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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was thinking of changing the front brake pads, and also i have a question regarding my parking brake. It seems kind of loose? I have to pull the lever all the way up to have the car not slide down on a hill. Is there anyway to make it grab tighter and sooner? Like my friends handbrake grabs tight halfway while mine i have to pull the full way? Will replacing the brake shoes help at all? (my thoughts are it shouldnt because the self adjuster adjusts it anyways.)

Just wondering what i should be worried about and any little things i need to do regarding changing the pads?

I've never done a brake pad replacement before. As far as i know, its pretty much just removing the caliper, placing the new pads and pushing the piston back down on the caliper and then putting it back on?

My friend told me something about lubricating the slider? Wheres the slider and what should i lube it with?
 

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The slider is basically just the portion of the caliper that allows for movement (in and out) as the pads wear. A little grease on them is a good thing. A lot of grease on them is a bad thing. Think small.
 

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Here's two good YouTube videos (they change the rotors as well, so you can ignore that if yours are fine):


 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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That looks kinda-like WD-40. You need a lubricant that withstands high temperatures. Just look for one that says Brake Lubricant or Brake Grease on the label, and there are both silicone and non-silicone formulations.
 

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No, I'd go with something like this:

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Permatex-20353-Ultra-Caliper-Nozzle/dp/B000HBM85C[/ame]

or this:

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000HBGKH4[/ame]

Look for something that is not a spray can, but a solid grease in either a tube or a plastic jar, and says:
- won't dissolve rubber
- high temperature (500 Fahrenheit or more)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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Most car parts stores sell similar products to the ones I linked to on Amazon. I'm sure you can find some real brake lubricant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I went to my local parts store and found some permatex brake lubricant. It says its synthetic and its good for all the parts of the brake assemply, including the brake pads, which saves me some extra money from getting seperate anti seize for the brake pads. I also bought some clear tubing to bleed the brakes.

When i went to go change my pads today... I noticed that there were still half the pad remaining...so i didnt bother changing them yet.. (my dad told me that the brakes must be worn out cause the stopping power on the car is weak)

I'm not sure if my braking is weak or if thats just how the breaks are in the car... It does seem kind of weak, like the first inch that i push down on the peddle does not slow down the car much... (should i be worried about this and what can i do about it?)
 

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If the pedal seems soft when you press it down, that either means a leak in the brake lines (unlikely but possible), bad master cylinder (unlikely), or more likely air trapped in the system. Yes, I'd bleed the brakes out to see if you can get any air out. The goal is a stiff brake pedal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
If the pedal seems soft when you press it down, that either means a leak in the brake lines (unlikely but possible), bad master cylinder (unlikely), or more likely air trapped in the system. Yes, I'd bleed the brakes out to see if you can get any air out. The goal is a stiff brake pedal.
The pedal does get stiff when its half way depressed, will this rule out the bad master cylinder and leak in the brake lines? I dont think theres a leak in the lines cause i've never had to top off my brake fluid.

One thing to note is that i tried replacing the rear shoes before (not exactly replacing, but swaping the ones facing rear with the ones facing front, the one facing rear has more material left cause the car is usually going forward when braking) I did a dumb mistake by pumping the brakes without putting the drum back on... so the piston went out too far and brake fluid was leaking through that. I pushed the piston back in and bleed the brakes on that wheel and it seemed to not have any leaks whatsoever.

Plus the car had always had the soft brake pedal problem. (Might have gotten a bit worst after doing the rear, or it could just me my mind playing tricks on me)

Im thinking of changing the brakes anyways, since i should be doing a complete bleed of the system. The pads arent that expensive anyways, so i dont mind replacing them earlier?

Does this sound like a good idea? Should i do the bleed first or change the pads and than bleed?

Also i forgot to mention... that once in a while the brakes are stiff starting from the top... not sure why... but its only maybe once a week where they are stiff at the top and seem to stop alot better.
 

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so the piston went out too far and brake fluid was leaking through that
I hope you mean it leaked out of the bleeder screw. Brake fluid shouldn't leak out of the piston.

One thing to note is that i tried replacing the rear shoes before (not exactly replacing, but swaping the ones facing rear with the ones facing front, the one facing rear has more material left cause the car is usually going forward when braking)
I don't know much about the corolla drum brakes, but many of the drum brake shoes are directional -- one goes on the front and one goes on the rear. If they are indeed different and you replaced them, I'd probably recommend buying new shoes.

