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short-throw dipstick
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Good trick with the heatshrink. I normally use the pliers to get the seal in.

I forgot to post some details on installing the valve stem seals. There are several good references here for doing this job but there were a few details I wasn't sure how I would approach. This isn't a thorough, step-by-step, guide but hopefully it will fill in a few gaps and maybe help you decide if you want, or need, to do the job on your car. Mostly, I know we gear-heads just like looking at photos of someone else's engine problems!
This photo shows a piece of electrical shrink tubing on the right valve stem. Just put a piece of this shrink tubing over a valve stem and go over it quickly with a torch to make it shrink to fit the valve stem. You can use this one piece for each valve. It helps protect the valve seal from damage as you slip it down over the notch for the valve keepers. The deep 10mm socket on the left is the tool folks recommend to seat the valve seal. You should be able to seat the seal by hand but some recommend a few gentle taps with a hammer to make sure it's seated. I'm a little skittish of the hammer since I don't have the experience to know how much force it would take to damage the seal. As far as I can tell, you should be good if you lean on the socket with a rag to protect your hand. You should feel one or two clicks and the seal should be fully seated.
 

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イリジウム
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11,637 Posts
$280 ouch. Most of that is inventory stocking cost for low volume parts.

Too late but for others thinking about it, I wouldn’t use OEM seals (NOK). The Enginetech seals Insight mentioned are $0.39 each. Fel-Pro about a buck each. So as little as about $10 plus shipping takes care of it. I see others mentioned the Aisin timing kit with pump, Aisin is OEM and a partly-owned Toyota subsidiary.

I use the Gantry style made by Schley (91400b). The lock pin has a bb at the end to prevent it from backing out, like on a ratchet.

Similar to what you did, I used one bolt (cam cap bolt) on each end bracket, and a large nut to protect the dowel on the cylinder head - so the cam cap bolt tightened the bracket to the nut onto the cylinder head instead of on the dowel). I didn’t use anything like the flat metal strip nor did I try to remove the dowels.

The exhaust seals can be tight as well but older ones were cooked brittle and became easier to remove. And right, don’t hammer too hard as to drive down the valve guide.
 

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イリジウム
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As Insight mentioned, you need the gantry tool for the rear bank. The Valve master tool looks like it’s meant to be used with a gantry compressor.

the space next to the firewall and the angle of the valves (especially if on stands) make it difficult to exert force, especially the exhausts.

Besides plugging oil drain holes in the cylinder head, consider taping sheets of news paper around the cylinder head in case a keeper pops loose.
Help me out here. I'm following this because at some point I'll be doing this on my 1MZ. I used a Valvemaster Valve Spring Tool on stepsons 2AZFE with the head off, and it is so darn easy to use, as simple as their video shows- Valvemaster Valve Spring Tool It looks like the second one ToyotaJP had linked to is the same tool I used, different maker. I didn't need to use a hammer on the 2AZ to use the tool, but the head was off and sitting on a bench. A firm grip and solid push is all that was needed. I can see the back cylinders presenting a bit of a challenge though. Then again, I've never used a gantry style either.
 

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500,000 + Miles
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406 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
Good notes on getting some competitive prices. I probably paid a premium but I have always assumed I would get a second rate part if I found a cheaper part. That's sometimes true but sounds like JohnGD has some experience with the cheaper alternatives. I would like to have gotten a lot better deal on those seals!

Oh, Insight, the heat shrink tubing worked like a dream but it wasn't my idea. It was recommended in one of the how-to's here in the forums. I REALLY appreciate y'all's input here during this job and in the other posts I reviewed getting ready for the job. Lots of you have spent a lot of time taking photos and posting really helpful how-to guides.

I spent yesterday evening (after mowing and edging the yard) finishing up the valve stem seal installation on the right bank. I had to sit in the engine compartment where the battery was, hang one leg off the fender, and lean off down into the firewall to see and reach the exhaust valves on the right bank. I have a few sore muscles this morning!

Here is the Gantry tool setup for reaching the exhaust valves along the firewall. Notice the lever handle goes UNDER the bar and you have to push the lever handle up to depress the valve springs. It's almost impossible to keep the valve spring depressed with one hand and get the exhaust valve keepers in place with the other hand.
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Here is what helped me get the right bank exhaust vales done, freeing up both hands to get the keepers on. The increased length on the handled helped but it was especially valuable to be able to take my time getting the keepers on while the wrench handle was blocked.
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I tried using some adapters for a hand/hammer push-type spring depressor to help reinstall the keepers but I couldn't get it to work. I should have taken a photo but the point is....why haven't they made a gantry-type depressor but with a different style end on it that would automatically trap the keepers on the valve stem. I know they can do that because that's how some of the hand/push keeper installers work.

I will probably post a few additional photos in a day or two because I will have to remove the oil pan to recover a bolt I dropped down the right bank oil return port. Can't believe I did that but it will be interesting to see what may have accumulated in the pan after 19 years and hundreds of thousands of miles.

