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Discussion Starter #1
It's happening now. Daughter-in-law ran her out of oil, lower end is making a LOT of noise.
Engine is out (4-5 hours, NOT rushing) and all ancilliaries are stripped.
Head comes off tomorrow, and hoping to have bottom end stripped as well.
I have a spare distributor 5SFE, which I'll use the bottom end. The head and front cover look good to use from '99 5SFE. And they'd better, as they ARE different.

Any and all requests for photos will be honored if possible.

Hope is to have this running on Monday, Feb. 3rd.
 

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Various Toyotas
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Let us know how it goes. My DIL and my son brought their '96 Camry 2.2 to me with the oil below the low mark, but still on the tip of the dipstick. Another couple of weeks and they would have been in trouble. She even said she'd top off the oil before bringing the Camry to me. Ha ha ha ha.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, disassembly is all but done. And the bottom end, is DONE. Most of the rod bearings are in the pan. pics below:
291340


Sorry about the fuzz - the small bits in front of the piston are the bearings, slightly reduced due to abuse. This is the worst, number four.
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One and four took the most abuse, with journal number four just obliterated.
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Keep in mind folks, I DROVE this car into the shop. And my Daughter-in-law never mentioned ANY noise (it was LOUD!!).
 

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I recently did a head gasket with the engine in the car. If you already have the engine out it should be much easier. Out of curiosity, did you lift the engine out or drop it down?

I found youtube videos to be very helpful in finding locations and access suggestions. I felt that “ModMINI” provided the best overall procedure(s).
-How to Replace Head Gasket 1997-2001 Toyota Camry 5S-FE Part 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlRkcJuo6EY

-How to Replace Head Gasket 1997-2001 Toyota Camry 5S-FE Part 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZDTxruWT3M

Paul Shpakov provided a good sequence also:
-How to replace the cylinder head gasket on a 96 Toyota Camry 4 cylinder
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZtBcY4ie7c

And, I’m sorry, I am fascinated with Immortan Jon’s technique to remove and install valve keepers and springs with nothing more than a couple of vice grips, a socket, a magnet and some plastic film. He doesn’t show immobilizing the valve with a rag underneath. (Maybe Subarus don’t need this.)
-Remove and Reinstall Valve Spring in Less than 2 Minutes! NO SPECIAL TOOLS
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtO8ev0Q9jc

Keeping track of the fasteners and parts seemed most important to me. I found that those tags with strings attached worked great and a 60 drawer parts cabinet were invaluable.

Finally, I am big on torque wrenches. But, they need to be calibrated. I found that even the digital ones can be off by over 10%. Nthefastlane gave good instructions on:
-Torque Wrench Calibration (The Complete Guide)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GrA5q_eu1k

The Toyota shop manual has all the specs, sequences and torques that you need. Since you have already removed the engine I suspect that you know most or all of this. But, just in case…

Kep
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Please keep in mind that this is not my first rodeo. Did my first head gasket while R.M.Nixon was in office. Have done a couple since then...
Built (ground-up) my first car (T-Bucket) at age 21. Have done a couple since...
I know people who make youtube videos hoping people will follow their, aHEM, advice. Met one once, tried to remove an oil filter with an air hammer. Was looking for a product to seal a hole in an engine block. I don't do youtube.
This engine comes out from top or bottom, easier from top.
It's just an engine, no magic, no secrets, just good engineering and careful assembly.
 

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It's incredible, the abuse these will take before they grenade. Any idea how low the oil was?... Down 3 quarts?... More?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
She had said she put in three quarts a couple days prior. As we know, the sump is 3.8qts...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The oil control rings are firmly stuck in their respective grooves. So, out the exhust it was.
 

