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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have a 2011 Avalon, I recently got a blinking tire light that goes solid upon startup. Upon further research the likely cause is a bad battery in one of the TPMS sensors. I've received the care from a family member who recently passed, so I don't know much of the history but he did take good care. I'm assuming the vehicle most likely has all the original Denso TMPS sensors.

When doing research I found one prefered method seems to be in getting this Mini VCI J2534 cable and getting ahold of the techstream software. Many of these are being sold on both Ebay and Amazon. In this case you get full control of all modules within the vehicle. You can register new TPMS sensors, clear old sensors, check sensor values etc. Including future situations when you need to make new keys etc. I was curious if anyone has this cable or has any history in using this with their vehicle. The problem I'm seeing is that there's two firmware versions either 1.4.1 or 2.0.4 and that the 2.0.4 is the most stable, but also the most expensive. I've found several youtube videos showing how to remove the sensor via a scissor jack and apiece of wood underneath the vehicle. You just need to get enough of a gap there to pull out the old sensor. Picture below is the cable I'm looking at.

Data storage device Blank media Computer data storage Dvd Font
 

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I'd avoid those but if you absolutely want one get a 2.0.1 and test it fully.
I wasted money and hours on a 1.4.1. Total POS. I then got a VXDIAG VCX NANO WF on sale last year in June from Amazon.com for $72USD, $84 total including export fees and shipping to Canada. Fast and works without hours searching for clues. A 90-degree extension cable was a must for safety reasons since the DLC connector is right above the gas pedal.

Regarding your sensors just get a free scan at a tire shop. Safer to get them out and in than using the hillbilly method, But, if original sensors on a 2011 they lasted a long time. You likely need 4 new sensors.
Mine is a 2013 and lasted till last year. I also needed 4 for my new winter alloy wheels (It's an Avalon. No way was I going to put steel boots on my Lady). Cost me less even including mounting both sets at my friend's garage to get an Autel TS-508WF kit with 8 sensors and 8 each rubber and metal valve stems for less than I could get sensors for. Plus, I have total control over diagnostics and programming with the tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your response,

I did see the VXDIAG VCX NANO cable (without the WF, couldn't find WF). Regardless I found it on ebay for around 70 or so bucks. You had indicated you purchased aftermarket TPMS sensors (Autel). I know and realize you can purchase and use aftermarket sensors (Autel), however do they last as long and are good as the original Denso sensors. I also now understand the spare has a TPMS sensor. I was planning to purchase 5 new Denso sensors (although kinda expensive). I did see the Autel tool early on in my research and I originally thought that tool was the only thing I needed and apparently this tool can "register" TPMS sensor, however, my understanding is Toyota vehicles register TPMS via Techstream only.... Can this Autel tool do TPMS registestartion on Toyota? I did find verbiage that it can "Clone" TPMS sensor, that is if you use the Autel TPMS sensors (you mentioned) and get the serial/code off the old sensor and use the autel tool to push that code onto the new autel sensor. Kinda making the vehicle believe that's the same sensor.
 

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Thanks for your response,

I did see the VXDIAG VCX NANO cable (without the WF, couldn't find WF). Regardless I found it on ebay for around 70 or so bucks. You had indicated you purchased aftermarket TPMS sensors (Autel). I know and realize you can purchase and use aftermarket sensors (Autel), however do they last as long and are good as the original Denso sensors. I also now understand the spare has a TPMS sensor. I was planning to purchase 5 new Denso sensors (although kinda expensive). I did see the Autel tool early on in my research and I originally thought that tool was the only thing I needed and apparently this tool can "register" TPMS sensor, however, my understanding is Toyota vehicles register TPMS via Techstream only.... Can this Autel tool do TPMS registestartion on Toyota? I did find verbiage that it can "Clone" TPMS sensor, that is if you use the Autel TPMS sensors (you mentioned) and get the serial/code off the old sensor and use the autel tool to push that code onto the new autel sensor. Kinda making the vehicle believe that's the same sensor.
I doubt you have one in your spare. Simple to check, IF you have a donut it DOES not have a sensor.

The TS-508 has does everything without the need to use techstream and let me tell you it's the most idiot proof tool I have ever seen. Everything is set that you follow the instructions that are in step.

It can only program Autel blank sensors (That's giving the sensor am identity to make it a sensor for the vehicle in question and add an ID.) And Autel MX sensors are the only fully re-programmable sensors, Can Take a set programmed for an Avalon and even installed change them to be for a newer version even as a HI-LINE sensor (those that display position on newer models).

When doing a relearn procedure (entering new IDs into the ECU on Toyota it even unlocks the ECU from endless loop the TMPS search will cause. You can't enter new sensor IDs with Techstream if ECU is locked searching for a sensor. There's a 2 pin DLC jumper trick to unlock it manually but the TS 508 makes sure it's unlocked. Reason that it does it now automatically is it's so frequent it's unbelievable.

You can clone, manually create ID's or have the tool generate them.
Can program up to 16 sensors at once. All makes of sensors have a battery life between 5-10 years. Usage plays a big part along with temperature.

