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1997 Camry LE 5S-FE Automatic Kentucky built
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Discussion Starter #1
I work with polyurethane floor coatings as my job and it just so happens I have access to a 2npart polyurethane mix with a 70-80 'A' shore rating. I was thinking of grabbing junkyard control arms, rear lateral arms (forward and rear) and the strut rods to see if I could self pour the mounts. I saw a newer product that are essentially polyurethane bearings; you get poly bushings for whatever, drill them oversize to accept the bushing bearings and than set the metal sleeve inside the bearings. So it's poly bushing -> bearing -> metal sleeve -> mounting bolt. im told that this resolves the squeeking with poly.

Is there anyone here that has any experience with self pouring poly bushings? I can't seem to find poly bushings for the rear lateral arms besides 1 kit that says the rear lateral arms (adjustable ones) bolt to the cross member via a ball joint type socket. I have to get a better look at those ends as I don't know if they are ball joints.

Any info or advice would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

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01 Avalon XL, 03 Avalon XL
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Following, because it's something I'm contemplating for rear suspension bushings on our old Avalons. Are there still speed shops? They used to fabricate all sorts of stuff and PU bushings were a big part of their world.
 

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1997 Camry LE 5S-FE Automatic Kentucky built
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57 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
They don't have the lateral arm bushings for the rear (non-adjustable) bar; I'm assuming putting poly bushings into that rear arm might be a waste of time and effort. They are saying the forward arms (adjustable lateral arm) joint is a 'analog spherical joint' (which kind of confirms what I was told about there being a ball joint type socket). So far this manufacturer is one of the only ones to have a proper poly kit for that adjustable lateral arm. Thanks for that link!
 

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1997 Camry LE 5S-FE Automatic Kentucky built
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57 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Following, because it's something I'm contemplating for rear suspension bushings on our old Avalons. Are there still speed shops? They used to fabricate all sorts of stuff and PU bushings were a big part of their world.
Honestly I think self pouring those rear bushings would be easy, the worst part would be grabbing parts from junkyard and removing the old rubber bushings. The main thing about poured joints is the metal sleeve not being able to be lubricated and not able to rotate well but those bushing bearings I found would do the trick (I assume you could get a machine shop to make you bearings as well). Plus you can possibly make some sort of a cavity before you pour in order to add a grease fitting (make a wax plug you can melt out after for the hollow and you could probably make grease tracks so it could lubricate all around in there). I am also thinking of adding in P/U to the original motor mounts just for an experiment. This is my daily driver so I don't want to have full blown poly engine mounts but if like to see if old OEM mounts could be salvaged with the caulking gun and P/U inna tube method. From my understanding the black loctite is around a 40 A shore and the clear/white 3m is a 70-80 A shore.
 

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I've done this for motor mounts many times with 80a. They tend to last for 3 or 4 seasons before loosening up around the inner metal sleeve.

I don't see why it wouldn't work for your control arms, but getting everything lined up right would be important. I suggest building a jig that holds everything while it cures. For engine mounts I actually tack weld a bracket on to the motor mount to hold the inner sleeve. Seal off the back side with tape and maybe a little hot glue, then support the whole thing in a bucket of sand as it cures so the bottom doesn't bulge out. Don't forget to deair the liquid.

I wouldn't count on establishing any substantial adhesion between the metal and urethane, on my motor mounts I can tap the urethane out of the metal ring with a hammer when it's time to redo them, so design accordingly.
 
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