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Hello - I'm not sure what to call this problem, so as to be able to search effectively for a solution. I've tried explaining it to friends but haven't been able to shed light on what it could be.

I have a 2001 Solara, V6, manual transmission. When I am accelerating, unless I am applying a good deal of throttle the car feels like it bounces forward/backward. If I give it throttle it accelerates smoothly.

When I am driving at regular speed, if I take my foot off the gas to let the engine slow the car down, it feels like there's "slack" before the car responds and starts slowing down - there's like a second of no effect, and then it "catches" and starts slowing down. When I do the same thing in my manual Tacoma there is no slsck/slop/pause - the truck just slows down. With the Solara there feels like there's slack between the engine and the tires, and I'm not sure where exactly it is. The car does need new struts, these are on their way and will be put in next week.

Could anyone please tell me what this problem is called, so that I can go forth and research what might be causing it and how to fix it? The car has had a new clutch in the last two years, I don't think it's clutch slippage, but I am far from an expert!

Thank you!

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Sounds like possible motor mounts? How is the 'dog bone' mount? if it keeps excessively wearing out, you got a bad front/rear mount as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sounds like possible motor mounts? How is the 'dog bone' mount? if it keeps excessively wearing out, you got a bad front/rear mount as well.
I looked at a few YouTube videos and that does seem to be a good place to start! I'll have a look at it in daylight to see if it is torn. I've got a Ferret WiFi camera that I can mount inside under the hood and I'll have my buddy drive it while I watch, to see if it moves around.

Thank you! I was fearing that the transmission was wearing out. This is an old car, but new to me. I quite like it and want to get it in its best possible mechanical shape.

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I'd be cleaning the throttle body. That is not a description of a transmission problem, that is a description of a fueling problem.
 

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Here's a link on what to expect on the motor mounts. Given the age, probably worn out. I would also check the throttle body as mention by Cosmofennema. Could be that the throttle body is sticking.

Keep in mind the guide is based off a Gen4 Camry LE V6 automatic. The manual transmission should be fairly similar. Need to cross check part numbers as the part number I provided in the thread are for an automatic model.

 

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Here's a link on what to expect on the motor mounts. Given the age, probably worn out. I would also check the throttle body as mention by Cosmofennema. Could be that the throttle body is sticking.

Keep in mind the guide is based off a Gen4 Camry LE V6 automatic. The manual transmission should be fairly similar. Need to cross check part numbers as the part number I provided in the thread are for an automatic model.

I don't think it's a throttle issue - it's like the RPM of the engine is not directly coupled to the wheels, if that makes sense. I'll definitely be cleaning the throttle body on upcoming Maintenance Week. It seems like the slack might be from the engine moving around like it is not supposed to.

I had a look at the dogbone mount - the rubber looks pretty much like a Copyright symbol, ripped most of the way around and held on by maybe a half inch chunk of rubber. I bet the other mounts are all ripped up too. I have to throw new struts on the car, so I am going to order up all the motor mounts and do them when the strut is out of the car, so I can get at the rear mount, of which I'll just get an OEM assembly from the dealer since it's a pain to get at. Reading through this most excellent forum for others' experience in doing so, and checking Youtube videos on it.

Thank you for the help, it's very much appreciated!
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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changing the rear motor mount, the hardest part is getting the driveshaft out, if it is stuck, particularly if you are in a corrosive environment (if you are not, then it should be a snap)

I found that supporting the engine from above, and then dropping the front subframe out the bottom made it super easy to get at everything under there, engine mounts, power steering pump and belt, sway bar bushings, etc.
 

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Rear mount was shot to hell. Getting the CV axle out was not at all fun. Slide hammer & axle puller didn't do it, you can't get a regular sized punch in there due to the exhaust, and if you use a long punch it munches up the bearing. My inner cv joint is tapered, not square, so there was nothing to pry on.

After I ruined the bearing by hammering on it with the punch, I ended up cutting the bottom of the motor mount away with my angle grinder. Cut an inch wide strip out of the bottom all the way into the bearing surface and the slide hammer cv joint puller finally got it to move. What a dumb design.

The mechanic that worked on the car before me busted off one of the rear mount locating pins in the block. Lined up the new mount as best I could. Fingers crossed..

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Sorry that happened to you, I had exactly the same experience with a badly rusted Gen 3 Camry. Had to cut the mount apart with an angle grinder and replace it (this time, with a generous coating of anti-seize to help for next time).

Earlier generations of Camry had the mid bearing and the rear engine mount as two separate assemblies, I remember them touting the combined design as a weight and cost savings, they probably thought "genius!" when they did it (grumble, grumble). Later, working on a non-rusted one, it came right apart (as intended) and I couldn't believe how simple it was possible for it to be. I think the anti-seize grease is the key.
 

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Anti seize or a consistent oil leak will keep that thing from rusting up ... ask me how I know LOL.
 

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I'll use half the bottle of copper antiseize when my new cv axle arrives! The mount bolts came right out, lots of nice oil leak to lubricate them like you said. I was very grateful to have your motor mount replacement guide as a reference, and the picture of the slide hammer cv joint puller was very helpful too.

My Haynes manual says the torque value for the rear moint's horizontal 17mm bolt is 49 ft-lb, your guide asked if anyone knew the value. Might have been answered further down the thread, I didn't see.

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