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Discussion Starter #1
While removing/reinstalling the driver side control arm, I noticed the inner CV boot is very torn and was spewing grease while I was doing the R&R. The CV axle does not make any noise while driving, btw. Ordinarily I would just replace the whole CV axle which would come with a new boot, of course. Had some recent pricey expenses which have abated my funds, so I want to be as frugal as possible. Has anyone successfully replaced just the boot on the driver side CV axle? If so, how / what kind?

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イリジウム
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I'd just get a Cardone new axle for $36.79 + tax and shipping with lifetime warranty instead. 2 Beck Arnley boots will run you about $25 + tax and shipping. Not to mention messing with CV grease (or control arm bushings as in your other post ;) ).

If the inner boot is cracked, the outer boot might not be far behind, so doing just the inner using BA 1032973 (for example) at $13.94 might just be false economy.

Personally I like to use OE boots. OE boots formulations have improved over the years over aftermarket, even if OE cost 2x more (~$55 both). I no longer use aftermarket CV boots.

If the factory axle is not clicking or vibrating, then I'd just keep it, and maybe re-boot it in your spare time just for fun.


I'd change out the shaft seal while at it.

 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I had a previous BAD experience with two Cardone new brake calipers. Absolute quality control problems right out of the box. Put a bad taste in my mouth for that brand. I'd be willing to give them a 2nd chance, but if they mess up again, I'm done with Cardone. Even with the TN discount on RA, Amazon is a few cents cheaper for the delivered price, plus it comes a day or two earlier. Interesting that the RA "Economy" section for CV axles is actually more expensive than the "Daily Driver" section. I've only ever once seen that before. I'm almost tempted to see if I can find an OE axle at the junkyard that still has a good boot (EDIT: Junkyard price is $35 plus $5 core). The outer boot looks fine to me.

For the Beck/Arnley inner boot, how do you install it on the axle? It comes with these clamps shown below - Is there a special tool to tighten those bands?

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Sometimes the Rockauto prices sections (economy/daily driver/premium) don't make sense to me too. :D But just make sure it's not reman but new aftermarket. I can tell you OE axles are still the best. That's why I like to re-boot with OE boots at the first sign of hairline cracks. But Cardone new axles do make sense for high mileage cases if you don't want to re-boot the still-good factory axles. So if I don't re-boot, I get new Cardone. Of course, you can try other new aftermarket brands too.

If you only want to try one inner boot for now (~$14+tax and shipping). Sure you can do that. Just be aware that it might need to be pulled for the outer, maybe sooner than you'd like. Whichever way you go, I'd recommend changing the axle oil seal.

The picture of the "double-loop" band above looks like the cheaper, thinner gauge band. Autozone should have all the CV banding tools (Oetiker ear-type, ear-less, double loop band) on their free loaner list except the heavy gauge "single-loop" stainless steel bands. You'd need something like below for what you showed in the picture. Autozone's tool might not have the built-in cutter in the video. Also, they might not have a stand-alone CV band cutter (for old bands) on their loaner list, but ask.

In the picture your current axle has the Oetiker ear-type. For that you can use a screwdriver to pry the crimp open to loosen the clamp.


[Edit:] This is the boot clamp cutter I talked about:
 

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Hello,

Parts and tools:

04438-02180 Boot kit, front drive shaft inboard joint LH 01 ea
04438-01080 Boot kit, front drive shaft outboard joint LH 01 ea
90177-22001 Nut (for front axle shaft LH) 01 ea

OTC 4724 Stinger Ear-Type CV Boot Clamp Plier
OTC 4722 Stinger Heavy-Duty CV Boot Clamp Installer
 

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For reference. You wouldn't need to touch the outer joint of course if just changing the inner boot.

When banding down the boots, the axle should be pulled to a specified length (I don't know what that is for your car) and the boots burped (just lift one end with a flat blade screwdriver while at the specified length). Torque the axle nut to spec off the ground.
 

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Do it yourself and fix the boot! OEM Axles are in fact the best! If it doesn’t have play or any issues, you can save yourself some 300+ bucks for OEM.

