Toyota Nation Forum banner

21 - 40 of 129 Posts

·
Registered
2020 Toyota Corolla Sedan SE (6-MT)
Joined
·
189 Posts
I'm not a fan of eventually-problematic, sludge-prone straight GDI or turbo engines when it comes to evaluating vehicles for longer-term reliability & repair costs down the road a bit, or even once the car is simply out of warranty. I personally wouldn't buy a car with that sort of engine in it.

I'm okay with the TNGA DF 2.0L direct+port injection engine in my 2020 Corolla SE sedan 6-MT. Perfect balance of pep & MPG in my opinion. I'm averaging a bit over 40mpg after 5 months of driving her thus far (almost 3000 miles total), & no issues whatsoever getting up to speed as needed for highway merging, passing & whatnot. I guess I am not much of a car performance enthusiast any more. I'm more interested in no repair/mechanical headaches & a reasonable balance in economy vs sportiness vs comfort.
 

·
イリジウム
Joined
·
12,293 Posts
Sure, the German brands aren’t exactly known for long term reliability (VW 1.8t problem), but they’ve come a long way, thanks to Japanese competition in reliability.

then again, nobody makes premium brands like the Germans that people are willing to pay for.

OP should test drive the Golf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
LOL. If you feel the new Corolla is slow, try driving a C-HR. Best 0 to 60 time is 10.5 seconds. Toyota really screwed up with the C-HR where they should have put the engine being used in the current Corolla into it. MPG for the C-HR is no better. Factory numbers are 27 to 31 MPG. The best I've gotten out of my car is just over 33 MPG and that's keeping the speeds in the 45 to 65 MPH range with minimal stop and go and mostly flat terrain. It's sad that the MPG gets affected heavily with heavy wind, going uphill and on highways where the posted speed limit is 70MPH.

Had Toyota designed the Corolla HB with a better trunk, I would have bought the Corolla HB over the C-HR because when I went to the dealership the Corolla HB was what I was initially going to buy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,082 Posts
When will Gm make a reliable car that has some resale value?

Toyota should consider the Camry 2.5/8 speed auto or maybe the 2.5 with a 6-speed manual transmission as an option for the Corolla for those that want a little more pep. Turbo/GDI has been a nightmare across most makes. I bet when Toyota adapts that formula, it will be a lot better than the German, Domestic, or other Asian DI/turbo abominations.

How well does Toyota Corolla sell when compared to VW or Chevy? VW marketing is a lost cause as is GM's UAW workforce.
 

·
Registered
2020 Toyota Corolla Sedan SE (6-MT)
Joined
·
189 Posts
It's no secret that Japan, Europe & most other markets get much better options when it comes to their Toyota subcompact & compact vehicle selections. The U.S. auto market is just dull & soulless by comparison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
514 Posts
It's no secret that Japan, Europe & most other markets get much better options when it comes to their Toyota subcompact & compact vehicle selections. The U.S. auto market is just dull & soulless by comparison.
"proverty-spec" is the term I regular use in this forum - if they literally bring a JDM spec Corolla Sport into US, no one will buy the Lexus UX; the US is a hideous looking CUV IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
It's no secret that Japan, Europe & most other markets get much better options when it comes to their Toyota subcompact & compact vehicle selections. The U.S. auto market is just dull & soulless by comparison.
This is usually true. However, the USDM Corolla HB is one of the better versions globally. The lowest model you can get has a much more powerful engine, standard alloy wheels and LED lighting that lower level Corolla HB globally don't have. Saw a Corolla HB in China recently, looked like 15" hubcaps and non-LED halogen headlights. It looked very "poverty spec" to my eyes.
 

·
straight cash homie
Joined
·
20,366 Posts
I'm not a fan of eventually-problematic, sludge-prone straight GDI or turbo engines when it comes to evaluating vehicles for longer-term reliability & repair costs down the road a bit, or even once the car is simply out of warranty. I personally wouldn't buy a car with that sort of engine in it.

