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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking about changing spark plugs before winter - 2012 Camry LE 4-cyl. I have almost 132,000 miles on the original plugs, and the car runs great with excellent gas mileage.

Should I change the plugs, anyway? My local dealer had said that they can go at least 100-120K miles, and I'm well beyond that. But I'm also a believer in not fixing what's not broken. Any thoughts pro or con?
If I do change them - I assume that OE platinum plugs are the way to go?
What is the torque spec for the plugs?
Should I change the coil packs, as well, or can they go another 100K+ miles?
Anything out of the ordinary that I should know about when doing this?

Thanks.
 

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beware lots of counterfeit denso and ngk spark plugs. buy from reputable dealers and not from ebay. you'll probably need to replace the valve cover also. be careful on the coil pack wiring harness clips. they can break easily.
 

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イリジウム
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^ that's why I buy parts from rockauto, and search up a 5% off code. They're pretty good with who they source their parts.

Look on NGK's website, you should be using the Laser Iridium, NOT the old platinums. NGK suggests 18 lb/ft dry threads. I've seen 13 or 14 lb/ft and seems to suggest dry, but IMO those should be with a dab of Permatex Copper anti-seize 3 threads away from the tip.
 

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Did my 2012 4 cylinder a couple of weeks ago. No reason to do valve cover. Used copper anti-seize as suggested.
Plugs came from Rock Auto.
Change at suggested mileage. The longer you wait the greater the chance of having problems when you try to remove.
 

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Captain Camry
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Denso (or NGK) Iridium only. Good and tight is tight enough. Coil packs are not plugs and wires, only change when they go bad.
I absolutely second everything said here. Do you 'need' to replace them? Who knows, but for the $30 you might save, is it worth the gamble? Just do it. The 100% official torque spec is 18 ft/lb, but 'good and tight' is also correct. Here's what I used:
 

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I absolutely second everything said here. Do you 'need' to replace them? Who knows, but for the $30 you might save, is it worth the gamble? Just do it. The 100% official torque spec is 18 ft/lb, but 'good and tight' is also correct. Here's what I used:
I got the "special" and cool Denso TT's. Not much difference 😵 . I still got the long life Denso's because no one wants them for free (pay shipping only) so I guess they are a backup.
Less than a year's use, less than 10,000 miles use
Makes me feel "special" (and to see if it would change anything after my ECU tune dyno run)
 

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Denso (or NGK) Iridium only. Good and tight is tight enough. Coil packs are not plugs and wires, only change when they go bad.
When did Coil-On-Plug's become "coil packs"?

Coil packs are remote, multi-terminal coils that use individual high-tension wires to feed voltage to the spark plugs.

One thing about replacing plugs earlier is that it restores the original smaller gap, which increases the life of any kind of coil by reducing the voltage spike. The smaller gap is also better at dealing with oil fouling or with fuel fouling at very cold starting temperatures, delivering more reliable sparks.
 

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When did Coil-On-Plug's become "coil packs"?

Coil packs are remote, multi-terminal coils that use individual high-tension wires to feed voltage to the spark plugs.

One thing about replacing plugs earlier is that it restores the original smaller gap, which increases the life of any kind of coil by reducing the voltage spike. The smaller gap is also better at dealing with oil fouling or with fuel fouling at very cold starting temperatures, delivering more reliable sparks.
Multiple names for multiple things. It gets confusing overtime and I am not the type to memorize anything specific.
 

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Your plugs are long due replacement.
After you replaced them, locate and pull main ECM fuse, so that it learns new plugs. Or, don't be surprised if your mpg drops...
Does that imply that the ECM has an adjustment feature that gets memorized?

And, if it did, wouldn't it have had to acquire the data from actual driving, as opposed to a return to the original base map?

I can't really imagine that the fuel mixture or ignition timing would need to be changed going from used to new plugs, since it would seem to only affect the reliability of the spark. Maybe the optimum timing might be subtly different, but how would the ECM ever know?

Does Toyota specify that the ECM be powered down during a spark plug replacement?
 

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Does that imply that the ECM has an adjustment feature that gets memorized?

And, if it did, wouldn't it have had to acquire the data from actual driving, as opposed to a return to the original base map?

I can't really imagine that the fuel mixture or ignition timing would need to be changed going from used to new plugs, since it would seem to only affect the reliability of the spark. Maybe the optimum timing might be subtly different, but how would the ECM ever know?

Does Toyota specify that the ECM be powered down during a spark plug replacement?
It's something that could help so it is optionial.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you to all who replied. I'll change my plugs before winter, and do the serpentine belt at the same time. Both will be Toyota (or Denso) parts, for sure.

I've heard that using anti-seize changes the torque spec. In many years of changing plugs on my old car, I've never used it and never had problems. How "necessary" is it? Is there something about a Toyota engine that makes this necessary?

I like the tip that the new plugs will have a slightly smaller gap which will extend the life of the coils. I agree that pulling the ECM fuse is optional.

On my old car, which used to get carbon buildups, I would add a can of Sea Foam into the fuel tank at my first fill-up following a plug change. Anyone else do something like this? I'd assume that my old plugs coated with carbon would indicate a need for this, but I'll ask if this is a useful step?

Thanks, again.
 

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Thank you to all who replied. I'll change my plugs before winter, and do the serpentine belt at the same time. Both will be Toyota (or Denso) parts, for sure.

I've heard that using anti-seize changes the torque spec. In many years of changing plugs on my old car, I've never used it and never had problems. How "necessary" is it? Is there something about a Toyota engine that makes this necessary?

I like the tip that the new plugs will have a slightly smaller gap which will extend the life of the coils. I agree that pulling the ECM fuse is optional.

On my old car, which used to get carbon buildups, I would add a can of Sea Foam into the fuel tank at my first fill-up following a plug change. Anyone else do something like this? I'd assume that my old plugs coated with carbon would indicate a need for this, but I'll ask if this is a useful step?

Thanks, again.
You don't need to anti-seize them if you don't want to. It just helps and either way, at least for me, good and tight is good and tight. You could adjust the gap of the spark plugs but that too is optional since they are pre-gapped but if they are noticeably bad then go for it. It doesn't hurt much to use Sea Foam. I just use Techron every 10,000 miles or when I just feel like using some.
 
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