I damaged my driver side and used a cheapo 70 buck axle and it already developed play within the first year. I went ahead and got a Toyota one and no problems at all.

The boots are worth it.

If it’s your first time popping these out. Go and rent the slide hammer AND don’t forget the axle puller attachment. Then bang bang, your golden.
Don’t mess up the axle seal too! It happens but try not to.

Edit: You don’t have to remove the axle. But if you want to.


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Discussion Starter #8
For reference. You wouldn't need to touch the outer joint of course if just changing the inner boot.
Thanks. I was watching this video linked below when you posted the video above. I didn't realize that you could remove the snap ring from the bearings and they would just tap off, so it would then be easy to put the boot on. I was thinking you had to get the boot lubed up and force slide/stretch it on over the bearings. That video you posted just amazed me that someone would wear flip-flops and shorts while doing this kind of work, including using a grinder. Although I don't dislike the music, it was too loud and distracting as a background for a repair video, but confirmed the other video showing that this can be done by a DIYer.


Do it yourself and fix the boot! OEM Axles are in fact the best! If it doesn’t have play or any issues, you can save yourself some 300+ bucks for OEM.

If it’s your first time popping these out. Go and rent the slide hammer AND don’t forget the axle puller attachment. Then bang bang, your golden.
Don’t mess up the axle seal too! It happens but try not to.

Edit: You don’t have to remove the axle. But if you want to.
Yes, I actually really don't want to spend the money right now, even if the R/A Cardone axle is quite low in price. I really need to spend as little as possible, so I'm gonna try a B/A boot kit. I'm just replacing the inner boot, not the outer, so the axle needs to come out.


I'd recommend changing the axle oil seal.
Yep, will do.
 

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Of course things never break down when you're budget has some spare change.
It's like breaking down where there no cell service... AAA or CAA premium membership don't help when you can't reach them!

But in all seriousness: CV boot law of physics #1 a crack is equivalent to a termite welcome mat on your house. The crack and grease act like a water and dirt magnet. Strangely the grease spins out but the crap stays there. Make sure everything is really clean and well greased or all that extra work will be for nothing.

Hope all goes well!
 

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LOL yeah I muted that video. I did wonder where the guy was, looks like he was in the Philippines. But right, it kinda show how easily this job can be tackled, but your video is more professional. There are "stretch boots" out there but I've not used them.

On the inner spider joint. You can either disassemble each of the three bearings and clean the needles bearings in them (as I do when changing to CV-2). Or just wipe off the old grease from the entire assembly with a lint free cloth/paper towel. A quick wipe is what I do if the grease is not contaminated and I'm not changing the grease type.

Comments on the outer boot: To replace the outer boot, the inner side is usually removed and the new outer boot is slid over from the inner side. It's also possible to remove the outer joint as in the video I posted, but that's not usually done unless the joint is disassembled for cleaning (as when I do converting to Redline CV-2 grease on the initial rebuild) but possible if you need to tackle that in the future without using another new inner boot.

Petroleum based cleaners supposedly leave a film not compatible with CV greases. So I do the final cleaning with alcohol and allow to dry - unless I do the quick wipe and slap new grease back on, then no cleaner at all. Cleaners and greases don't mix.

As far as CV band goes, you might also get an Oetiker ear-type clone instead of the double-loop. But Autozone should have the ear-type tool too.

Thanks. I was watching this video linked below when you posted the video above. I didn't realize that you could remove the snap ring from the bearings and they would just tap off, so it would then be easy to put the boot on. I was thinking you had to get the boot lubed up and force slide/stretch it on over the bearings. That video you posted just amazed me that someone would wear flip-flops and shorts while doing this kind of work, including using a grinder. Although I don't dislike the music, it was too loud and distracting as a background for a repair video, but confirmed the other video showing that this can be done by a DIYer.

