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1991 3SFE Toyota Camry
1991 Toyota Camry
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82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all, i was just after a short ram, or cold air intake kit for my 1991 3sfe camry, only prob is i cant find any in aus... tried ebay but only US sellers have them and are reluctent to send to aus :( where can i get them from, i dont really want to diy.. as i dont want to use PVC, or abs ( plus i dont have the tools to bend the pipe(s) ) . live in melbourne, victoria if that helps.. anybody selling any ?? or know where i can get them please let me know. thanks.

regards marty.

contact: [email protected]
 

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幻影
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673 Posts
There really is no need to have a cold air intake kit on your car. The kits on eBay aren't even true CAI's, and the stock intake system works just as well, if not better than the ebay crap. Just cut out the bottom of your air box and you'll be fine.
 

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1991 3SFE Toyota Camry
1991 Toyota Camry
Joined
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82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the tip, but i dont want to alter my air box, incase of cops ( if i fins a cai for it and install it) or any if i sell the car in a few years i could do a quick swap and put the original air box back on.
 

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NYR
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509 Posts
africanmarty said:
thanks for the tip, but i dont want to alter my air box, incase of cops ( if i fins a cai for it and install it) or any if i sell the car in a few years i could do a quick swap and put the original air box back on.
in case of cops?????:kookoo::lol:
 

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Registered
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8 Posts
if you want to bend those PVC pipe, easy way is use a hair dryer move it all around area to be bent and apply firm pressure to bend it how you want it
 

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1991 3SFE Toyota Camry
1991 Toyota Camry
Joined
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82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
clancey-g said:
if you want to bend those PVC pipe, easy way is use a hair dryer move it all around area to be bent and apply firm pressure to bend it how you want it
isnt PVC piping bad for CAI or SRI piping, i think i read that it gives off bad fumes (once really hot) and that it cant handle the temperatures from under the hood. Have you used this method, any pics ?
 

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JUST RE ENGINEER IT
98 Prizum
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2,983 Posts
nothing that you do to the intake of this car is going to help, it is already way too big
 

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NYR
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509 Posts
fredk said:
nothing that you do to the intake of this car is going to help, it is already way too big
that's right!
 

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JUST RE ENGINEER IT
98 Prizum
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2,983 Posts
hey africanmarty, since you dont have a mass air on your car try this, your going to make something us old timers called a velocity stack, it is a piece of pipe that is smaller in diameter than the manifold inlet, the trick is you gotta play around a little to get the length and diameter in tune, it is better off straight but if you have to bend it make it as far away from the inlet as possible and make a bellmouth on the other end, start out with about a foot long and 3/4 the size of the inlet, this should get you feeling what this thing will do, the idea is to get the incoming air going faster than the air in the manifold, it will cram air into the manifold, right off idle should be a big change if you got it sized right, it is designed for cars that pull off from a stop and not a circle track car that runs around wide open, use plastic pipe to get it setup then make one from metal when you get it feeling right, get alot of pipes to start off with, look at some of the old drag cars and you will see a bunch of pipes through the hood, thats what they are:D
 

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NYR
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509 Posts
africanmarty said:
IvanHoe how did you get your camry to get 132kw ???
Sorry for the confusion......"k" meanings thousanths, so when I say 132k, I mean my car has 132 thousand miles(Us American guys do the 'Standard' thing) on the odometer;)
 

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Registered
1986 toyota camry
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119 Posts
fredk said:
hey africanmarty, since you dont have a mass air on your car try this, your going to make something us old timers called a velocity stack, it is a piece of pipe that is smaller in diameter than the manifold inlet, the trick is you gotta play around a little to get the length and diameter in tune, it is better off straight but if you have to bend it make it as far away from the inlet as possible and make a bellmouth on the other end, start out with about a foot long and 3/4 the size of the inlet, this should get you feeling what this thing will do, the idea is to get the incoming air going faster than the air in the manifold, it will cram air into the manifold, right off idle should be a big change if you got it sized right, it is designed for cars that pull off from a stop and not a circle track car that runs around wide open, use plastic pipe to get it setup then make one from metal when you get it feeling right, get alot of pipes to start off with, look at some of the old drag cars and you will see a bunch of pipes through the hood, thats what they are:D
1> Mass air? What's that?
2> When you say ''use a lot of pipes'', do you mean a lot of pipes whose combined cross sectional area is equal to the single test stack?
3> I prefer to have a long engine life, can i rig a device using the stack principle to suck air into the airbox above the filter?
 

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JUST RE ENGINEER IT
98 Prizum
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2,983 Posts
no, it has to be connected to the manifold inlet, i said alot of pipes i meant different sizes to experiment with and the mass air is a big silver thing bolted to the airbox but i dont think you have those there
 

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ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
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368 Posts
"Lots of pipes."

It used to be a common practice on drag strip cars to run a single intake tube from each intake port on a V-8 racing engine, so each cylinder had its own ram-effect tube to pack more air into the engine. This was known as a "ram tube" induction.

"Mass air" is usually a reference to a hot-wire sensor that measures the flow of air entering the engine. Air moving into the engine cools the wire, requiring more current to maintain its temperature as airflow increases, and that current value is proportional to the mass of air entering the engine. The sensor measures the amount of current needed to keep the wire at a fixed temperature differential above ambient and converts that value to an input voltage for the ECM to provide a more accurate measure of air for the fuel-air calculation. This sensor works in conjunction with other sensors to provide all of the information needed by the ECM to provide the best balance of economy, power, and low emissions.

Here is a nice online explanation by Marlan Davis. Electronics guys will notice the reference to current flowing "across" a wire, instead of "through" it, and will realize that it is "voltage" that is measured "across" a device.

http://www.carcraft.com/techarticles/electronic_fuel_injection/
 
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