Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1) What happens if you don't line up the "notch" in the mount with the piston?
2) Do two large (~1/4") ball bearings belong anywhere in the mount?

Spent a good hour fighting the old spring compressor at the shop after I already did both rear struts when it popped out as I was loosening it and sent every part of the front strut flying. I collected the ball bearings for the strut bearing but also found two large balls. Did they belong somewhere or probably feral shop scraps?

I did my best to line up the notch when reassembling but couldn't confirm. If I was able to install it back in the car can I assume the notch is lined up?
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
2,075 Posts
If its the notch who's job is to keep the rod from turning while you apply torque to the center nut, then, yes, that notch alignment to its mating shape in the top mount is important. If it isn't lined up, everything will go together seeming like its ok, but after some miles the inadequately torqued center nut will allow things to start making noise (incredibly annoying if its the rear strut where there's about an hours worth of trim removal work to get to it).

Spring compressor pro tip: use 2 sets of the tools (3 or 4 total), instead of only the 2 provided in the one kit, to much more evenly distribute the compression around the spring perimeter, and get the spring fully compressed so the assembly of the top support and nut are easy to do and not such a "hail mary".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, that helps explain the purpose of the notch. I was using the wall mounted compressor at the hobby shop. I thought it be better but it was in such old shape I think I would've been better off with the standard compressors.
 

·
Premium Member
1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
Joined
·
2,075 Posts
I was just thinking about how awesome those wall mounted (or floor mounted) commercial spring compressors are, but how they can be fiddly too. A local garage let me do my own strut assembly with their floor mounted model, and I found that I had to start over more than once, to get everything lined up properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,550 Posts
I have been using the HF jaw spring compressor. I put the strut on a vice on floor and support the jaw on a 5-gal paint bucket. The spring compression is even and transfer to the new strut is easy. Used it on honda van, avalon, camry, and corolla. So it paid for itself 3x over. Got to do the next sets now on van and avalon.
 

·
イリジウム
Joined
·
13,708 Posts
This (y)

Spring compressor pro tip: use 2 sets of the tools (3 or 4 total), instead of only the 2 provided in the one kit, to much more evenly distribute the compression around the spring perimeter, and get the spring fully compressed so the assembly of the top support and nut are easy to do and not such a "hail mary".
 

·
イリジウム
Joined
·
13,708 Posts
The notched design isn't very good. You can try holding the mount while carefully torquing the rod nut to make sure the rod doesn't shift out. Or do a measurement of the strut rod protrusion height when properly seated in the mount, and then compare afterwards.

Also, if that wall mount compressor is the MST-580a then be careful. I read a post that there were supposedly a lot of older ones (not sure which model exactly) that dealers were getting rid of, because they didn't meet some sort of safety requirement.

MST-580a mechanism of injury animation:

A member got this instruction from Monroe in case of the rattle clunk:




Thank you, that helps explain the purpose of the notch. I was using the wall mounted compressor at the hobby shop. I thought it be better but it was in such old shape I think I would've been better off with the standard compressors.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top