Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1998 toyota sienna (240k) and replaced the rear (very difficult) and front (easy) valve cover and put everything back 6 days ago. I noticed yesterday the I used permatex 81343 (gray) anti-seize instead of my Permatex gray gasket sealant!!! I also remove 4 half moons (2 front and 2 rear) used the anti seize. I had driven it for over 300 miles with NO leaks at all and pretty surprised it is holding up. I posted in siennachat and they recommend monitoring for oil loss because honestly, I hate to redo the rear again. What is your opinion in this situation? Would the anti seize work too or should I redo everything again?
 

·
short-throw dipstick
Joined
·
5,904 Posts
Follow their recommendation, monitor for oil leaks and redo. You WILL get oil leaks from the sharp corners when the antiseize gets dried up, saturated with oil and pushed out.

I recommend Aisin FIPG, any NAPA will be able to source it...it's equivalent to official Toyota/Threebond FIPG. Permatex Black or Ultra Black will work fine as well (so should gray, but black is more oil resistant).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I check my oil level everytime I fill up gas. Should I check it more often now or just keep my normal routine? Do you think the anti-seize will hold up well or do you think it will fail soon? So far the beads formed on the valve cover and the half moons have not changed, dissipated at all. It looks the same as when I put it on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Do you think the anti-seize will hold up well or do you think it will fail soon?
Sorry to say, it cannot "hold up." It is a dispersion of very fine particles of aluminum, copper and graphite in a petroleum grease base. Nothing holds it together except the friction between particles and the thickness of the oil (grease) that the particles are in.

A true sealant is a thick liquid in the tube, but on exposure to air and moisture, the chemicals in it grow bonding molecules. These molecules "reach out" to one another and bond in a tangled, rubbery fabric of plastic that's not dissolved by oil. The bonded molecules of cured plastic material are what makes it hold up, and also act as an adhesive.

Eventually the anti-seize will go into solution with your oil and wash out bit by bit. It's like cake icing (particles in a carrier) being washed by water, as opposed to a fried egg (bonded molecules) being washed by water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Sorry to say, it cannot "hold up." It is a dispersion of very fine particles of aluminum, copper and graphite in a petroleum grease base. Nothing holds it together except the friction between particles and the thickness of the oil (grease) that the particles are in.

A true sealant is a thick liquid in the tube, but on exposure to air and moisture, the chemicals in it grow bonding molecules. These molecules "reach out" to one another and bond in a tangled, rubbery fabric of plastic that's not dissolved by oil. The bonded molecules of cured plastic material are what makes it hold up, and also act as an adhesive.

Eventually the anti-seize will go into solution with your oil and wash out bit by bit. It's like cake icing (particles in a carrier) being washed by water, as opposed to a fried egg (bonded molecules) being washed by water.
Thanks for the explanation. Looks like this will leak someday. I'll keep driving it and watch closely for leaks and in the mean time I'll put a post on my mileage when it starts leaking again. No post means no leaks :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I've been searching on the internet on people you might have done this mistake and found a forum where someone actually uses anti-seize on his valve cover gasket in his motorcycle for reuse. Post #7
https://www.riderforums.com/zr-7-maintenance/39383-cross-referenced-valve-cover-gasket.html


and this but he is concerned about antiseize inside his engine but used anti-seize intentionally
https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=5744

This individual also used it on his valve cover gasket and claims it's doing a great job and contemplating on using it on the oil pan

https://www.northamericanmotoring.com/forums/drivetrain-cooper-s/202693-anybody-use-silver-anti-seize-on-oil-pan-gasket.html
 

·
short-throw dipstick
Joined
·
5,904 Posts
This individual also used it on his valve cover gasket and claims it's doing a great job and contemplating on using it on the oil pan

https://www.northamericanmotoring.com/forums/drivetrain-cooper-s/202693-anybody-use-silver-anti-seize-on-oil-pan-gasket.html
That individual is stupid or a troll. Those Minis will have BMW-style rubber-embossed metal gaskets, antiseize is not doing anything (placebo). They come from the factory with a conformal, Gasgacinch-type coating to deal with imperfections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all your responses. I have received a Private Message from the user at BITOG (Bob is the Oil Guy) forum who used anti-seize on his valve cover gasket back in 2002 and he said he had no issue with it so I will just keep a close for leaks in the valve cover gasket. I have driven it for 500 miles with no leaks.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top