Here is a "Kodak-Moment" photo of the lifters
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イリジウム
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They actually do make a tool similar to the Lisle one Insight uses but for the gantry tool. That’s the Valvemaster spring tool Paulbot used (wow, $85 MSRP, expensive stuff), which goes on the gantry tool made by Toyotool.



However, OP's use of an adjustable wrench and wood block is great. I'm always amazed at members' low cost solutions where manufacturers and others charge mega bucks for special service tools. LOL.

In the picture below the Schley handle has a 3/8" square so you can use a break bar on. Then they sell a $47 tool (91400B-LDT, shown on the right end of the gantry) to do what you did with the wrench and wood block.



Notice the 91400B design of how the handle is secured to the gantry. Much easier to deal with and less likely to slip off.

While the 91400B-LDT allows people both hands to put on the valve keeper, I think you'll do fine without it or the Valvemaster type attachment. What I did was:

- Put both keepers in the top spring seat and place them on the spring.

- Use the gantry tool to slowly compress the spring while keeping a finger tip over the keepers, taking care of course the properly secured tool doesn't slip (not a problem with how 91400B handle was secured to the gantry and when kept centered over the valve).

- As long as the depressor tube (or whatever you call it) is centered over the spring, the keepers should drop in place easily and your finger tip essentially does what the Lisle/Valvemaster tools do. (You can first do a quick check without the keepers and see if the upper spring seat can be depressed while centered around the valve stem, then it’ll become obvious to you.)

- If the depressor tube happens to be off center beyond a small amount (because of the limited position settings on the gantry handle), the spring will tilt while being compressed and one of the keepers will tend to slip out while the other keeper fully seats. If so slowly release the pressure while keeping a finger tip over the keepers so one doesn't go flying off. Use a small magnetic pickup tool to remove the keepers, readjust gantry if needed and repeat.

The spring rates on these V6 is not that high and even lower on the 4-cyl, so with care I personally don't think things will slip and bite you, but use your own safe judgement.
 

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500,000 + Miles
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406 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
LOL! I'm partial to the wrench solution since I can always use the wrench for another job :>) Now I have a Gantry tool I hope I won't need again. Never know though.

Thanks for the extra notes on the tools and the finger on the keepers trick. I had quite a bit of trouble centering the tool on the firewall side. It was just a difficult place to work and visibility was minimal. As a biologist, I have used forceps a lot but I spent most of my time chasing keepers around trying to get just the right grip, only to have the keeper slip away and go sneaking off around to the other side of the depresser tube.

I'm ready to put everything back together now but I'm still trying to locate that bolt I dropped down the right bank oil drain port. I dropped the lower oil pan and found out there isn't much access there. I am going to see if I can find a smaller telescoping magnetic pickup tool tomorrow. The oil drain port is pretty small and the magnet I have won't fit. Anyone know what is the chance a one-inch long 10mm allen head bolt will do some damage down in there? I dropped it in the oil drain port next to the right bank exhaust cam gear. I assume there is a chance it could get flipped up by the crank counterweights before it has time to rattle down to the lower oil pan.
 

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500,000 + Miles
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406 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
I managed to fish out the lost bolt with a telescoping magnet tool. I bought two magnet tools since one was longer and the other had a smaller magnet I thought was most likely to reach the bolt through the small oil drain port opening. I tried going in from the top through the port the bolt fell through and wasn't able to find it. I had taken off the oil pan the other day and ultimately fished it out that way.

All good? Welllllll, not really. The magnet insert in one of the tools popped out down there and assumptively is now stuck to....probably one of the rear two crank shaft counter weights. I took a look at what it would take to drop the bigger part of the oil pan and I just decided it wasn't a job I wanted to do. I guess I'll find out if the magnet will get slung off the crank or if it will hang on for the ride and maybe mess up the crank balance. Lots of aluminum parts in there. As far as I know, there are no gears down there for it to get tangled up in.

The oil pan gasket I ordered got delayed by flooding from Tropical Storm Imelda. I think it's a cork gasket but the pan was sealed up at the factory with no gasket, just bolted up with a sealant. Will a cork gasket be more likely to leak oil? I'm going to go back with high-temp sealant unless there is some consensus to favor a gasket.
 

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Will a cork gasket be more likely to leak oil? I'm going to go back with high-temp sealant unless there is some consensus to favor a gasket.
I'd recommend no gasket, just sealant, as mother Toyota recommends.

I once put a cork gasket on my Camry's oil pan (probably FelPro, but I don't remember). A few years later I dropped a bolt down thru the head's oil return ports while doing the head gaskets. Fortunately, it tumbled all the way down to the pan. So I had to remove the pan to retrieve it. When I got the pan off, I found a big HANDFUL of crumbled cork bits laying in the bottom. Never again.
 

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short-throw dipstick
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5,899 Posts
Cork hasn't been the sealing material of choice for many decades for a reason (what BMR said above). A wire brush on a drill will decimate shreds of silicone when it's time to reseal, but cork bits need a lot more elbow grease to take off the pan. Done properly, the RTV seal will outlast the porous, leak-prone cork as well.

