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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was tracking down a vibration problem and found a bent rim. I'd like
to go to a salvage yard to get a replacement, but want to stay OEM.
How can I tell if the rim they give me is OEM Toyota? and for my '99
Avalon? (I've never seen a rim off of my current car, without the
tire).
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I just looked at the reverse side of some alloy rims from an '03
Matrix. There are various marks including the anufacturer's name
(Toyota.) You can compare those markings to make sure you are getting a
matching rim. It seems unlikely to me that you will have a problem with
counterfeit rims. The whole point of aftermarket rims is to have
something that looks distinctively different from the factory rims.

You might also check eBay and Avalon enthusiast boards, if any exist. I
got a set of 4 rims for my Matrix with 50% rubber for under $300.

HTH,
hank
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
"HankB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I just looked at the reverse side of some alloy rims from an '03
> Matrix. There are various marks including the anufacturer's name
> (Toyota.) You can compare those markings to make sure you are getting a
> matching rim. It seems unlikely to me that you will have a problem with
> counterfeit rims. The whole point of aftermarket rims is to have
> something that looks distinctively different from the factory rims.
>
> You might also check eBay and Avalon enthusiast boards, if any exist. I
> got a set of 4 rims for my Matrix with 50% rubber for under $300.
>
> HTH,
> hank
>


If you don't find what you're looking for under "rims" look under "wheels,"
the correct nomenclature. A "rim" is a part of a wheel although uninformed
enthusiasts and automotive writers have incorrectly made "rim" a synonym for
"wheel."

Also look for places that repair aluminum wheels. I've seen the results and
you would be hard-pressed to find where they did the repair.
--
Ray O
correct the return address punctuation to reply
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
try www.wheelcollision.com in Bath PA for repair or exchange. I've seen
copied Yota 4 Runner alloy wheels but none of the other ones copied. Price
new one also at one of the mail order yota dealers (Russell, Iron Toad,
Cornicci) - they discount 20-30%.


<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Was tracking down a vibration problem and found a bent rim. I'd like
> to go to a salvage yard to get a replacement, but want to stay OEM.
> How can I tell if the rim they give me is OEM Toyota? and for my '99
> Avalon? (I've never seen a rim off of my current car, without the
> tire).
>
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all who responded. It's just a standard boring OEM steel
wheel. I got one at a yard for $40, which seemed to be as good or
better a price than I could get online after shipping (a new one was
$95 at the dealer). I didn't see any stamped numbers or "Toyota"
anywhere but the guy said it was from a Camry so would work for a '99
Avalon. He said it was a "Type C" if that helps identify it.

Wolfgang wrote:
> try www.wheelcollision.com in Bath PA for repair or exchange. I've seen
> copied Yota 4 Runner alloy wheels but none of the other ones copied. Price
> new one also at one of the mail order yota dealers (Russell, Iron Toad,
> Cornicci) - they discount 20-30%.
>
>
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Was tracking down a vibration problem and found a bent rim. I'd like
> > to go to a salvage yard to get a replacement, but want to stay OEM.
> > How can I tell if the rim they give me is OEM Toyota? and for my '99
> > Avalon? (I've never seen a rim off of my current car, without the
> > tire).
> >
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
[email protected] wrote:
> I got one at a yard for $40, which seemed to be as good or
> better a price than I could get online after shipping (a new
> one was $95 at the dealer).


My Chrysler has a bad alloy wheel. $373 at the dealer.
I found one at an auto wrecking yard for $60.

> I didn't see any stamped numbers or "Toyota" anywhere but the
> guy said it was from a Camry so would work for a '99
> Avalon. He said it was a "Type C" if that helps identify it.


The tire store was nice to tell me that there's a number
on the back of the wheel that identifies it.


Ray O wrote:
> look for places that repair aluminum wheels. I've seen the
> results and you would be hard-pressed to find where they did
> the repair.


I haven't seen these. I would like to fix the old wheel
and keep it around just in case, if it's cost effective.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
On Fri, 09 Dec 2005 09:11:13 -0800, ll
<[email protected]> wrote:
>[email protected] wrote:


>> I got one at a yard for $40, which seemed to be as good or
>> better a price than I could get online after shipping (a new
>> one was $95 at the dealer).

>
>My Chrysler has a bad alloy wheel. $373 at the dealer.
>I found one at an auto wrecking yard for $60.


Junkyard wheels are okay, but they need to be checked carefully
before reuse. You always have the tire shop put the wheel on the
balancer without a tire and spin it to check that it is not bent in
either direction. And if there are any questions, take the wheel to a
machine shop for a Magnaflux and/or dye test to check for cracks.

Once Aluminum is bent past it's working points, it develops cracks
easily and they will spread as you keep flexing it. Someone could
have whacked that junkyard wheel against a curb in the recent past,
the wheel may look great now but fail after some use.

>> I didn't see any stamped numbers or "Toyota" anywhere but the
>> guy said it was from a Camry so would work for a '99
>> Avalon. He said it was a "Type C" if that helps identify it.

>
>The tire store was nice to tell me that there's a number
>on the back of the wheel that identifies it.


There is an ID string stamped on or cast into the wheel that has the
diameter and width, code letter(s) for the lug type and offset, and a
manufacturer identification - like "14x7 JJ TOYOTA". They might also
have a date code or plant code so they can trace back faulty wheels,
but I haven't looked lately.

If it's the right size and offset, and the right bolt pattern, it
should fit. But sometimes the only way to be sure is to mount the
wheel and make sure it clears the brake drum/rotor/caliper.

>Ray O wrote:
>> look for places that repair aluminum wheels. I've seen the
>> results and you would be hard-pressed to find where they did
>> the repair.

>
>I haven't seen these. I would like to fix the old wheel
>and keep it around just in case, if it's cost effective.


Anyone who repairs aluminum wheels has to REALLY know what they are
doing, because doing good structural welds on aluminum is very
difficult. And wheels use casting or forging grades of aluminum
alloys that are even harder to weld than the usual extrusion or sheet
goods that they use for a bass boat.

This isn't something to taker to your friend with an old Lincoln
AC/DC Tombstone buzzbox and zap it back together. It takes a master
welder with thousands of hours experience, and several grand invested
in TIG welding equipment and supplies.

Then they have to have a big oven to preheat the whole wheel before
welding, and pop it back into the oven for a controlled cooling, or
the differential shrinkage can pop the crack right back open...

And you have to get the alloy of the filler rod right, or the repair
will show after refinishing the wheel, and the wrong filler will fail
again. I know enough about welding to know what I /don't/ know, and
there's no WAY I would attempt that one.

--<< Bruce >>--

--
Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
5737 Kanan Rd. #359, Agoura CA 91301 (818) 889-9545
Spamtrapped address: Remove the python and the invalid, and use a net.
 
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