I'm okay with the TNGA DF 2.0L direct+port injection engine in my 2020 Corolla SE sedan 6-MT. Perfect balance of pep & MPG in my opinion. I'm averaging a bit over 40mpg after 5 months of driving her thus far (almost 3000 miles total), & no issues whatsoever getting up to speed as needed for highway merging, passing & whatnot. I guess I am not much of a car performance enthusiast any more. I'm more interested in no repair/mechanical headaches & a reasonable balance in economy vs sportiness vs comfort.
That's fine, you got the NA version you wanted that will go trouble free, but Toyota could still offer true enthusiast model and they are missing the boat IMO when they could very well make an Si competitor at least.

The LX grade of the Civic is a NA motor, while the other models, the more fun to drive ones are turbo.
 

·
Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
·
21,703 Posts
It's sad that the MPG gets affected heavily with heavy wind, going uphill and on highways where the posted speed limit is 70MPH.
It's called physics. ;) Any vehicle will be negatively affected when driving into a headwind, going uphill or driving faster. In the same conditions you will always get better MPG going 55-60mph vs 65-70 vs 75-80.
 

·
Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
·
21,703 Posts
When will Gm make a reliable car that has some resale value?

Toyota should consider the Camry 2.5/8 speed auto or maybe the 2.5 with a 6-speed manual transmission as an option for the Corolla for those that want a little more pep. Turbo/GDI has been a nightmare across most makes. I bet when Toyota adapts that formula, it will be a lot better than the German, Domestic, or other Asian DI/turbo abominations.

How well does Toyota Corolla sell when compared to VW or Chevy? VW marketing is a lost cause as is GM's UAW workforce.
I think that the Corolla with the 2.5L from the Camry would be a great option. The Camry is rated at 28 city/ 39 highway with the 8AT so the Corolla should get even better MPG being lighter. With a 6MT offered that would be a very fun car that still provides excellent MPG.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lukey

·
Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
·
21,703 Posts
That's fine, you got the NA version you wanted that will go trouble free, but Toyota could still offer true enthusiast model and they are missing the boat IMO when they could very well make an Si competitor at least.

The LX grade of the Civic is a NA motor, while the other models, the more fun to drive ones are turbo.
I totally agree. I don't want Toyota to get rid of the 2.0L NA motor option, just add a more potent turbo engine for those of us that want it. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
It's called physics. ;) Any vehicle will be negatively affected when driving into a headwind, going uphill or driving faster. In the same conditions you will always get better MPG going 55-60mph vs 65-70 vs 75-80.
The underpowered engine exacerbates the problem. If you've driven a C-HR under these conditions you'd understand why I bring this up. The fact you have to floor the accelerator to even maintain speed is just a travesty. I've driven many econoboxes in the past. So I know what's reasonable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
The underpowered engine exacerbates the problem. If you've driven a C-HR under these conditions you'd understand why I bring this up. The fact you have to floor the accelerator to even maintain speed is just a travesty. I've driven many econoboxes in the past. So I know what's reasonable.
When we were at the dealer, my wife, on her own, saw a C-HR and was like "oooohhh, I liiiike THAT! I wanna take a closer look" I was like "nope, no way, look at it all you want but there is no way I'd buy such a large vehicle with such a lethargic engine". Also, the outward visibility is terrible. In fact, I think the C-HR would be "cool" if it had the 2.5L in it. I do like how it looks, but the engine and poor outward visibility are a big "NO" from me.

I'll admit the hatch area in our new Corolla is a touch too small, but the 2.0 and better outward visibility are worth it to us. You can always drop a back seat in the Corolla HB, you can't get any better visibility or engine power from the C-HR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
When we were at the dealer, my wife, on her own, saw a C-HR and was like "oooohhh, I liiiike THAT! I wanna take a closer look" I was like "nope, no way, look at it all you want but there is no way I'd buy such a large vehicle with such a lethargic engine". Also, the outward visibility is terrible. In fact, I think the C-HR would be "cool" if it had the 2.5L in it. I do like how it looks, but the engine and poor outward visibility are a big "NO" from me.

