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Question of the Week: Will EV Charging Be As Fast As Pumping Gas?

2397 Views 100 Replies 25 Participants Last post by  goin2drt
EV charging has gotten faster over the years, but it's still nowhere near as fast as filling up with gas. Do you think EV charging will ever be as fast as pumping gas? And if ever that does happen, will it make you switch to EVs?

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Maybe yet that is not what keeps me from the 'switch'.

Its the considerably (2 to 4X) higher Insurance costs.

Any fuel cost savings are more than eaten up by the fat insurance agents.

Not having it and yeah waiting more than 5 minutes is boring and not for me.

If gas gets to $10/gln then maybe we'll talk...
 

· Long-haired Southern-Squidbillie
2004 Camry 2AZ engine; 2018 Camry LE
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i think Tesla supercharging is already within a comparable or reasonable time for long distance trips; for most commuter EV driving there is no need for fast charging--the car is charged overnight at home.

For EVs other than Tesla, this commuter model only works for homeowners, but not those who rent a house or live in an apartment (unless they can get access to an AC mains outlet near the parking space).

None of the other EVs will ever be able to safely charge as fast as T unless it has a robust battery thermal management and control system.
 

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The only way you can get rid of long charge times is to do what many warehouses with electric forklifts do. They have a giant battery bank in the forklift, and when the battery gets low, they have a battery station to swap out the battery. You pull up, a little chain lift hooks to the battery lifts it out, then they set a charged battery in the forklift and you are good to go. Takes less than 5 minutes and you are set for a full shift.

If tesla can eventually design the vehicle so the battery pack can easily and quickly be removed from the vehicle then you could have tesla stations like gas stations, you do not own a battery for your car, you just use Tesla batteries. You pull into the station, they quickly swap out the pack in a few minutes and you are on your way. $50 a swap or whatever they might charge for it. The battery they took out of your car gets put on its own spot on a set of charging stands and is charged up. when it is full it will then be placed in someone else's tesla when they come to drop off a low battery. Of course, you could also use a plug-in station or charge at home as well. But you would have an option for long trips and not have to stop for an extended time to charge up when you need to get things done now.
But none if this is possible or at least reliable until we can get our electrical grid in order, it is a mess as it is now.

 

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EV charging has gotten faster over the years, but it's still nowhere near as fast as filling up with gas. Do you think EV charging will ever be as fast as pumping gas? And if ever that does happen, will it make you switch to EVs?

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that's charging at a fancy charging station with the latest and greatest tech. how about your home $10,000 charging station and electrical costs too?? the young people who voted this are being scammed!! listen to electrical engineers and techs, not the dooshbags who are spazzing about the climate.
 

· Long-haired Southern-Squidbillie
2004 Camry 2AZ engine; 2018 Camry LE
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...
how about your home $10,000 charging station and electrical costs too??
Wow, that is a ridiculous claim, what station are you throwing out there with that price. The average store-bought and contractor installed unit might cost $600. It can be done for less, as for example i bought a charging station, aka the EVSE, for $300 and installed myself, an easy diy project if you can wire up a dryer outlet.

For my 60 mile daily commute it takes about 6 hours at night to charge and costs less than 88 cents. At 30 mpg that trip would cost about $6. Over the past 7 years maintenance expense has been for tires and wiper blades.
 

· Long-haired Southern-Squidbillie
2004 Camry 2AZ engine; 2018 Camry LE
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The newer EVs have bigger battery packs and greater range than those from 2012, such that they don't need to be charged daily and can handle the after-work shopping trips too. Lot more choices and selections available now versus 10 years ago.

The plug-in hybrid EVs (PHEV) have probably the best of both worlds, able to commute on electricity, but able to make long vacation trips on gasoline.

Another option is to buy an EV for commuting and around town, then just rent a nice big internal combustion car for the long trips.

If the power goes out, then the gas stations can't pump fuel either :ROFLMAO:
 

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Wow, that is a ridiculous claim, what station are you throwing out there with that price. The average store-bought and contractor installed unit might cost $600. It can be done for less, as for example i bought a charging station, aka the EVSE, for $300 and installed myself, an easy diy project if you can wire up a dryer outlet.

For my 60 mile daily commute it takes about 6 hours at night to charge and costs less than 88 cents. At 30 mpg that trip would cost about $6. Over the past 7 years maintenance expense has been for tires and wiper blades.
If what you are saying is correct, then where is all the money CA has spent on charging stations, there should be 250,000 or more. The state of CA has spend 10,000,000's of dollars on charging stations, but they may be done in the same way public toilets are done in SF, who knows. The fact of the matter is public charging stations cost a few more dollars than $300.
 

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Toyota has developed a working solid-state battery, they have full sized cars, licensed, running in Japan, now. The Solid-state battery will take a charge in around 5 minutes, not as fast as most tanks of gas can be filled, but fast enough. This old fashion wet battery technology is obsolete, now. Even ford has announced they are changing the wet Li ion batteries they run now with a different battery, not solid-state, and still wet, nonetheless the new ford battery will render the current ford wet bat obsolete, as soon as....
Toyota has announced they will be offering a Hybrid with the new solid-state MY 2025. I'm betting close to, if not more than 100mpg (equiv), the solid-state bats weigh 30% of the heavy, wet hazardous waste containers running around on the streets now. They have very low fire hazard, no liquid hazard, and work, BTW almost all pacemakers utilize SS batteries, they are also very reliable, and take a full charge, 1000's of times. Stay away from those wet Li batteries, the value of those vehicles running wet Li bats will take a nosedive in two or three years, kinda-like the 8-track tape player.
 

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The battery cars produce a bigger carbon foot print than a gas powered car does in a lifetime. so what do we gain?except some get rich off the change. What about the big users like Aircraft plus they dump fuel also. Rail and ships.they only pick out the little guy mainly in the USA. I really want to see the military vehicles on electric.... what a joke......
 

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Maybe a decade or more ago the local paper had an article about the EEEstore electric car. Charge it 5 minutes and drive from Houston to Dallas on that charge, obviously the solution to transportation for all eternity. I saw some people from said paper and asked them how they thought that was possible, since the cable from the power company to your house would have to be able to handle a few thousand amps and would basically turn you house into a crematorium.

I had offered to give them some information about my idea which was capable of 80+ percent wheel to wheel regeneration efficiency and 500k + plus powertrain life expectancy AND it didn't matter what the carry on power source was (fuel tank, battery, wood you scavenge out of the forests, etc.). but of course they were not interested in true innovation. Owned by the same group that owns the Chicago Tribune, hell I even delivered that paper as a young entrepreneur, along with car detailing, grass cutting and oyster harvesting to make some spending money.

Wife still gets that rag. I used it to tape up my car when I spray bomb painted it for $50. otherwise I wouldn't wipe me arse with it. Talk about pollution.
 
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