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crazy wheels
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342 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
are skinny tires better for snow? ice?
since they are skinny dont they cut in and get traction?
fat tires ride like a boat over the snow rite? so they get less traction when it snows rite?

just want to know what makes sum cars better than others in the snow and other road conditions

anyone can contribute
thanks
 

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my name isn't really Bob
Solara
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1,887 Posts
yes skinny is better, as there is less surface area for the car's weight to rest on, therefore better traction. For better handling I would assume a more evenly weighted car would be best
 

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The Return of the Red Coupe
2010 RAV4 V6
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19,669 Posts
Watch a WRC Race on TV, and watch how skinny the tires they use on snow are. :eek: they go like 100km/h on the snow too! :smokin:
 

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TN Pussy Man
Camry
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13,302 Posts
well, the whole theory of skinny tires cutting through snow is true- but it really only applies to thicker amounts of snow

I'd personally not go below a stock size width for my snow tires despite this knowledge mostly because though it is true, unless you live in the coutnryside where roads don't get ploughed, you're better off with at least stock-width because then you'd get adequate grip on the pavement- afterall, there isn't always a good amount of snow on the ground
 

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Toyota Fanboy
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4,486 Posts
Skinny tires dont have as much flotation as wider tires, so for snow they are better.
Look at it this way, which would hurt more? Having a woman with high-heel shoes step on your, or one with tennis shoes? High-heels, of course.
Skinnier tires put more force down per square inch (because they are skinnier), so they penetrate the snow better.
 

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5M-GE
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2,901 Posts
Eye8Pussies said:
I'd personally not go below a stock size width for my snow tires despite this knowledge mostly because though it is true, unless you live in the coutnryside where roads don't get ploughed, you're better off with at least stock-width because then you'd get adequate grip on the pavement- afterall, there isn't always a good amount of snow on the ground
Yep. ie, a 1985-1987 Cressida wagon runs 185/70R14. The sedan runs 205/60R15, so it should be safe if you put the 185's on for the winter - and no less than that.
 

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Mitsubishi Diamante Owner
'03 Diamante
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1,743 Posts
www.tirerack.com said:
Does your sports car, coupe, or sedan use wide, low profile tires that are mounted on large diameter wheels? Or does your light truck use large flotation-sized tires? If you're going to drive through lots of snow this year you'll want your winter tires and wheels in sizes that help put the laws of physics on your side.

A wide, low profile or large tire has to "plow" a wide path through snow which causes more resistance. The narrower the tire, the easier you can get through snow
 

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The Return of the Red Coupe
2010 RAV4 V6
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19,669 Posts
For snow, usually you go higher profile and lower width than what you got... so for example.

If you run:

195/60-14 you could go 185/65-14, 175/70-14 or downsize to 185/70-13
185/60-14 you could go 175/65-14 or downsize to 175/70-13

etc..
 

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Registered
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132 Posts
REN69 said:
For snow, usually you go higher profile and lower width than what you got... so for example.

If you run:

195/60-14 you could go 185/65-14, 175/70-14 or downsize to 185/70-13
185/60-14 you could go 175/65-14 or downsize to 175/70-13

etc..
becareful of downsize tho, especially for your calipers sake...

craziest thing I've seen, and I won't mention names or places, but I've seen a licenced mechanic, working for a new car dealer, grind the calipers on a brand new SUV to try and make the wheels, that were too small, fit. After this didn't work...after they got the proper size wheel, instead of using proper caliper paint so the calipers wouldn't rust, he just put anti-sieze on them and sent them out... BEWARE & watch out for stupid mechanics
 

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Toyota Fanboy
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4,486 Posts
sonyminidiscman said:
well, if its usually ice on the road.........i think thicker winter tires would be good
Why? Unless you run studded tires or tire chains it isnt going to matter what tires you run because none of them will have much traction on ice.
 

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304 Posts
Captain_Toyota said:
Why? Unless you run studded tires or tire chains it isnt going to matter what tires you run because none of them will have much traction on ice.

Well, every little bit helps... if each tire has twice the width, then u got 4x that extra friction...

and maybe one of the tires will catch a asphalt patch or something... I don't really know..haha, i am just bored from studying.
 
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