I'll admit the hatch area in our new Corolla is a touch too small, but the 2.0 and better outward visibility are worth it to us. You can always drop a back seat in the Corolla HB, you can't get any better visibility or engine power from the C-HR.
There was a couple who stopped me at a shopping mall parking lot. They were interested in the C-HR and asked me what I thought. I had to be honest and ended up talking them out of buying it.

The visibility isn't a big deal for me. I've been driving mine for a year now. I do think the blind spot monitoring should be standard instead of only available with the XLE and Limited with the power folding mirrors. Mine is an LE so I don't have the blind spot monitoring or even an option to have it added as an individual option.

As far as the trunk, it's way smaller than the C-HR despite what Toyota puts out there as official capacity numbers. I've compared the two side by side and you'll see the difference jump out at you. For my situation, the trunk space was a big factor in why I went with the C-HR despite all the short comings. I don't have the option to drop the rear seats when I have my daughter with me who is still using a car seat. I don't want to be put into a situation where I have to choose whether I take my daughter and not haul anything of a decent size or haul something in the trunk and not take my daughter. If I bought the Corolla HB, it really wouldn't be any different than my other car being a BMW 135i.

It's such a shame. The C-HR has a lot of potential yet Toyota chooses to keep this car a half done car. Handling is great on it. I've railed it around corners pretty hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
I once had a ride in a Nissan Juke. It was surprisingly spunky, and that matched it's "unique" style. Honestly, the C-HR does look like it could be "quick". Such a let down.

My wife is going from an Impreza to the Corolla HB. We are losing an entire "row" worth of space for shopping bags.
She went to Costco the other day and immediately noticed the lack of space. But, on the other hand, she really prefers small cars and the Corolla is significantly shorter than her Impreza and she really appreciates that. We have other cars to drive if the Corolla ever becomes "too small" for a certain task.

Speaking of Impreza, I actually put a dishwasher in it one time, with the hatch closed (seats folded down) it was a pretty versatile vehicle.
 

·
Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
·
21,703 Posts
There was a couple who stopped me at a shopping mall parking lot. They were interested in the C-HR and asked me what I thought. I had to be honest and ended up talking them out of buying it.

The visibility isn't a big deal for me. I've been driving mine for a year now. I do think the blind spot monitoring should be standard instead of only available with the XLE and Limited with the power folding mirrors. Mine is an LE so I don't have the blind spot monitoring or even an option to have it added as an individual option.

As far as the trunk, it's way smaller than the C-HR despite what Toyota puts out there as official capacity numbers. I've compared the two side by side and you'll see the difference jump out at you. For my situation, the trunk space was a big factor in why I went with the C-HR despite all the short comings. I don't have the option to drop the rear seats when I have my daughter with me who is still using a car seat. I don't want to be put into a situation where I have to choose whether I take my daughter and not haul anything of a decent size or haul something in the trunk and not take my daughter. If I bought the Corolla HB, it really wouldn't be any different than my other car being a BMW 135i.

It's such a shame. The C-HR has a lot of potential yet Toyota chooses to keep this car a half done car. Handling is great on it. I've railed it around corners pretty hard.
You never know if you talked them out of it or not! ;) You never know what they may take themselves into. When I first saw it I liked the way it looked. Then I found out the engine and transmission that it came with, what a let down. I had a hard time even getting in and out of it. The blind spot monitoring is no big deal. If you adjust your side mirrors properly you won't have blind spots.

