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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I'm currently shopping for new car and am looking at Honda Accords and Toyota Camrys. I'm currently driving a very old Honda Accord (1987). I was recently researching the Camry and found complaints about dying batteries and possibly other problems with the electrical system. It seemed to be a recurring problem but it's hard to tell how common it really is. Can anyone here give me more insight into whether this is something I should be concerned about. Also, is this something that Toyota may have fixed by this point in the year with a software update or something?

Thank you.
 

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Camry is way prettier and more up-to-date than the Accord. The battery issue seems to be on a few 2020's. I purchased last month a 2018 Hybrid XLE for 22k w/ 25k miles & brand-new tires from a Toyota dealer. The Hybrids has the 6 speed which is a great transmission vs the 8 speed. I would recommend Hybrid which is way better on gas and will also fit into any class of cars because its a Hybrid. I live in Los Angeles and getting 44 MPG.
 

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I purchased a 2020 Nightshade SE edition in February,have only driven it a little over 3000 miles so far but have had absolutely zero problems. The 8 speed automatic works flawlessly and the 40+ mpg on the highway is awesome,comparable to the hybrid without the additional cost. Also no turbos with will keep maintenance costs to a minimum in the future.
 

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I purchased a 2020 Nightshade SE edition in February,have only driven it a little over 3000 miles so far but have had absolutely zero problems. The 8 speed automatic works flawlessly and the 40+ mpg on the highway is awesome,comparable to the hybrid without the additional cost. Also no turbos with will keep maintenance costs to a minimum in the future.
The hybrid gets much better mileage in city driving.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for your replies. I'm happy to hear none of you have had any problems with the battery issue, although it still concerns me that it seems to be a known issue. @Spyshops - in what way do you think that the Camry is more up to date than the Accord? They seem to be pretty on par and get fairly comparable reviews from my research so far.
 

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You'd want a Toyota over a Honda.
Toyota : naturally aspirated 2.5l engine
Honda: 1.5L turbocharged engine.

Honda uses a smaller engine and makes up for power by turbocharging it.
Turbo chargers are expensive to repair, run superhot, and complicate reliability.
The 1.5L engine is consequently under greater strain and pressure over a
naturally aspirated engine.
Honda went this way to meet Obama mandated mpg goals, many of these newer technologies, are not friendly towards reliability. Honda across its line is more aggressive towards implementing complex technology that ekes out more fuel efficiency but that is reliability- challenged.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You'd want a Toyota over a Honda.
Toyota : naturally aspirated 2.5l engine
Honda: 1.5L turbocharged engine.

Honda uses a smaller engine and makes up for power by turbocharging it.
Turbo chargers are expensive to repair, run superhot, and complicate reliability.
The 1.5L engine is consequently under greater strain and pressure over a
naturally aspirated engine.
Honda went this way to meet Obama mandated mpg goals, many of these newer technologies, are not friendly towards reliability. Honda across its line is more aggressive towards implementing complex technology that is more fuel efficient but that is reliability- challenged.
Thanks. That's not something I was really aware of. It seems like it was more a problem with the CRV and the Civic but definitely the Accord has that issue too as it also has the Turbo engine. The customer accounts of their engines suddenly cutting out are very disturbing. Then again, I'm not thrilled with the prospect of the Camry having a battery draining out either. Admittedly not everyone has experienced this issue but clearly this has been a problem for many people. Has anyone ever identified why this is happening or how to not have it happen?

So the solution is... buy a Camry and keep a battery recharger in my trunk?? I'm driving a 23 year old car with 130k miles -- starting to wonder if maybe I should just keep that.
 

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Have owned a 2020 Camry since early July with 1500 miles on it now, and no battery issues. Often don’t drive mine for 2-3 days and starts up just fine every time.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks. That is reassuring. And as much as I don't love the possibility of the battery issue, I definitely am not loving the idea of having my car stop dead on a highway. Anyway, there are other things I like better about the Toyota, like the fact that they've kept the automatic transmission instead of going to the CVT. I also think it's a prettier car and if I can get a 2020, I like the screen location better.
 

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My Camry is a 2017, XLE had sense new. Absolutely 0 problems with 110k on the odo. Test drive both and see what feels better, both hybrid version and gas. The main gripe I've heard on new gen Camrys is the transmission is little wonky. But again compared to your antique you'll be pleased in any choice you make. Good luck and have fun with your shopping. I think you'll have a great car no matter yota, or Honda.
 

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It looks like it’s the Hybrids, XLE, XSE having these battery draining issues. Having more electronics in them over the base trims, they’re more likely to have this problem.
 

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Noticed that a new TSB (T-SB-0095-20) was issued for the battery drain when the ignition is off. It replaced T-SB-0021-20.

Core of the issue is it sounds like the DCM causes the battery to drain.
 

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If you are consdering higher trim levels, I would say the 2.0T Accord may be better, since they a lot easier to find, whereas the V6 Camry is not very common. I still think the V6 Camry is a better car overall, but you do need to invest a lot more time to get it.
 

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If you are consdering higher trim levels, I would say the 2.0T Accord may be better, since they a lot easier to find, whereas the V6 Camry is not very common. I still think the V6 Camry is a better car overall, but you do need to invest a lot more time to get it.
I agree that the Camry is a better car. The Accord is turboed which gives some complexity and extra wear. It is like a band-aid. Also some of the Honda's had a oil dilution problem due to blow by which turbos can do.
 

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I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the number one reason I'm staying away from Honda and going with Toyota (for the first time ever), Toyota has dual injection engines. The oil dilution problem in Hondas is largely due to the motors being direct injection only. This, to me, is a bigger reliability concern than turbochargers.
 

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Thank you for your replies. I'm happy to hear none of you have had any problems with the battery issue, although it still concerns me that it seems to be a known issue. @Spyshops - in what way do you think that the Camry is more up to date than the Accord? They seem to be pretty on par and get fairly comparable reviews from my research so far.
From a non-biased point of view, the Accord is more fun to drive than the Camry...but if you're going to keep it as long as you've kept your 87, the Camry is the better choice because it isn't turbo'd. I think you've already asked the question over there on the Accord forum?

 
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