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2015 Toyota Camry V6 XLE
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone!!

I was wondering why is the Speed Governor set so low at ~115 MPH [180 km/h]

I find that all or most late model Toyota I've driven are set to this [2010+]

I had a '13 Kia Optima that was at ~130 MPH [210 KM/H] ... I hit 215 km/h

*NOTE* I tried this on a Track, NOT on the main road.

Both vehicles were tested on a track course!!

I know we all won't even go past 80+ mph on a daily drive but 115mph limited is still "weak"
 

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straight cash homie
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That's what Toyota set it at...that's why, and clearly its lower than Kia's. I suppose Toyota legal had a big say into that. Have you tried to disable it?
 

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Usually, the maximum speed is set based on tire specification...

The higher the speed rating on a tire, the more it costs. Let's say a manufacturer has a car that will go 125 mph. This would normally require an H-rated tire (130 mph max.) However, the manufacturer will spec out a T-rated tire (119 mph) to save costs. Then they will limit the vehicle to a speed safely below the tire's speed rating (110 mph for example.) And it doesn't mean that every model of that car will have a T-rated tire either...there are probably lower end models with T-rated tires and higher end models with H or V-rated ones. Its usually the lowest common denominator.
 

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Hi everyone!!

I was wondering why is the Speed Governor set so low at ~115 MPH [180 km/h]

I find that all or most late model Toyota I've driven are set to this [2010+]

I had a '13 Kia Optima that was at ~130 MPH [210 KM/H] ... I hit 215 km/h

*NOTE* I tried this on a Track, NOT on the main road.

Both vehicles were tested on a track course!!

I know we all won't even go past 80+ mph on a daily drive but 115mph limited is still "weak"
I'd say you're in the minority if you consider 115 MPH a "low" speed. Why does anyone need to go even that fast? I'm guessing about .0000000001% of Camry owners have taken it to a track. We're talking a family sedan here, not Vettes and Vipers.
 

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Usually, the maximum speed is set based on tire specification...

The higher the speed rating on a tire, the more it costs. Let's say a manufacturer has a car that will go 125 mph. This would normally require an H-rated tire (130 mph max.) However, the manufacturer will spec out a T-rated tire (119 mph) to save costs. Then they will limit the vehicle to a speed safely below the tire's speed rating (110 mph for example.) And it doesn't mean that every model of that car will have a T-rated tire either...there are probably lower end models with T-rated tires and higher end models with H or V-rated ones. Its usually the lowest common denominator.
Bingo. Track driving on normal street tires can sometimes cord them in a matter of laps due to over heating, especially if the speed rating is too low. Temp rating can play a part too I suspect. The only other thing that could play a role might also involve transmission cooling which with an automatic is the other thing that can very quickly limit you on a track day.
 

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straight cash homie
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Usually, the maximum speed is set based on tire specification...

The higher the speed rating on a tire, the more it costs. Let's say a manufacturer has a car that will go 125 mph. This would normally require an H-rated tire (130 mph max.) However, the manufacturer will spec out a T-rated tire (119 mph) to save costs. Then they will limit the vehicle to a speed safely below the tire's speed rating (110 mph for example.) And it doesn't mean that every model of that car will have a T-rated tire either...there are probably lower end models with T-rated tires and higher end models with H or V-rated ones. Its usually the lowest common denominator.
IIRC, aren't all Camry's OE tires V rated?
 

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My personal opinion is that the suspension, especially the rear suspension is not up to the task of anything over 110. There really isn't enough feedback in the steering either to navigate high speed safely.
 

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According to TireRack, the tire used on a base model L is only S rated, though the V6 tires are both V rated.
 

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As others have said, it is most likely due to tire speed rating. Also keep in mind that a tire's speed rating is a straight line rating only. When you pull a car through curves you are imposing more strain on the tire.

Regardless of what tire originally came on your car, you do have the option to replace them with anything you want. In my experience, the average driver knows nothing about tires except for the number behind the $. If you put cheap S rated tires on your car, 115 is right above the safe threshold.

I'm also willing to guess that the 115 number might also be based on government regulations. It is quite possible that 115 is the number where the engine started losing fuel and/or emissions efficiency and to be sold in the United States under a certain classification/price point this is where the governor was set.