I'd go with the easy route first of bleeding the system. You want to bleed back brakes then front brakes.

You shouldn't need to replace the pads unless you are getting a vibration or a squeal upon braking.

If you are bleeding by yourself you need to bleed the fluid through a hose into a reservoir of brake fluid (cup, bottle, etc); otherwise when you release the pedal there is a vacuum on the line and it will suck air back into the system. Not sure if I'm explaining it logically, but when you press down on the brake, fluid escapes through the bleeder screw, and when you release, a small bit gets sucked back in. So you need to pump the brakes a few times, and then the final release of the brake will suck back in fluid if the hose is in a reservoir of brake fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
No brake fluid actually came out of the piston and not the bleeder screw. Without the drum in place, pumping the brake all the way made the pistons go ALL the way out, so the brake fluid starting leaking out of the pistons.... i thought i had to get a new master cylinder cause of that... but when i pushed the piston back in, it was still working fine, so i bled the brake on that end and it seems to work like it was before.

Yes i understand the bleeding process, but if im doing it myself, how will i know when clean brake fluid comes out... and that i can move on to the next brake?

i was thinking of changing the pads anyways cause i was thinking of relubing the whole thing, incase there isnt any or not much lube on it already...
 

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If you're trying to flush out the old brake fluid, you'll probably need to pump the pedal a few times, check and empty out the bleed reservoir, and repeat until fresh fluid is filling into the reservoir. And you have to keep topping up the master reservoir periodically...

Yeah, if you're doing all that work, might as well get new pads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If you're trying to flush out the old brake fluid, you'll probably need to pump the pedal a few times, check and empty out the bleed reservoir, and repeat until fresh fluid is filling into the reservoir. And you have to keep topping up the master reservoir periodically...

Yeah, if you're doing all that work, might as well get new pads.
hmmm emptying out the bleed reservoir will mean i'll have to put in some more new brake fluid in there... i only half 1 and a half bottle of brake fluid left (used half last time) I believe it requires 1.5 to 2 bottles to do a complete bleed. I wont have enough brake fluid to keep emptying the bleed reservoir... I will try to find a helper if i can... if not ill have to buy another bottle...

Oh and i already bought the pads a few weeks back when they were on sale for 50% off, thats why i dont really mind replacing them, cuz they only cost me about $25.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I changed the brake pads. I tried the method showned in the video but it didnt work for some reason. I clamped the hose towards the master cylinder so the fluid wont go back up to the master cylinder when i push the piston down, i opened the bleeder valve, but when i pushed down no brake fluid was coming out. When i gave up that method and went with the other method of just letting the brake fluid go back into the master cylinder, i let go of the clamp on the hose, and the pressured brake fluid shot back up into the master cylinder. hopefully this did not damage the master cylinder, as i was only going with method one cause the guy in the video said that would protect it.

My question with the bleeder screw is that why would the brake fluid not come out of there? I loosend the screw more than half a turn even though it said a quarter turn was enough. Did i turn the wrong thing or something? Is there some other screw to loosen instead of the bleeder screw? I assumed its the bleeder screw itself cause i dont see any other screws.

I tested the brakes, and they are fine, slightly better than before i changed the pads. However, i think if i was able to bleed the brakes it would be even better.
 

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Also consider that improperly adjusted rear brakes can contribute to excessive pedal travel and increased braking effort. Given your e-brake handle travel, it's worth checking into. If the friction material on the shoes is worn, swap them out and adjust the rears, then test the braking effort/response and go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Also consider that improperly adjusted rear brakes can contribute to excessive pedal travel and increased braking effort. Given your e-brake handle travel, it's worth checking into. If the friction material on the shoes is worn, swap them out and adjust the rears, then test the braking effort/response and go from there.

yeah the rears are worn, i will probably order a new set of shoes and replace them before winter hits.
 

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My question with the bleeder screw is that why would the brake fluid not come out of there? I loosend the screw more than half a turn even though it said a quarter turn was enough. Did i turn the wrong thing or something? Is there some other screw to loosen instead of the bleeder screw? I assumed its the bleeder screw itself cause i dont see any other screws.
Your bleeder screw is probably clogged. If you unscrew it all the way, you can pull the whole screw out and check if the hole in the screw is clogged. If so, you need to get a pick tool or paper clip and brake cleaner to clean it up.
 
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