email)


It could have been called
- Hurst Snip 'N Spread
- hydraulic prier and extrication device (H.Y.P.E.D.)
- Hurst opener and spreader (HO spreader)
--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In article <[email protected]>,
Ray O <[email protected]> wrote:

> "Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:121220052114581583%[email protected]
> > Earlier I expressed concerns about whether first responders are trained
> > in the risks accompanying the extraction of victims from a wrecked
> > hybird. The group's answers pretty well convinced me that they are
> > trained and that my uninformed EMT friend here in western NY state was
> > an exception to the rule.
> >
> > But now there's evidence it might be a wider problem than some believe.
> > Last week's issue of the Lincoln County (Maine) News has a long article
> > about confusion in handling a wrecked Prius. The story is too long to
> > reproduce here. Suffice to say that the "experts" the reporter
> > consulted in writing the story gave him bad information. I've sent the
> > paper the URL of Toyota's online information for first responders. For
> > latecomers, that URL is
> > http://techinfo.toyota.com/
> > Click on the link for EMERGENCY RESPONSE & HYBRID INFORMATION, then on
> > the model of your choice.
> >
> > I'm trying to organize a series of regional meetings for first
> > responders where a knowledgeable Toyota rep can disseminate the facts.
> > I'd like to see one in each of western NY state's population centers
> > with printed invitations sent to firehouses and ambulance crews.
> >
> > Ray O or other Toyota-savvy contributors: any suggestions on how to
> > proceed?
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> > Brent

>
> Western NY is covered by Toyota's NY regional office in West Caldwell, NJ.
> Maine is covered by the Boston Regional office in Mansfield, MA. Those
> offices have a staff that trains dealer personnel as well as field technical
> specialists. They are the most knowledgeable people about hybrid systems.
> The problem is that they already have enough work to keep them busy
> full-time and there is no way they would have the time or resources to
> conduct training for every fire department in the region.
>
> I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I have
> seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several different
> fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
> car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
> roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
> occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped with
> the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled back.
> The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the door
> is spread open. Whether the car was on its wheels or on its roof, the
> rescue team did not disturb the floor pan. Toyota hybrids have the high
> voltage wiring has bright yellow sheathing that runs under the floor so the
> chances of them having to possibly cut through the high voltage wiring is
> pretty slim.
>
> I believe that most first responders use equipment and methods approved by
> the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association). The most logical way to
> train first responders is to have the NFPA issue a bulletin or offer a
> class.


Would the right person from a Toyota store's bodyshop might be a
satisfactory instructor about extricating people from a hybrid? In the
absence of a specialist, I mean.

Brent
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
"Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
>"Gord Beaman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> "Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"Gord Beaman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>>news:[email protected]
>>>> "Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>> snip
>>>>
>>>>>I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I
>>>>>have
>>>>>seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several
>>>>>different
>>>>>fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
>>>>>car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
>>>>>roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip.
>>>>>The
>>>>>occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped
>>>>>with
>>>>>the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled
>>>>>back.
>>>>>The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the
>>>>>door
>>>>>is spread open.
>>>>
>>>> Thank you very much Ray...you've given me the proper name for
>>>> that very useful tool "Hurst tool". I cringe everytime I hear
>>>> someone, especially an educated well spoken news announcer whose
>>>> speech I admire say "They used the 'jaws of life' on the car".
>>>> Sounds so affected.
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>> -Gord.
>>>> (use gordon in email)
>>>
>>>
>>>I call it the Hurst tool but according to this web site
>>>http://www.hurstjaws.com/Home/Default.Asp it is a Hurst Jaws of Life. I
>>>don't think there is any connection to Hurst shifters, but the "Hurst"
>>>name
>>>stuck in my mind.

>>
>> Thanks...I Googled it (hadn't thought to b4) got lots of hits for
>> 'Hurst tool' (none for Hurst Jaws of Life)...anyway, maybe I'm
>> too critical (wife agrees).
>>
>> "The Jaws Of Life!!" <gag>
>> --
>>
>> -Gord.
>> (use gordon in email)

>
>It could have been called
> - Hurst Snip 'N Spread
> - hydraulic prier and extrication device (H.Y.P.E.D.)
> - Hurst opener and spreader (HO spreader)


Well, hell, anyone of those are better than 'the jaws of life'

Can't you just see it?...it's 4 am, a dark dirty wet night on the
freeway...cop cars, firetruck and ambulance lights flashing all
over...Fire Chief is a big burly guy who's looking into the
crumpled up sportscar. Camera pans in for a closeup of his rugged
tough rain soaked features as he squints from under his big red
fireman's helmet over his shoulder and sings out "hey jimbobby!
please bring me a set of those 'jaws of life' will you please"?

