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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would anti-seize suffice as thread sealant for spark plug tubes?

I'll be resealing the tubes due to leakage and I've read some people recommend not using any sealant because it could lead to over torquing. But I want to be sure it doesn't leak.
 

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Would anti-seize suffice as thread sealant for spark plug tubes?

I'll be resealing the tubes due to leakage and I've read some people recommend not using any sealant because it could lead to over torquing. But I want to be sure it doesn't leak.
Are you talking about the threads at the top of the tubes (for the nuts holding the valve cover), or the threads at the bottom of the tubes (that thread into the head)?

If at the top, just a little oil would be sufficient for lubing. No need for an anti-seize product.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are you talking about the threads at the top of the tubes (for the nuts holding the valve cover), or the threads at the bottom of the tubes (that thread into the head)?
Bottom of tubes. The number 1 and #4 tubes are leaking just above the spark plugs. Every week I have to roll up a paper towel and stick it down the tube to absorb the oil.

Or if OP's talking about the bottom threads, then no, antiseize will wash out.

Make sure all threads are clean and free of oil, then use Permatex Ultra Black maximum oil resistance RTV.
http://www.permatex.com/products-2/...l-resistance-rtv-silicone-gasket-maker-detail
Allow to fully cure for 24 hours if you can. This will allow for a more lasting seal.
The description on the antiseize package says it will not wash out but it is probably referring to water, not oil.

I was going to get Permatex 59214 but the Ultra Black seems more resistant to both oil and gas.
 

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The bottom threads of the spark tube have a thread-lock compound on them from the factory. That prevents the tubes from accidently turning out when the valve cover top nuts are loosened, and seals the threads from oil. As a result, given the tubes are very difficult to loosen and remove from the head, the sealant doesn't typically wear out and cause an oil leak.

Most times when oil gets inside a spark plug tube, it does not originate at the bottom from the threads going into the head. It originates from the top, where the rubber seals in the underside of the valve cover get hard and don't seal against the tubes well. If you never had the spark plug tubes out, and if you never changed the seals for the spark plug tubes that are installed in the underside of the valve cover, I would most certainly change them first to stop your oil leak into the tubes. Most people damage the tubes when they try to remove them, not knowing the threads at the bottom most likely is not the source of their oil leaks in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The bottom threads of the spark tube have a thread-lock compound on them from the factory. That prevents the tubes from accidently turning out when the valve cover top nuts are loosened, and seals the threads from oil. As a result, given the tubes are very difficult to loosen and remove from the head, the sealant doesn't typically wear out and cause an oil leak.

Most times when oil gets inside a spark plug tube, it does not originate at the bottom from the threads going into the head. It originates from the top, where the rubber seals in the underside of the valve cover get hard and don't seal against the tubes well. If you never had the spark plug tubes out, and if you never changed the seals for the spark plug tubes that are installed in the underside of the valve cover, I would most certainly change them first to stop your oil leak into the tubes. Most people damage the tubes when they try to remove them, not knowing the threads at the bottom most likely is not the source of their oil leaks in the first place.
The valve cover gasket and tube gaskets was replaced last year with Felpro gaskets. I doubt it is leaking from the top because it is dry on the tube walls except down at the bottom.

 

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If you are confident the oil is not coming from the top of the spark plug tubes, then your oil choice is to remove the tubes from the head and reseal (with a thread lock compound) the tubes back into the head.

You need to be very careful in taking turning these tubes out of the head - the thread lock will be difficult to break loose, and the tubes can dent which will cause a fair amount of problems (unless you can get replacements).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you are confident the oil is not coming from the top of the spark plug tubes, then your oil choice is to remove the tubes from the head and reseal (with a thread lock compound) the tubes back into the head.

You need to be very careful in taking turning these tubes out of the head - the thread lock will be difficult to break loose, and the tubes can dent which will cause a fair amount of problems (unless you can get replacements).
Since I dont have the right tools for removing the tubes, i'm just going to reseal the top grommets with ultra black.
If the leaks continue then for sure the leaks are from the bottom.
 

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Would anti-seize suffice as thread sealant for spark plug tubes?

I'll be resealing the tubes due to leakage and I've read some people recommend not using any sealant because it could lead to over torquing. But I want to be sure it doesn't leak.
Just to be clear, we're talking about the tubes threads that go into cylinder head, not just the nuts that secure the valve cover, right?

You're supposed to use Toyota FIPG (I think it's same thing as Permatex Black). Apply some to the tube threats before threading them in.

When I did the job, two of the tubes came out pretty easily (they were the ones leaking) and I re-sealed them as stated above. The other two wouldn't budge, so I let them be. No more leaks.

I used the nut over nut method and it worked fine. There is actually a tube removal tool (inserts inside the tube and pushes outwards to lock), but I was never able to find one for sale at a reasonable price, if at all.
 
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