I applaud you for having the brains to at least take the cars to a track to gauge their top speed. Keep in mind, however that not everyone is so intelligent and they will run their cars this way out on the open road straight from the lot. 115 is weak for a track car but these are not built as track cars. I would wager to say that over 95% of Toyotas will never see a race track, and those that see any serious racing time with respectable racers will be properly set up and in that process the ECU will be retuned which will either defeat or raise the limit on the governor.
 

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4Runner & Fusion
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OP, did the vehicle have a full tank of gas? If not, the G forces might have pushed the fuel away from the pickup.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That's what Toyota set it at...that's why, and clearly its lower than Kia's. I suppose Toyota legal had a big say into that. Have you tried to disable it?
I have not tried disabling it yet. Will look into it sometime.

I'd say you're in the minority if you consider 115 MPH a "low" speed. Why does anyone need to go even that fast? I'm guessing about .0000000001% of Camry owners have taken it to a track. We're talking a family sedan here, not Vettes and Vipers.
I am not comparing it to a sports car but for a V6, at least goveror it to something that makes the V6 seems more like a sports car.

OP, did the vehicle have a full tank of gas? If not, the G forces might have pushed the fuel away from the pickup.
It was 3/4 full
 

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Greetings,

When a vehicle hits its maximum speed, its longitudinal acceleration is zero, so fuel slosh due to this factor ought not to be an issue. At 115(+) mph, aerodynamics become quite important. But looking at the 7th-gen body, I don't see any feature portending undue lift - in fact, but just guessing now - the body seems to be roughly lift neutral.

The basic tires and suspension have lots of understeer, which aids stability, and especially at high speeds.

I'd guess that as many are saying, it's a least-common-denominator approach to tire speed rating and a basic desire on the part of company management to keep its customers from harming themselves directly, and the company indirectly.

Best,
Mark
 

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BeerSteakTxas
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The primary reason is safety. Obviously, the roadways would be a lot more dangerous if everyone was driving well over 100 miles per hour (160.9 kilometers per hour) all the time. The faster a car travels, the more aerodynamically unstable it is due to wind resistance, so it's hard to handle. Most drivers simply don't have the reflexes it takes to handle those kinds of speeds.
Speed limiters are also there to protect the engine and the car itself. An engine's lifespan drops significantly if it's running at maximum speed all the time because it is being made to work much harder than it normally would.
Another important factor is the car's tires. Ever look at all those numbers and letters on the sides of your tires? Those tell you not only the size of the tires, but also their speed rating. The speed rating tells you the maximum velocity a tire can sustain before it's in danger of blowing out. Most family sedans and vans have S or T rated tires, meaning it's best to keep them under 112 miles per hour (180.2 kilometers per hour) and 118 miles per hour (189.9 kilometers per hour), respectively. Some exotic sports cars have Y rated tires, which can handle up to 186 miles per hour (299.3 kilometers per hour) [source: Tire Rack].
There are environmental factors as well. The faster a car goes, the more fuel it consumes and the more pollution it produces. In addition, law enforcement in your area probably wouldn't be too thrilled if you decided to attempt to best the Veyron's speed record.
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/car-driving-safety/safety-regulatory-devices/speed-limiter1.htm
 

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I have a 2018 Corolla XSE which has the sport button and the top speed on the dash says 140. Then you should at least allow the car to go to 140. I agree 110 is weak. It would be great if someone would tell me how to remove the governor. Im guessing its in the computer somewhere.
 

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Your insurance company asked for it, and Toyota obliged.

Its all in the name of liability. Speed governors should be set for drivers age... swipe license to drive...

Most can't even drive correctly at the speed limit.
 

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The tires are matched to the top speed of the vehicle not the other way around. If they wanted it to be higher they would simply put V rated tires on it. There is probably something mechanical that can't tolerate higher speeds. Years ago some Mustang V6 owners decided to take off the 112 MPH governor that Ford put on the car. Only to find out it was there because at higher speeds the driveshaft would come off, it wasn't designed to handle the rotational forces at higher speeds.
 
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