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99 Avalon
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We all hear that Toyota brakes are inherently "soft", and there is a lot of truth in that.

I recently replaced rotors/pads and flushed/ bled the system on our 1999 Avalon. The brakes just didn't feel like our Mercedes as far as firmness. They stopped well, but they have never felt firm and I don't like the feel. New stuff and thorough bleeding didn't make much difference.

I removed the trim panel under the steering wheel (two hex head screws at the bottom and four friction clips at the top). Remove the metal underpanel (two hex head screws). Sorta stand on your head and you can see the brake pedal height adjustment. Back off the lock nut (blue paint on mine) and adjust the rod out of the bracket a bit by grabbing the knurled knob with pliers. Raise the pedal height a touch (~ 4mm.). Make sure stop light switch still is in range (should be).

This made a WORLD of difference in the "feel". Much firmer feel, even though it's just a height adjustment. Thought I'd pass it on FWIW.
 

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97 Avy XLS
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92 Posts
jbaj007 said:
We all hear that Toyota brakes are inherently "soft", and there is a lot of truth in that.

I recently replaced rotors/pads and flushed/ bled the system on our 1999 Avalon. The brakes just didn't feel like our Mercedes as far as firmness. They stopped well, but they have never felt firm and I don't like the feel. New stuff and thorough bleeding didn't make much difference.

I removed the trim panel under the steering wheel (two hex head screws at the bottom and four friction clips at the top). Remove the metal underpanel (two hex head screws). Sorta stand on your head and you can see the brake pedal height adjustment. Back off the lock nut (blue paint on mine) and adjust the rod out of the bracket a bit by grabbing the knurled knob with pliers. Raise the pedal height a touch (~ 4mm.). Make sure stop light switch still is in range (should be).

This made a WORLD of difference in the "feel". Much firmer feel, even though it's just a height adjustment. Thought I'd pass it on FWIW.
Sounds intriguing. Are you sure that the brake calipers are fully releasing when your not using the brake pedal? If so, excellent suggestion. But, if it's not, you'll burn up your brake pads, calipers, & rotors. Check it and be sure. After driving about 10-15 miles of normal driving, put your hand near the rotor *don't touch it directly unless your sure it's not too hot. They should be luke warm to the touch after letting them sit for about 10 minutes no hotter. If youcan't put your hand on them after 5-10 minutes then that's your answer. Keep us informed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Steve,
The rod position relative to the master cylinder shouldn't change position; only the pedal to the rod relative position is changed. I know this really doesn't firm up the travel distance, but, honest, it made a HUGE difference in "feel". Not like a BMW (very firm), but much better than it has been for years. Maybe the pedal return spring pressure is in a more ideal range of it's movement?

I did go check, though, and no evidence of binding. ;) Thanks.....got me outta the chair to be sure.
 
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