Just doesn't cut it...
--

-Gord.
(use gordon in email)
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
"Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:131220051908560287%[email protected]
> In article <[email protected]>,
> Ray O <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> "Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:121220052114581583%[email protected]
>> > Earlier I expressed concerns about whether first responders are trained
>> > in the risks accompanying the extraction of victims from a wrecked
>> > hybird. The group's answers pretty well convinced me that they are
>> > trained and that my uninformed EMT friend here in western NY state was
>> > an exception to the rule.
>> >
>> > But now there's evidence it might be a wider problem than some believe.
>> > Last week's issue of the Lincoln County (Maine) News has a long article
>> > about confusion in handling a wrecked Prius. The story is too long to
>> > reproduce here. Suffice to say that the "experts" the reporter
>> > consulted in writing the story gave him bad information. I've sent the
>> > paper the URL of Toyota's online information for first responders. For
>> > latecomers, that URL is
>> > http://techinfo.toyota.com/
>> > Click on the link for EMERGENCY RESPONSE & HYBRID INFORMATION, then on
>> > the model of your choice.
>> >
>> > I'm trying to organize a series of regional meetings for first
>> > responders where a knowledgeable Toyota rep can disseminate the facts.
>> > I'd like to see one in each of western NY state's population centers
>> > with printed invitations sent to firehouses and ambulance crews.
>> >
>> > Ray O or other Toyota-savvy contributors: any suggestions on how to
>> > proceed?
>> >
>> > Thanks.
>> >
>> > Brent

>>
>> Western NY is covered by Toyota's NY regional office in West Caldwell,
>> NJ.
>> Maine is covered by the Boston Regional office in Mansfield, MA. Those
>> offices have a staff that trains dealer personnel as well as field
>> technical
>> specialists. They are the most knowledgeable people about hybrid
>> systems.
>> The problem is that they already have enough work to keep them busy
>> full-time and there is no way they would have the time or resources to
>> conduct training for every fire department in the region.
>>
>> I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I
>> have
>> seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several
>> different
>> fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
>> car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
>> roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
>> occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped
>> with
>> the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled
>> back.
>> The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the
>> door
>> is spread open. Whether the car was on its wheels or on its roof, the
>> rescue team did not disturb the floor pan. Toyota hybrids have the high
>> voltage wiring has bright yellow sheathing that runs under the floor so
>> the
>> chances of them having to possibly cut through the high voltage wiring is
>> pretty slim.
>>
>> I believe that most first responders use equipment and methods approved
>> by
>> the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association). The most logical way
>> to
>> train first responders is to have the NFPA issue a bulletin or offer a
>> class.

>
> Would the right person from a Toyota store's bodyshop might be a
> satisfactory instructor about extricating people from a hybrid? In the
> absence of a specialist, I mean.
>
> Brent


Every dealership certified to sell hybrid vehicles must have at least 1
technician who has taken Toyota's class. The hybrid-certified technician(s)
at the dealership would be better candidates to pass on info to first
responders. Body shop techs probably do not have the training to handle
what a first responder needs to know.
--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
"Gord Beaman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:p[email protected]
> "Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Gord Beaman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>> "Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>>"Gord Beaman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>>>news:[email protected]
>>>>> "Ray O" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>>> snip
>>>>>
>>>>>>I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I
>>>>>>have
>>>>>>seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several
>>>>>>different
>>>>>>fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to
>>>>>>the
>>>>>>car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on
>>>>>>its
>>>>>>roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip.
>>>>>>The
>>>>>>occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped
>>>>>>with
>>>>>>the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled
>>>>>>back.
>>>>>>The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then
>>>>>>the
>>>>>>door
>>>>>>is spread open.
>>>>>
>>>>> Thank you very much Ray...you've given me the proper name for
>>>>> that very useful tool "Hurst tool". I cringe everytime I hear
>>>>> someone, especially an educated well spoken news announcer whose
>>>>> speech I admire say "They used the 'jaws of life' on the car".
>>>>> Sounds so affected.
>>>>> --
>>>>>
>>>>> -Gord.
>>>>> (use gordon in email)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>I call it the Hurst tool but according to this web site
>>>>http://www.hurstjaws.com/Home/Default.Asp it is a Hurst Jaws of Life.
>>>>I
>>>>don't think there is any connection to Hurst shifters, but the "Hurst"
>>>>name
>>>>stuck in my mind.
>>>
>>> Thanks...I Googled it (hadn't thought to b4) got lots of hits for
>>> 'Hurst tool' (none for Hurst Jaws of Life)...anyway, maybe I'm
>>> too critical (wife agrees).
>>>
>>> "The Jaws Of Life!!" <gag>
>>> --
>>>
>>> -Gord.
>>> (use gordon in email)

