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I know a member in the Gen7 w/ smart key got an aftermarket remote starter installed and it works. I wonder if its any different w/ it being a hybrid?
 

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I doubt very much that you can get a generic remote starter to work on the TCH ... "void the warranty on anything related to the starter" might mean a lot of things on the TCH... I would be wary of that statement...
I wouldn't call VIPER starters "generic" but I get what you're saying.

I doubt your toyota dealer service dept. will install an aftermarket accessory. I know mine won't.
Actually the salesman that told me this ended up being completely wrong on SEVERAL other occasions and I doubt i'll ever step foot in that dealership ever again. It's safe to say he was incorrect again.

The Camry Hybrid XLE warms up pretty quickly on its own. I usually have heat after driving about a quarter mile.
With that being said I think I'll skip out on the Remote Starter. I did fall in love with the idea of always climbing into a comfortable cabin. This is going to be my wife's car though so I'll rarely be in it anyway. My Tacoma WILL have a remote starter LOL
She can do with out. :rofl2:

Thanks Everybody for your replies <3
 

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I know a member in the Gen7 w/ smart key got an aftermarket remote starter installed and it works. I wonder if its any different w/ it being a hybrid?
In my opinion, that would be a resounding "yes".

Unless you have something that talks digitally with the engine ECU, I don't think you'll be able to "start" it with just a few 12V wires tapped in to the circuitry under the dash... (at least, that's what I know about remote starters. That technology could have changed since).
 

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I have a 2012 TCH XLE and had the Toyota remote start installed several months ago and mine is absolutely GREAT!!!
 

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I dont see how driving in the winter compared to the summer would be very much different on the MPG's, except the car making the gas engine go "ON" to heat up the cabin. Thats why I believe the easiest/best way to increase gas mileage in the winter is to keep the heater off as much as possible.
 

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In my opinion, that would be a resounding "yes".

Unless you have something that talks digitally with the engine ECU, I don't think you'll be able to "start" it with just a few 12V wires tapped in to the circuitry under the dash... (at least, that's what I know about remote starters. That technology could have changed since).
The basic method should be no different. The same immobiliser and the same signalling is used to start the engine on the typical camry as opposed to the hybrid. Mostly the same modules. I suspect it does it via canbus some how.

The trick is being able to activate the immobiliser to start the engine correctly.
 

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Let us know if you still think this way come February....
+1

Snow on the ground here in Flag. Temps in teens when I get up and go to work...highs in the high 30's. Noticeable drop in mileage as soon as the temps dropped way down. A few more weeks will put us in single digits and below zero. Be interested to see how much further the drop will be. As of now, it has dropped 5-7% so far; however, that is significant since only about 25% of our mileage is in town....and the last tank was probably closer to 10-15% in town mileage.
 

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I dont see how driving in the winter compared to the summer would be very much different on the MPG's, except the car making the gas engine go "ON" to heat up the cabin. Thats why I believe the easiest/best way to increase gas mileage in the winter is to keep the heater off as much as possible.
Click on my Fuelly icon and have a look at the trend graph of my fuel economy. Here in Alberta Canada we have colder winters than Chicago, but I suspect even in Chicago you will not go unscathed in winter. Longer distance per drive will mitigate it, and shorter distances will increase the hit.
 

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let me put it to you all this way...

I dont even consider winter yet! and I have dropped from 850km on my last tank to 690km... that is a lot... my best tanks are in the summer on mid to long rang... all the way up to 950km...

to answer some doughts raised about WHY??? simple the ICE (really great abbreviation!) stays too cold thus it needs to start up too often to warm up... and yes the heating, my wife is almost freezing her ... off tryin to get her MPG higher, her biggest issue is her commute is way too short (less then 20km) thus the engine never warms up enough explaining these results... (Yes I agree; note to self, change wife to new one working downtown...)

Richard VE2DX, Montreal
 

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I'm just starting to fall below 1000km per tank now (max was 1125km)

Consumption's been steadily increasing since the end of October:
In mid-August to mid-October: was getting 5.01 - 5.44 l/100km (avg 5.25)*
Since then, 5.53 - 6.01 l/100km (avg 5.72)*

Unless it's really cold or my wife is with me, I usually don't turn on the heat until I get on the highway (~10km).

The ICE needs to warm up more and it also tries to keep the catalytic converter warm too. My coldest morning so far has been -12C (10F) and I can definitely see differences in the ICE's willingness to go to EV mode. The slightest bit of gas pedal applied restarts it much quicker.

Wonder what will be the hit in January-February when the temps will routinely be below -15C.

*These are calculated from the distance travelled vs liters put in tank and not using the optimistic display in the car (usually 5-8% too optimistic). Too bad this thing can't be calibrated...
 

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Indeed. But it would be a pretty boring (and empty) forum if everyone just contacted their Toyota dealer and/or local shops to answer all their questions! ;-)

Of course if the OP doesn't like the answers he's getting, that's definitely what he should do. It's not like most of us know what we're talking about anyway.
 

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Use the seat heaters to warm you up when you have the heater off or set to a low temperatures. Block the grille (you'll have to check the TCH's diagram and see where the radiators are for the inverter and engine. You don't want them to overheat). For the Prius, my air dam is fully blocked (where the engine radiator is located) but my grille is open (where the inverter radiator is located). It's advised on PriusChat that owners do not block more than 50% of the grille.

My consumption spiked to 6.0L/100km when it hit -20°C overnight and the car was sitting outside plugged in (night shift) and has decreased to 5.5L/100km today with warmer temps (near or slightly above zero daytime highs). It'll tank next week if the forecast for -25°C lows and -15°C highs are true. My commute is short (< 10km) so the engine is just warm enough to shut off with the heater off during the 10km drive at -20°C. It'll shut off with the heater running (and in ECO mode) if it's -10°C or warmer (like it was today).
 

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I'm not a fan of remote starters, but to each there own.

On a cold day, I start the car and slowly take off without heating up and burn gas while idling. I guess this is where my heated seats come into play. 😎

As mentioned earlier, our TCH warms up quick and heat is readily available.

Drive Safe everyone. ❄😊


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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One other significant factor is that the computer has to adjust the fuel/air ratio for emissions and drivability reasons to compensate for the cold intake air. The same occurs on all engines, hybrid or not. My previous car saw about a 15% drop in mileage during the winter, even when the engine was fully warmed up.
 

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If you live in a cold climate and have to park outdoors a remote starter is well worth the money.
And if you live in a hot climate they are worth while for cooling your car as well.
Damn the gas mileage. If we lived back in a cold climate I would install a remote starter in a heart beat.
 

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One other significant factor is that the computer has to adjust the fuel/air ratio for emissions and drivability reasons to compensate for the cold intake air. The same occurs on all engines, hybrid or not. My previous car saw about a 15% drop in mileage during the winter, even when the engine was fully warmed up.
That is exactly the issue. It is too bad Toyota would not design their vehicles better for cold weather climates. I suspect all their design is driven by the EPA tests which do not reflect the real world, especially where it is colder. They could make two significant improvements for us guys in the real cold:

1. Use a warm air intake. Cold air intake is worthless and what is really needed is a modulated warm air intake so the throttle valve would stay further open, and the engine would warm up faster.

2. Automatic shutters in front of the rad. Some Ford vehicles have this and claim it reduces drag on the highway. That may be, but I suspect it is next to insignificant. However, it would help the engine warm up faster and stay warm in cold city weather. Automatic shutters eliminate the risk of forgetting you have manually blocked the front causing the engine to overheat.
 
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