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Discussion Starter #1
I just discovered (after sliding down a hill) I don't have snow tires. I'm wondering what everyone's opinion of the pros and cons of chains/socks/tires? I'm guessing in order to put on chains/socks you would need a jack?

I used to have a Volvo flying fotress that took the snow like a champ. I only had a problem once when it was literally nearly 2 feet and no prep or removal. Does the Camry just have issues with snow driving?
 

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2001 Toyota Camry LE Gallery Series J-VIN
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Hello,
I have a set of summer tires and a set of winter tires. I live in Wisconsin so it’s almost a necessity. I got both sets at my local warehouse club and they will switch them out for me for free during the on/off season... I run Nitrogen filled Bridgestone Blizzak WS90s on my Camry and I love them. Unless you live in an area where, by law, you Must chain-up before proceeding on a highway then I would stick to a good set of dedicated snow tires during the winter and run summer or all-season tires during the off season.
 

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Almost a copy of what was just said. Differences?? I have winter tires for my main Camry and Avalon on separate rims, so changeover is a simple jack up and switch procedure. Michelin X-Ice on the Avalon, General Arctics on the Camry. And, yes, I, too, live in Wisconsin.

FWIW, the summer tires are Yoko Avids on both. 100,000 warrantee, super quiet, but suck in the snow. Who cares!?!?
 

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Buy cheap steel rims and good used winter tires from a junkyard tire place.
Have separate set of tires for winter. Best and easiest.
Chains, you have to put them on, can't drive on the on clean tarmac and you have to take them off. Tires - once on, once off.
No opinion on socks.
Btw, studdies are good for basically packed snow and mild ice. So it depends. get stickies otherwise.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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x2 what they all said, if you live in winter country, a set of studless snow tires (or studded if your state will allow them) makes your Camry invincible in snow. And you can drive at all speeds, as opposed to chains or socks which are a lot of work to put on/take off and severely limit speed while on.

As they said, a set of dedicated el-cheap-o rims for the winters makes swapping a snap spring/fall.

With a set of real snow tires on a Camry, the only thing that can stop you is snow deeper than your bumper, or some idiot in summer tires slamming into you (and with your snows you stand a better chance of being able to get out of their way in time).

4WD only makes a car go, but stopping and turning are no better than 2WD. But a set of snows makes you go, turn and stop unbelievably well.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Where I live, you'd only need them like 2 days a year. But I was just considering what to do, because I wanted to travel to snow country for a few days. I asked because I like skiing, but not inside a car. Without me going up north, I'd just not bother as it's no sacrifice staying off the road maybe 5 days a year.

How well do snow tires take 'regular' roads? Do they really wear out? Because living in NYC I can't keep my summer tires. There's just no place to store them.
 

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1993 Camry SE,V6-5MT
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"How well do snow tires take 'regular' roads?" they are just like any other tires, though then brand new their deep tread depth can sometimes make them a little bit more wiggly feeling (the handling's fine, just a slight feeling)

"Do they really wear out?" studless snow tires should not be used when the ambient temp is consistently above 50F, because the soft rubber compound will quickly wear at such warm temps

In my experience, swapping them on/off with the change of seasons, I've never worn out a set before they "aged out" (more than 10 years old), and I drive a lot of miles.

If you have no resource to store tires then dedicated winter tires won't work for you, because you'll ruin them the first summer you left them on. Maybe better to plan to rent a car for your excursions off the island.


Norm
 

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I have had good luck with "all season" tires. I use to ski a lot, and travel in snow country during winter holidays. Never had a problem with all season tires. I have not had dedicated winter tires in years, even when I lived in N. Minnesota.
 

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I've been driving in Montana and Wyoming for 49 years and have always used an all season tire on my cars. They do not have the traction of a true snow tire, but they aren't bad. If I were ever use chains on my car, I believe I would go with the cable type chains.
 
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