 

·
Registered
'19 Corolla HB
Joined
·
63 Posts
I think the C-HR had a lot of potential. It's good looking (to me as a millennial), has great standard features, and a decently sized trunk; everything I was looking for... except for that engine and transmission. If they had put the new 2.0L engine and CVT in the C-HR, I would have bought it no questions asked but they didn't. And I understand why they skimped out on the engine: because it would eat into UX200 sales. If I'm not mistaken, the UX200 is basically the same car as the C-HR with the Rolla HB engine. It's a total shame because the C-HR was supposed to be the car that got young people into new Toyotas.
 

·
Registered
2016 Toyota 4Runner,
Joined
·
205 Posts
You never know if you talked them out of it or not! ;) You never know what they may take themselves into. When I first saw it I liked the way it looked. Then I found out the engine and transmission that it came with, what a let down. I had a hard time even getting in and out of it. The blind spot monitoring is no big deal. If you adjust your side mirrors properly you won't have blind spots.

Yup, proper mirror adjustment takes care of almost all blind spots.

Cross traffic alert, which the Corolla doesn’t have for some reason, can be a lifesaver when backing out of a spot flanked by SUVs or trucks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
You never know if you talked them out of it or not! ;) You never know what they may take themselves into. When I first saw it I liked the way it looked. Then I found out the engine and transmission that it came with, what a let down. I had a hard time even getting in and out of it. The blind spot monitoring is no big deal. If you adjust your side mirrors properly you won't have blind spots.

I did talk them out of it. Because the funny thing is I ran into them later that day at another store. We ended up talking some more about the C-HR and other options they were thinking about. We even exchanged phone numbers. So yes, Toyota lost a sale on the C-HR because they refuse to properly finish the car.

Getting in and out of the car is no big deal for me. Just that the passenger seat behind me is going to be limited due to my 6'5" frame. It's way better than my 135i. There's no way anyone could sit behind me in that car unless they had no legs. With the current setup of the C-HR, I at least have gained decent trunk space and the ability to take 2.5 passengers with me along with my daughter in her car seat. Before in my 135i, I couldn't take anyone at all if my daughter was in that car in her car seat. As I said above, no one could sit behind me. And the front passenger seat is very limited on who could take with my daughter in the car seat. I could maybe take a kid. But no way could I take an adult as the seat had to moved forward to allow for space for my daughter.

I say the blind spot monitoring is needed because well...we are talking about the typical US driver. As I said, I've been driving the car for a year now and haven't had much of an issue with the blind spots on the car. The only thing I wish Toyota would have done is having the auto tilt down of the exterior mirrors that are in other cars now a days. I use this feature all the time to get my cars as close as possible to the curbing at end spots in the parking lot. Yes, I'm one of those people that park at end spots and park as close as possible to the edge to avoid door dings. I've been so far successful with this as my BMW is about 7 years old now with not even one slight ding to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I think the C-HR had a lot of potential. It's good looking (to me as a millennial), has great standard features, and a decently sized trunk; everything I was looking for... except for that engine and transmission. If they had put the new 2.0L engine and CVT in the C-HR, I would have bought it no questions asked but they didn't. And I understand why they skimped out on the engine: because it would eat into UX200 sales. If I'm not mistaken, the UX200 is basically the same car as the C-HR with the Rolla HB engine. It's a total shame because the C-HR was supposed to be the car that got young people into new Toyotas.
Yes, the UX200 is the same platform as the C-HR. The fear of having the new 2.0L engine put into the C-HR is a cop out by Toyota. The reason I say this is because they poured 50 million euros in doing an engine redesign and refresh of the overseas version. The overseas market has a new 180HP hybrid powerplant. Not only that. The overseas market has AWD as an option and other features such as park distance sensors which are unavailable here in the states. Oh and a manual trans is an option on the 1.2L turbo powerplant.

As I said, I'm really impressed with the handling of the C-HR. All the press about it being tuned on the Nurburgring, I can believe. I guess the suspension has to be really good as if you're trying to keep pace with traffic on twisties you'll have to carry more entry speed into a corner with the anemic power plant.
 
21 - 40 of 129 Posts
Top