>>
>>It could have been called
>> - Hurst Snip 'N Spread
>> - hydraulic prier and extrication device (H.Y.P.E.D.)
>> - Hurst opener and spreader (HO spreader)

>
> Well, hell, anyone of those are better than 'the jaws of life'
>
> Can't you just see it?...it's 4 am, a dark dirty wet night on the
> freeway...cop cars, firetruck and ambulance lights flashing all
> over...Fire Chief is a big burly guy who's looking into the
> crumpled up sportscar. Camera pans in for a closeup of his rugged
> tough rain soaked features as he squints from under his big red
> fireman's helmet over his shoulder and sings out "hey jimbobby!
> please bring me a set of those 'jaws of life' will you please"?
>
> Just doesn't cut it...
> --
>
> -Gord.
> (use gordon in email)


LOL! I see your point!
--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
In article <[email protected]>,
Ray O <[email protected]> wrote:

> "Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:131220051908560287%[email protected]
> > In article <[email protected]>,
> > Ray O <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >> "Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >> news:121220052114581583%[email protected]
> >> > Earlier I expressed concerns about whether first responders are trained
> >> > in the risks accompanying the extraction of victims from a wrecked
> >> > hybird. The group's answers pretty well convinced me that they are
> >> > trained and that my uninformed EMT friend here in western NY state was
> >> > an exception to the rule.
> >> >
> >> > But now there's evidence it might be a wider problem than some believe.
> >> > Last week's issue of the Lincoln County (Maine) News has a long article
> >> > about confusion in handling a wrecked Prius. The story is too long to
> >> > reproduce here. Suffice to say that the "experts" the reporter
> >> > consulted in writing the story gave him bad information. I've sent the
> >> > paper the URL of Toyota's online information for first responders. For
> >> > latecomers, that URL is
> >> > http://techinfo.toyota.com/
> >> > Click on the link for EMERGENCY RESPONSE & HYBRID INFORMATION, then on
> >> > the model of your choice.
> >> >
> >> > I'm trying to organize a series of regional meetings for first
> >> > responders where a knowledgeable Toyota rep can disseminate the facts.
> >> > I'd like to see one in each of western NY state's population centers
> >> > with printed invitations sent to firehouses and ambulance crews.
> >> >
> >> > Ray O or other Toyota-savvy contributors: any suggestions on how to
> >> > proceed?
> >> >
> >> > Thanks.
> >> >
> >> > Brent
> >>
> >> Western NY is covered by Toyota's NY regional office in West Caldwell,
> >> NJ.
> >> Maine is covered by the Boston Regional office in Mansfield, MA. Those
> >> offices have a staff that trains dealer personnel as well as field
> >> technical
> >> specialists. They are the most knowledgeable people about hybrid
> >> systems.
> >> The problem is that they already have enough work to keep them busy
> >> full-time and there is no way they would have the time or resources to
> >> conduct training for every fire department in the region.
> >>
> >> I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I
> >> have
> >> seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several
> >> different
> >> fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to the
> >> car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on its
> >> roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip. The
> >> occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped
> >> with
> >> the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled
> >> back.
> >> The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then the
> >> door
> >> is spread open. Whether the car was on its wheels or on its roof, the
> >> rescue team did not disturb the floor pan. Toyota hybrids have the high
> >> voltage wiring has bright yellow sheathing that runs under the floor so
> >> the
> >> chances of them having to possibly cut through the high voltage wiring is
> >> pretty slim.
> >>
> >> I believe that most first responders use equipment and methods approved
> >> by
> >> the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association). The most logical way
> >> to
> >> train first responders is to have the NFPA issue a bulletin or offer a
> >> class.

> >
> > Would the right person from a Toyota store's bodyshop might be a
> > satisfactory instructor about extricating people from a hybrid? In the
> > absence of a specialist, I mean.
> >
> > Brent

>
> Every dealership certified to sell hybrid vehicles must have at least 1
> technician who has taken Toyota's class. The hybrid-certified technician(s)
> at the dealership would be better candidates to pass on info to first
> responders. Body shop techs probably do not have the training to handle
> what a first responder needs to know.


