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My wife's 2000 Toyota Camry has over 185xxx miles. Should I use some SeaFoam fuel additive? The car runs fine, I just imagine there is quite a bit of carbon build up with it being a high mileage car. Thoughts?
Adding Seafoam to the gas is a good way to keep the fuel injectors etc clean. I think they recommend a can per tankful or similar. You can also add it to the oil but be careful. They recommend only adding a few ounces to the oil; something like 1 ounce per quart of oil that it takes. The 2000 Camry takes 3,6 quarts so if you put in 4 oz you should be fine. Seafoam says that you can leave it in your oil indefinitely but most recommendations I've seen say to keep it in only about 200 miles of driving before your oil change which is what I did last time I changed the oil. The reason for being careful with the oil system is that you have to be wary of old oil seals getting affected and leaking.
I realize that others have used it differently and added a lot more of it to both their fuel and oil without a problem but without a way to actually inspect the results on the internal engine parts including the seals and gaskets, we don't have much evidence of any claim made.
 

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Lol. Save your money.

Just sent relative's 340K-mile original injectors out for before-and-after flow testing (with cleaning). Car is '99 5S-FE Camry, when something broke, they had it fixed, otherwise just oil changes and whatever 87-octane was cheapest (Arco, Valero for some reason, and nowadays only Costco). No snake oil, ever. Worst injector was within 2cc of new, which went to 1cc of new after cleaning (I suspect there's a margin of error there). Intake valves looked great because, you know, that's THE NATURE OF PORT-INJECTED ENGINES that wash intake valves continually in fuel.

BTW, SeaFoam is like 95% isopropyl, so maybe just borrow some of that from your medicine cabinet and dump it in the tank, same effect ("effect").

Piston soaks? Unless they're defective or have taken damage from overheating or being run low on oil, these engines don't burn oil due to piston rings. I've done piston soaks before on engines that actually had such problems, but I used stuff that actually does something: aminated cleaners like ACDelco X66P (BTW, every single dealership in the area, whether GM or otherwise, used this for piston soaks). That has somehow gone off the market and been replaced by some BS, but what BMW rebadges for use in decarbonizing their direct-injection engines (direct-injection, which CARBONS UP INTAKE VALVES BECAUSE THE FUEL IS BYPASSING THEM), seems to be the exact same stuff in the exact same measured-pour "Sta-bil-type bottle" but with a BMW label on it. Also, anything that decarbonizes is going to strip lubrication. Which is why the professional products such as X66P warn to remove it from the cylinders and do an oil change to get as much of it out as possible.

You know what actually cleans carbon and oil grime really well? Like, you will see it working well? Purple Power. It's about $7/gal of concentrate at Home Depot or wherever. Take off your throttle body, IAC, EGR valve, EGR tube, whatever, and dump Purple Power diluted 4:1 in. Also do the same thing with SeaFoam. Let's see which one makes you happier.
According to the safety data sheet, Seafoam is less than 25% Isopropanol, NOT 95% as you claim. I don't know how you determined the 95% figure but you really need to pay more attention to the accuracy of the claims you make. The data is as follows:
COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
Chemical name Concentration
Hydrocarbon blend* < 95%
Isopropanol <25%

*Note:The exact composition of the above listed
chemicals are being withheld as a trade secret.
 

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I think to use seafoam in a little tray, unhooking the PCV valve and letting it suck a little bit into the intake is totally fine. I did that once at 100k on my old AVY 1MZ-FE. Tons of smoke everywhere, but probably helps a little with intake manifold carbon buildup. I NEVER have put it into the oil, nor put it directly into the fuel tank. Once a year, I typically run a can of 44K fuel system cleaner by BG products, which you can only buy from a mechanic.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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427 Posts
Also, water works well, to clean an engine (google "steam clean combustion chambers").

Also, iso alcohol can be set up with a vacuum intake, to feed it at a metered rate into the engine, its expansion during combustion cools the charge and can allow high compression (as it was used on WWII fighters), or very advanced timing (as it has been used to "hypermile" high mpg.

Seafoam is a very cleverly marketed product that probably does no harm, and certainly can do some useful things, but it isn't magic. Like WD40, it is becoming a kind of a polarizing icon.
 

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Oh my mistake. Doesn't stop it from being snake oil...norm is correct above that water can be used for decarbonizing.

According to the safety data sheet, Seafoam is less than 25% Isopropanol, NOT 95% as you claim. I don't know how you determined the 95% figure but you really need to pay more attention to the accuracy of the claims you make. The data is as follows:
COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
Chemical name Concentration
Hydrocarbon blend* < 95%
Isopropanol <25%

*Note:The exact composition of the above listed
chemicals are being withheld as a trade secret.
 

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'00 4 Cyl. Auto Camry LE
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828 Posts
Seafoam is good for cleaning small engine carbs, if you soak / let it sit overnight, it does dissolve the gunk out. I've used a can, in combination w/ red-bottle HEET Dry Gas, to clear water out of the fuel tank - the pale oil in Seafoam .. helps keep the fuel pump lubricated. ... Handy when you are on the road and get a tank full of "suspect" fuel, when filling up.
 

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500,000 + Miles
2000 Solara
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432 Posts
Agree with others who say if it's not broke, don't fix it. I buy the cheapest gas I can find, no longer mess with injector cleaner additives, and never have had the injectors out. I do the 100,000 mile spark plug/timing belt changes, air filter at around 30,000 and oil at 5,000 miles. 515,000 miles, no engine issues, and still get around 25MPG which is as good as I ever got. My personal opinion is that if you keep up with the Toyota-recommended service, the biggest thing that affects your engine is how it's driven, i.e., city vs. highway, flatlands/mountains, hard accelerations/grandma driving.
 
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