Yes, I actually really don't want to spend the money right now, even if the R/A Cardone axle is quite low in price. I really need to spend as little as possible, so I'm gonna try a B/A boot kit. I'm just replacing the inner boot, not the outer, so the axle needs to come out.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Petroleum based cleaners supposedly leave a film not compatible with CV greases. So I do the final cleaning with alcohol and allow to dry - unless I do the quick wipe and slap new grease back on, then no cleaner at all. Cleaners and greases don't mix.

As far as CV band goes, you might also get an Oetiker ear-type clone instead of the double-loop. But Autozone should have the ear-type tool too.
Good tips, thanks.
 

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If it were me just from my experience as a mechanic I’d just go ahead and replace it of course that’s just my opinion but that’s what I would do just to avoid risking contamination that may have gotten in thru the boot. I have honestly never just replaced the boot on one most of the time the customer wants the whole thing done to avoid further issue. Cardone makes good CV axles from my experience as you mentioned you had a previous not so good experience that is understandable as I have had the same with their brake parts however their other parts are usually good. I had an ECM rebuilt by them and it has worked excellent actually.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'd change out the shaft seal while at it.

Interesting that the RA catalog shows different seals for the left side and right side. I read online that the left side seal is larger than the right side seal. What's confusing is that from what I can see on Toyota parts catalog, there is only this one seal listed. It doesn't specify if it's for left/right side. When I looked the part number up online, a comment said this was only for the right side, not the left. Beck/Arnley only offers a right side seal, which is noteworthy since B/A tends to mimmic the OE line. I suppose I could just get a Timken left side seal. Is SKF any good?

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Looking on Beck Arnley's catalog, I do see Left 052-3522 and Right 052-3523 for the 1.8L.

052-3522

052-3523:

I did find 90311-34026 $10.27 Automatic Transmission Output Shaft Seal, Left, on McGeorge Toyota. This number crossed to 052-3522 on Beck Arnley's site. 90311-34023 $7.76 Automatic Transmission Output Shaft Seal, Right. And this number does cross to 052-3523. On McGeorge's site, these are under "Transmission" -> "Gaskets & Sealing Systems". And the two output shaft seals for automatic transmission are listed. I think the description says the Right seal for automatic is also for the Left seal on the manual??
 

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I know SKF makes good bearings but haven’t had any experience with their seals so I can’t speak on them but I would guess they would be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Check your mounts, rare for a trunion(inner) boot to go bad.

Cheers from Canada!
Mounts were replaced about a year ago. The passenger side (transmission) mount was completely broken. I also just replaced the control arm bushings (the rearward "donut" bushing being comepletely broken as well) so maybe a combination of bad mounts and bushings caused this.

Looking on Beck Arnley's catalog, I do see Left 052-3522 and Right 052-3523 for the 1.8L.

052-3522

052-3523:

I did find 90311-34026 $10.27 Automatic Transmission Output Shaft Seal, Left, on McGeorge Toyota. This number crossed to 052-3522 on Beck Arnley's site. 90311-34023 $7.76 Automatic Transmission Output Shaft Seal, Right. And this number does cross to 052-3523. On McGeorge's site, these are under "Transmission" -> "Gaskets & Sealing Systems". And the two output shaft seals for automatic transmission are listed. I think the description says the Right seal for automatic is also for the Left seal on the manual??
Thanks for finding that. I was thrown off by the different names. I was expecting them to both be called the same thing, just one for left and one for right side. One is called Auto Trans Output Shaft Seal and the other is called Auto Trans Drive Axle Seal. Here's B/A catalog:

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The reason I didn't find it on the Toyota catalog is because the seals are not in the same section as each other, like they are for Rock Auto and probably most parts stores. The left side seal is in the Toyota catalog as "Transmission Case and Oil Pan" and the right side is in the "Front Axle Housing & Differential". Toyota calls the left side seal a "Seal, Oil (For Transaxle Case)" and the right side is "Seal, Oil (For Transaxle Housing)" - not in the same section of the catalog.
 

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Its much cheaper to replace the boot, but I think its easier to replace the whole thing
 

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Its much cheaper to replace the boot, but I think its easier to replace the whole thing
of course but im sure the ball bearings and chanells is very high precision so even small dirt particles can ruin it. probably already its fouled with dirt
 
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