Thank you. You're a great resource.

Brent
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
"Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:141220050629306553%[email protected]
> In article <[email protected]>,
> Ray O <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> "Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:131220051908560287%[email protected]
>> > In article <[email protected]>,
>> > Ray O <[email protected]> wrote:
>> >
>> >> "Brent Secombe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> >> news:121220052114581583%[email protected]
>> >> > Earlier I expressed concerns about whether first responders are
>> >> > trained
>> >> > in the risks accompanying the extraction of victims from a wrecked
>> >> > hybird. The group's answers pretty well convinced me that they are
>> >> > trained and that my uninformed EMT friend here in western NY state
>> >> > was
>> >> > an exception to the rule.
>> >> >
>> >> > But now there's evidence it might be a wider problem than some
>> >> > believe.
>> >> > Last week's issue of the Lincoln County (Maine) News has a long
>> >> > article
>> >> > about confusion in handling a wrecked Prius. The story is too long
>> >> > to
>> >> > reproduce here. Suffice to say that the "experts" the reporter
>> >> > consulted in writing the story gave him bad information. I've sent
>> >> > the
>> >> > paper the URL of Toyota's online information for first responders.
>> >> > For
>> >> > latecomers, that URL is
>> >> > http://techinfo.toyota.com/
>> >> > Click on the link for EMERGENCY RESPONSE & HYBRID INFORMATION, then
>> >> > on
>> >> > the model of your choice.
>> >> >
>> >> > I'm trying to organize a series of regional meetings for first
>> >> > responders where a knowledgeable Toyota rep can disseminate the
>> >> > facts.
>> >> > I'd like to see one in each of western NY state's population centers
>> >> > with printed invitations sent to firehouses and ambulance crews.
>> >> >
>> >> > Ray O or other Toyota-savvy contributors: any suggestions on how to
>> >> > proceed?
>> >> >
>> >> > Thanks.
>> >> >
>> >> > Brent
>> >>
>> >> Western NY is covered by Toyota's NY regional office in West Caldwell,
>> >> NJ.
>> >> Maine is covered by the Boston Regional office in Mansfield, MA.
>> >> Those
>> >> offices have a staff that trains dealer personnel as well as field
>> >> technical
>> >> specialists. They are the most knowledgeable people about hybrid
>> >> systems.
>> >> The problem is that they already have enough work to keep them busy
>> >> full-time and there is no way they would have the time or resources to
>> >> conduct training for every fire department in the region.
>> >>
>> >> I don't know if you have ever seen first responders cut open a car, I
>> >> have
>> >> seen several demonstrations. The demonstrations I saw by several
>> >> different
>> >> fire departments all followed the same methods for gaining access to
>> >> the
>> >> car, whether it was on its roof or on its wheels. If the car was on
>> >> its
>> >> roof, it was stabilized and shored up so that it didn't roll or tip.
>> >> The
>> >> occupant was shielded with a blanket, the A and B pillars were snipped
>> >> with
>> >> the Hurst tool, the C-pillar was notched and then the roof was pulled
>> >> back.
>> >> The jaws in the Hurst tool were changed to a spreader tool and then
>> >> the
>> >> door
>> >> is spread open. Whether the car was on its wheels or on its roof, the
>> >> rescue team did not disturb the floor pan. Toyota hybrids have the
>> >> high
>> >> voltage wiring has bright yellow sheathing that runs under the floor
>> >> so
>> >> the
>> >> chances of them having to possibly cut through the high voltage wiring
>> >> is
>> >> pretty slim.
>> >>
>> >> I believe that most first responders use equipment and methods
>> >> approved
>> >> by
>> >> the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association). The most logical
>> >> way
>> >> to
>> >> train first responders is to have the NFPA issue a bulletin or offer a
>> >> class.
>> >
>> > Would the right person from a Toyota store's bodyshop might be a
>> > satisfactory instructor about extricating people from a hybrid? In the
>> > absence of a specialist, I mean.
>> >
>> > Brent

>>
>> Every dealership certified to sell hybrid vehicles must have at least 1
>> technician who has taken Toyota's class. The hybrid-certified
>> technician(s)
>> at the dealership would be better candidates to pass on info to first
>> responders. Body shop techs probably do not have the training to handle
>> what a first responder needs to know.

>
> Thank you. You're a great resource.
>
> Brent


You're welcome and thanks!
--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply
 
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