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Having rebuilt around 10 or so of these motors over the years(I work on them on the side for cash money), they are literally a piece of cake to do . I'd get rid of the balance shafts and plug the oil feed hole(you'll need to cut off the oil pick up mount from the balance shafts). Assuming the head is salvageable(cams not scored too bad), only mill it. A good ball hone and throw it back together(cross hatch apparent in all I've torn down). Heck, I've even swapped around rods and pistons from parts motors and they've still ran fine with no piston slap or balance issues. All in all, the best motors I've had the pleasure of working on. Bulletproof until the cam/crank/oil pump seals go bad and people run them out of oil That's where I step in...….
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for confirming that the balance shafts can be removed. That was in the plan, though always good to hear from someone who as done this.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Found the spare engine (distributor 5SFE) is good. Ordering parts now.
There are a few differences between early and late 5SFE, or at least the two I have apart right now.
Gear for balance shaft is different pitch.
Oil pickup is larger in early engine.
Block appears the same, front cover is different, for mounting crank position sensor.
And, of course, life interferes.
Last week, I had another heart attack, a mild one, thinners dissolved the clot and I'm back up and around with more meds.
And, today, the Grey One punctured a brake line, so it's waiting it's turn.
Since I've been a long believer in many vehicles, I still have my trusty, ancient Ford truck for getting around. But what's left had better stay together...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Still cleaning and recovering from heart attack, so slowed down a little.
A quick rundown of what happens when the oil get too hot, like as in too little oil in the sump:
The oil control rings will coke up and sieze in their groove. This, in turn, leads to increased oil consumption.
The wrist pins will also sieze, leading to excess piston skirt wear, and, you guessed it, increased oil consumption.
The oil breaks down and provides lessened lubrication, wearing bearings and seals, which puts more metal in circulation, leading to more wear.
The greater clearances in the main and rod bearing then allows more oil on the cylinder walls, which then overwhelms the already seized oil control rings.
Which, yup, leads to even more oil consumption.
The sorta bright spot in all this is that the oiling system directs a lion's share to the head, which, in my case, suffered only a slight coloration from the overheated oil. The bearings and cams show no wear whatsoever. Too, it would seem that the filtration is spot-on, as there was no obvious metal in the oil getting to the head.

Given all this, and the paltry amount of oil in the sump, I am highly recommending retrofitting the oil cooler from any 5SFE that has the cooler. It is a direct replacement, save two hoses will have to be (very) slightly bent differently. About 10º difference each.
 

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Still cleaning and recovering from heart attack, so slowed down a little.
A quick rundown of what happens when the oil get too hot, like as in too little oil in the sump:
The oil control rings will coke up and sieze in their groove. This, in turn, leads to increased oil consumption.
The wrist pins will also sieze, leading to excess piston skirt wear, and, you guessed it, increased oil consumption.
The oil breaks down and provides lessened lubrication, wearing bearings and seals, which puts more metal in circulation, leading to more wear.
The greater clearances in the main and rod bearing then allows more oil on the cylinder walls, which then overwhelms the already seized oil control rings.
Which, yup, leads to even more oil consumption.
The sorta bright spot in all this is that the oiling system directs a lion's share to the head, which, in my case, suffered only a slight coloration from the overheated oil. The bearings and cams show no wear whatsoever. Too, it would seem that the filtration is spot-on, as there was no obvious metal in the oil getting to the head.

Given all this, and the paltry amount of oil in the sump, I am highly recommending retrofitting the oil cooler from any 5SFE that has the cooler. It is a direct replacement, save two hoses will have to be (very) slightly bent differently. About 10º difference each. I was totally following you until your last sentence. Please explain further if you would. Some Camrys have oil coolers? Tell me all about this... I may want to add one to my 99 5SFE. Hope your rebuild is going well. Be careful not to vapor lock yourself doing all this. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Oil coolers were installed on some 5SFEs. Not sure if they were optional. The one I have came on the spare engine I bought, a 1992 model year 5SFE.
Happy junkyard hunting.
 

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You can delete the balance shaft and plug the oil feed to it - the rebuilt engines all have them removed from what I hear. This removes one potential engine weak points, as when the balance shafts go they usually take the engine out with them. MR2 and Celica 5SFE did not come with a balance shaft from the factory. The only catch is, try to find an oil pan and splash shield from non-BS engine, as in BS equipped engines the BS acts as a splash shield and the pan has only part of the baffle. You will also need to either cut off an ear off the discarded BS assembly to act as a spacer for oil pickup tube mount, or get the pickup tube from same non-BS engine where you'll be getting the oil pan and splash shield.

Oil coolers came on automatic Gen3 Camry's, MR2's and Celicas. Gen4 Camry 5SFE never had the oil cooler. You also need the corresponding coolant lines that have the hook-ups for oil cooler.

Good luck with the project, and take care of yourself!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Way ahead of you. Balance shafts already scrapped, oil hole plugged. Oil pickup support will be welded up, and splash shield (windage tray) is in the works.
Thank you for the reminders, always a good thing to have two eyes looking at anything.
Deleting the oil cooler was a backwards move in my opinion, as there never was enough oil in the sump for comfort.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
And the pistons (and whole lower end) I am using are 1992 5SFE. Apparently Toyota changed to low-friction rings for the '97 facelift. An obvious ploy for better gas mileage, but it means I have had to order '92 MY rings. Puts me behind yet some more.
 
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