Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought my 2015 Camry SE 4 years ago. 1 Year in it had a radiator replacement due to leaking, and now it needs a torque converter replacement due to shuddering that began months ago. Extended warranty has covered the repairs with minimal pay required by the dealership..

Other than that the car drives great. If you were the owner, would you sell off the car after the repair is finished? Warranty expires end of the year.

UPDATE* I received a new transmission from the dealer. Covered by extended warranty.
 

·
Super Moderator
1995 T100 2WD & 1993 MR2
Joined
·
9,134 Posts
If you like the car you might consider a 3rd party extended warranty and just keep it.
Radiators are common issue and not that expensive. Torque converter is kinda surprising with such low miles.
 

·
Registered
2013 Camry LE | | 1997 Camry LE- Selling
Joined
·
87 Posts
Find out if there is a software upgrade for the tranny when they do the repair. I'd also want to know why it shuddered and the chances of it happening again. As sdspeed says, I think it's uncommon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Find out if there is a software upgrade for the tranny when they do the repair. I'd also want to know why it shuddered and the chances of it happening again. As sdspeed says, I think it's uncommon.
Its uncommon? don't the 2012-2014 models have TR problems? Think this carried over?

I doubt the dealership cares - I only say that because they just want to fix it and have me get out. Same with the extended warranty.

I asked them how confident they are that the transmission is not going faulty, they said they would talk to the service head or whatever and get back to me.

I will ask about any software upgrades though.

I am still not sure on whether to give up on the car or sell it. It currently has about $5k left to pay off. It would probably sell for $12-13k or so.

If i decide to keep it, then I run the risk of another big repair happening after the warranty expires...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
None of us know exactly why some Camrys eat up their lock-up clutch and others don't. Seems though that it must have to do with certain driving patterns causing the TC clutch to get worked more, perhaps by passing through certain speed ranges more often, where the clutch slips almost continuously (but which I would hesitate to call "abuse", other than the owner's and Toyota's failure to identify such driving patterns as "severe service" and thus calling for more-frequent fluid replacement).

Somehow, Toyota's pre-launch product testing failed to simulate such driving patterns that would cause the premature failure of the TC friction surfaces. Either that or perhaps some change occurred during the change from prototype manufacturing to production manufacturing, although this seems less likely since a major transmission manufacturer would tend to prevent significant differences like that from occurring.

The fact that this problem persisted as long as it did tells me that Toyota/Aisin was kind of ok with allowing that a certain rate of failure among the hardest-worked TC's was acceptable, at least to the point of not taking swifter actions to stop this problem. Surely some of these TC clutches were going out within the first two years, but which didn't raise much alarm until problems at the "public product image" level arose.

So I am not really surprised that a certain number of the upgraded TC's are now going out, but again which aren't occurring at a high enough rate to cause Toyota/Aisin much concern at this point in time when all car makers are perhaps more focused on their rolling out the next generation of hybrid and electric cars that will dominate the future.

I would recommend that owners of these cars take a harder look at how their (and their car's previous owner's) driving patterns might well be into the range of what Toyota call "severe service", and where more-frequent fluid replacement should be done, perhaps well before even the 60k prescribed interval. For my used-car purchase, I replaced the fluid in my 2015 Camry LE at around 24k simply to flush out the break-in fill, which hopefully kicks any TC clutch problem much further into the future.
 

·
Registered
2013 Camry LE | | 1997 Camry LE- Selling
Joined
·
87 Posts
Its uncommon? don't the 2012-2014 models have TR problems? Think this carried over?
It's hard to know the facts. I've read what seems to be a lot of speculation on the subject. I would be interested in sources for some of the theories that have been put forth. Plus, people are generally used to perfection from Toyota, so when something goes wrong it tends to be blown out of proportion. And this can lead to the FUD Factor. Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. So, if we have qualified Toyota techs here, I would be open to knowing what they've been told and verified by Toyota. And conversely, what is Toyota still hiding, if anything?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
It's hard to know the facts. I've read what seems to be a lot of speculation on the subject. I would be interested in sources for some of the theories that have been put forth. Plus, people are generally used to perfection from Toyota, so when something goes wrong it tends to be blown out of proportion. And this can lead to the FUD Factor. Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. So, if we have qualified Toyota techs here, I would be open to knowing what they've been told and verified by Toyota. And conversely, what is Toyota still hiding, if anything?
I updated the OP. I actually got the transmission replaced entirely by the dealership. The tech/inspector that came out from the warranty to look at the torque converter shudder actually recommended to replace the entire transmission.
 

·
Registered
2013 Camry LE | | 1997 Camry LE- Selling
Joined
·
87 Posts
Super Duper. Was the inspector an employee of the dealership? It's also not a bad idea to throw out that Toyota "Life-time coolant" label and replace the fluid on a schedule. If you tend to drive aggressively, I'd think about changing the fluid every 60K miles or 90K if driven gently.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top