I will strongly recommend using Aisin/Threebond/Toyota FIPG and letting it cure for 24 hours; it's superior to the off-the-shelf crap that has trouble curing. Whenever I have to reseal an RTV pan that's been done with Permatex Gray or equivalent, I find that there's a lot of uncured RTV around the bolts (which is also a PitA to clean off). Never have that issue with Toyota FIPG.
 

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500,000 + Miles
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406 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
BMR/Insight, thanks for the input on the cork. Sounds like I wasted $7 but happy to send it back to get the pan sealed up...and without a bunch of cork bits down there. Of course I could be called out for worrying about stray bits of cork down there when I have a free-roaming rare-earth magnet in my engine's dungeon.
 

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short-throw dipstick
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...this is my go-to flexible magnet. Also have the "tiny" version (same P/N but ends in T), which is far less useful (way weaker). Never thought something branded "Snap-On" would be this cheap, didja?

Also have a Tekton, which has a sliding sheath; they didn't intend it to be used the way I use it. That is to say, I slide the sheath out to make a little cup that perfectly holds 10mm and 11mm nuts so I can thread them in when they go somewhere my hands don't like (say, BMW N62 intake manifold nuts).

And finally, I imported one of these: https://www.hazet.de/en/products/workshop-tools-safety-at-work/magnetic-and-flexible-pick-up-tools/1937/magnetic-pick-up-tool?number=en_1976-1

...tough to use because it sticks very very strongly to anything ferrous, but when I need it, nothing else can do the job. Say I drop my 1/2" ratchet down a cramped engine bay.

A good set of flexible magnets is worth their weight in gold. Telescoping magnets are for chumps.

BMR/Insight, thanks for the input on the cork. Sounds like I wasted $7 but happy to send it back to get the pan sealed up...and without a bunch of cork bits down there. Of course I could be called out for worrying about stray bits of cork down there when I have a free-roaming rare-earth magnet in my engine's dungeon.
 

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500,000 + Miles
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406 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
Thanks for posting the recommendations on magnets. I forget the brand I first tried but probably something like your Tekton. It has a round magnet at the end of a flexible line and has a grabber built in that reaches out from the center of the "culvert-shaped" magnet. Turned out that one was too big to fit down the oil drain pout in the head.

I put the oil pan back on with a sealant instead of the cork gasket. I forget the brand but I had some I liked....but wasn't the Toyota brand you recommended. I use the steel wire trick to remove the old sealant, cleaned both surfaces up good with acetone, guided a couple of rows of sealant along the oil pan surface and then mated it up and took a few turns on the bolts to get a good bond but not enough to squish out all the sealant. I let it dry for a couple of days and then snugged up the oil pan bolts on the cured sealant. We will see how that will work.

I noticed the electrical clips on the spark plug coils are pretty brittle and cracking. Several of the retainer clips have snapped off and even some of the white insulator has broken out. I know where to look if I start getting misfires. Pretty amazed the high voltage parts of the coils have hung in there.

Some minor stuff to finish up this evening and hope to be back on the road. This isn't a two-week job,just that I have just done work as I had time in the evenings around other activities.

I have a photo or two to post soon showing how the extra washer on the cam cover helps seal the cam cover better. There are some other images out there but hope mine will help too. I will also plan to give an update when I find out how much this job reduces my oil usage.
 

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500,000 + Miles
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406 Posts
Discussion Starter #33
Here are a few miscellaneous photos as I was finishing up.

First, I wonder why they don't put the oil drain plug at the lowest point in the oil pan? Glad to get this gunk out. It wasn't super thick but I wonder if it ever mixes with the rest of the oil.
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Some bits and pieces of stuff, looked like some sealant from the oil pan or cam covers, on the oil pump screen
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And lastly, a few photos of the cam cover bolts to show the difference with an extra washer.

Bolt with factory washers. Arrow shows the shoulder of the bolt well above the level of the cam cover. The shoulder bottoms out on the head surface and creates a gap for the cam cover gasket. The gap allows some pressure to seat the cam cover gasket but after some years of heat, the cam cover gasket dries and hardens and begins leaking. You can't stop the leak by tightening the cam cover bolts since they are already bottomed out.
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Bolt with an extra washer added
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The photo below shows the bolt installed and shows the shoulder of the bolt just about flush with the cam cover surface.
Now you have to be very careful not to strip out the threads when you tighten the cam cover bolts. This installation applies more pressure to the cam cover gasket and it should seal much better.
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I'm happy to report I finished the job yesterday evening and the engine runs like a sewing machine. I was kind of worried I might have missed a wire harness plug and there is always that fear I might not have gotten something right with the timing belt or the cams. Now to see how much reduction in oil use there is.
 

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500,000 + Miles
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406 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
I am having more trouble now than ever before, reading the oil level on the dipstick. Getting that nasty puddle of gunk (first photo in the 33rd post above) out of the un-drainable part of the oil pan has kept my oil clearer than usual. I have it right at the full line now and will watch to see how much it uses.
 
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