Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts
?

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Re: Information Gleaned from Domestic Content Labels

On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 03:22:01 +0000, Jeff wrote:

>
> "Hachiroku ãƒ?ãƒ?ロク" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 01:58:14 +0000, C. E. White wrote:

> <...>
>
>> And that also explains why a Camry with a "J" VIN had 75% Domestic
>> content (in 2005)

>
> Also, some parts probably came from the US. Toyota actually imports
> catalytic convertors into Japan.
>
> While cats are expensive, that probably doesn't explain the 75% figure,
> though.
>
> Jeff



Well, like CE said, the sticker covers the entire car line, not the car
itself. That's why I was wondering why a Camry with a "J" VIN had the same
content as one made in KY...
 
C

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Re: Information Gleaned from Domestic Content Labels

"Hachiroku ????" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> Well, like CE said, the sticker covers the entire car line, not the
> car
> itself. That's why I was wondering why a Camry with a "J" VIN had
> the same
> content as one made in KY...


Well after looking at the domestic content labels, I have pretty much
written them off as useless at best and at worst deliberately
misleading. IF you actually cared about where the money was going for
the car you are buying, the information presented is not nearly
detailed enough. The Camry is a good example. If you were
nationalistic and wanted to make sure your Camry had the highest
possible US content, the labels don't tell you enough. The labels for
all Camrys list exactly the same domestic content (however they do
list the country of origin for the engine and transmission, and the
final assembly location). With modern computers and inventory control,
it would not be all that hard to print the actual domestic content on
the window sticker for the car you are considering. However, based on
the NHTSA link previously posted, it seems most Americans don't even
know the labels exist, and even fewer actually care. And in some
cases, I think the labels hurt the sale of "domestic" vehicles since
some people apparently would refer their car to be assembled in Japan
by Japanese workers. I guess they like the idea of being an economic
colony of Japan. I guess I am lucky to have at least part of my income
provided by providing raw materials / food. I am sure the Japanese
will need to continue to import soybeans.

Ed
 
B

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Re: Information Gleaned from Domestic Content Labels

C. E. White wrote:
> The labels list the percentage of domestic content for a "Car Line"
> not for the particular car you are looking at

========

Ed, you're absolutely right that content information on the Origins
Sticker refers to the entire car *line*, not the individual car.
I swung by the Toyota dealership early this morning, and noticed
that the Origins Sticker is worded quite differently this year
for the new '07 Camrys.

The new wording leaves room for no ambiguity. Unlike last
year's stickers, the new stickers now include the following phrase
that clears up any confusion:

"Parts Content information for vehicles in this *CARLINE*:
U.S./Canada parts content: 75%

The old stickers mentioned nothing about "Carline."

So Hachi, regarding the J-Vin Camrys, you can be excused for
thinking last year that
:
"the bodies are assembled in the US minus the drive trains, and
then put on one of the Marus and sent back to Japan for
final assembly. The reason? Who knows? Perhaps Toyota has to
manufacture a certain amount of autos in Japan to still be
considered a Japanese auto maker (?). My only other guess
is that they are sending parts to Japan and then assembling them
there."
[END QUOTE]

Until the new Origins Stickers came out with the clear
wording, we were all confused. But Hachi, buddy, you offered the
wildest theories :p
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top