Can scan any car's sensors. Gets ID, temp, tire pressure and battery status.
Can enter any sensor ID though the DLC connector. (Relearn procedure)
Can diagnose read and clear TPMS DTC codes, also it can read ID's set in the ECU.
Few make/models can only be cloned but they update (free lifetime) regularly as new models are added.

DENSO sensors (pacific) are pretty much all fake clones on E-Bay, Amazon and most third-party sites. They're cheap to make and the Toyota prices are high. Perfect counterfeit item. Rock Auto has no genuine proof since the parts are sold by them and drop shipped in their name from many different sources.

The only way to get real ones is through an honest Toyota dealership and even an online Dealer is expensive.

Makes an awesome tire pressure gauge too. Point, click and repeat all 4 wheels. Longest part it is walking around the car to scan each tire. No need to unscrew cap to check unless air needs to be added or removed. With the tire temperature also displayed sometimes there's a big difference between parked in my garage bay and the actual temp outside. +/-10F is a change of 1PSI, I can compensate for the difference. And a sensor reading is more accurate than a tire pressure gauge,

I could go on and on. Watch some youtube reviews. Some are long as the guy is leaning as he does the review but shows how simple it is. You can scan and diagnose and use whatever brand sensor you want if it's the correct one for your car or use Autel and program or better yet clone them.

It can do everything except install it in the wheel and it needs someone to press the buttons and plug it into the OBD2 port when needed. :)
 

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I doubt you have one in your spare. Simple to check, IF you have a donut it DOES not have a sensor.

The TS-508 has does everything without the need to use techstream and let me tell you it's the most idiot proof tool I have ever seen. Everything is set that you follow the instructions that are in step.

It can only program Autel blank sensors (That's giving the sensor am identity to make it a sensor for the vehicle in question and add an ID.) And Autel MX sensors are the only fully re-programmable sensors, Can Take a set programmed for an Avalon and even installed change them to be for a newer version even as a HI-LINE sensor (those that display position on newer models).

When doing a relearn procedure (entering new IDs into the ECU on Toyota it even unlocks the ECU from endless loop the TMPS search will cause. You can't enter new sensor IDs with Techstream if ECU is locked searching for a sensor. There's a 2 pin DLC jumper trick to unlock it manually but the TS 508 makes sure it's unlocked. Reason that it does it now automatically is it's so frequent it's unbelievable.

You can clone, manually create ID's or have the tool generate them.
Can program up to 16 sensors at once. All makes of sensors have a battery life between 5-10 years. Usage plays a big part along with temperature.

Can scan any car's sensors. Gets ID, temp, tire pressure and battery status.
Can enter any sensor ID though the DLC connector. (Relearn procedure)
Can diagnose read and clear TPMS DTC codes, also it can read ID's set in the ECU.
Few make/models can only be cloned but they update (free lifetime) regularly as new models are added.

DENSO sensors (pacific) are pretty much all fake clones on E-Bay, Amazon and most third-party sites. They're cheap to make and the Toyota prices are high. Perfect counterfeit item. Rock Auto has no genuine proof since the parts are sold by them and drop shipped in their name from many different sources.

The only way to get real ones is through an honest Toyota dealership and even an online Dealer is expensive.

Makes an awesome tire pressure gauge too. Point, click and repeat all 4 wheels. Longest part it is walking around the car to scan each tire. No need to unscrew cap to check unless air needs to be added or removed. With the tire temperature also displayed sometimes there's a big difference between parked in my garage bay and the actual temp outside. +/-10F is a change of 1PSI, I can compensate for the difference. And a sensor reading is more accurate than a tire pressure gauge,

I could go on and on. Watch some youtube reviews. Some are long as the guy is leaning as he does the review but shows how simple it is. You can scan and diagnose and use whatever brand sensor you want if it's the correct one for your car or use Autel and program or better yet clone them.

It can do everything except install it in the wheel and it needs someone to press the buttons and plug it into the OBD2 port when needed. :)
2011 and 2012 have a TPMS sensor in the full size spare wheel and tire. I have a 2011 and replaced all 5 of my sensors last year. Bought my OEM sensors online from a Toyota dealer in Mobile, AL. It's a 1 hour drive for me. They were quite a bit cheaper than my local Toyota dealer.
 

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I purchased this cable to use with a Windows XP VM containing techstream that came from another forum to change some of the settings on my 2011: https://a.co/d/cOUzTxr

I had a TPMS sensor go bad this spring. Using techstream and watching the tire pressure values on line graphs and removing/adding air I was able to determine what wheel has what sensor ID. I purchased a denso sensor from rockauto intending to replace the dead one and reprogram all 5 sensors. The act of draining a large amount of air and refilling just so happens to be the sensor activation sequence to take them out of the “shipping/no battery drain mode” that most people in the Amazon reviews for TPMS sensors seem to miss. Anyhow, this draining and filling procedure fixed my “dead” sensor and I have all 5 working sensors again so far. So, I have not actually reprogrammed sensors with this cable but I assume it would work fine for it as it works fine with techstream otherwise. Lots of aftermarket sensors work by cloning the existing or original sensor rather than reprogramming the car to read a new one.
 
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